Athletics at the 1952 Summer Olympics – Men's 100 metres

Last updated
Men's 100 metres
at the Games of the XV Olympiad
Venue Olympic Stadium
Helsinki, Finland
Dates20 July 1952 (heats, quarterfinals)
21 July 1952 (semifinals, final)
Competitors72 from 33 nations
Winning time10.4 seconds (hand)
10.79 seconds (auto)
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svg Lindy Remigino US flag 48 stars.svg  United States
Silver medal icon.svg Herb McKenley Flag of Jamaica (1906-1957).svg  Jamaica
Bronze medal icon.svg McDonald Bailey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain
  1948
1956  

The men's 100 metres sprint event at the 1952 Olympic Games in Helsinki, Finland was held at the Olympic Stadium on 20 and 21 July. Seventy-two athletes from 33 nations competed; each nation was limited to 3 runners. The final was won by American Lindy Remigino, the fourth consecutive victory by a different American. [1] Herb McKenley won Jamaica's first medal in the men's 100 metres with his silver, while McDonald Bailey's bronze put Great Britain on the podium for the first time since 1928. The final was "probably the closest mass finish in Olympic 100 metre history" with the first four runners all clocking in at 10.4 seconds hand-timed, all six finalists within 0.12 seconds electric-timed (10.79 for first, 10.91 for sixth), and a photo finish necessary to separate the winners. [2]

Contents

Background

This was the twelfth time the event was held, having appeared at every Olympics since the first in 1896. None of the medalists from 1948 returned, but sixth-place finisher McDonald Bailey (who had recently tied the world record) did. London bronze medalist Lloyd LaBeach's brother Byron LaBeach represented Jamaica. Other notable entrants were American Art Bragg and Jamaican Herb McKenley, who were favorites along with Bailey. [2]

Bulgaria, Ghana, Guatemala, Israel, Nigeria, the Soviet Union, Thailand, and Venezuela were represented in the event for the first time. The United States was the only nation to have appeared at each of the first twelve Olympic men's 100 metres events.

Competition format

The event retained the four round format from 1920 to 1948: heats, quarterfinals, semifinals, and a final. There were 12 heats, of 4–7 athletes each, with the top 2 in each heat advancing to the quarterfinals. The 24 quarterfinalists were placed into 4 heats of 6 athletes. The top 3 in each quarterfinal advanced to the semifinals. There were 2 heats of 6 semifinalists, once again with the top 3 advancing to the 6-man final. [2]

Records

Prior to the competition, the existing World and Olympic records were as follows.

World record 10.2 Flag of the United States.svg Jesse Owens Chicago, United States 20 June 1936
10.2 Flag of the United States.svg Harold Davis Compton, United States6 June 1941
10.2 Flag of Panama.svg Lloyd LaBeach Fresno, United States15 May 1948
10.2 Flag of the United States.svg Barney Ewell Evanston, United States9 July 1948
10.2 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg McDonald Bailey Belgrade, Yugoslavia 25 August 1951
Olympic record10.3 Flag of the United States.svg Eddie Tolan Los Angeles, USA 1 August 1932
10.3 Flag of the United States.svg Ralph Metcalfe Los Angeles, USA 1 August 1932
10.3 Flag of the United States.svg Jesse Owens Berlin, Germany 2 August 1936
10.3 Flag of the United States.svg Harrison Dillard London, United Kingdom 31 July 1948

Results

Heats

The fastest two runners in each of the twelve heats advanced to the quarterfinal round.

Heat one

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 John Treloar Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.92Q
2 Alan Lillington Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.06Q
3 Gabriel Lareya Flag of the Gold Coast.svg  Ghana 11.18
4 Miroslav Horčic Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 11.23
5 Ásmundur Bjarnason Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 11.40
6 Youssef Ali Omar Flag of Egypt (1922-1958).svg  Egypt 11.53
7 José Julio Barillas Flag of Guatemala.svg  Guatemala 11.56

Heat two

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Étienne Bally Flag of France.svg  France 10.97Q
2 Angel Kolev Flag of Bulgaria (1948-1967).svg  Bulgaria 11.01Q
3 Paul Dolan Flag of Ireland.svg  Ireland 11.12
4 Raúl Mazorra Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 11.19
5 Robert Hutchinson Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 11.26
6 Masaji Tajima Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 11.29
7 Adul Wanasatith Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 11.61

Heat three

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 McDonald Bailey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.65Q
2 Carlo Vittori Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 10.98Q
3 Mikhail Kazantsev Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 11.16
4 Hörður Haraldsson Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 11.31
5 Javier Souza Flag of Mexico (1934-1968).svg  Mexico 11.32
6 Stefanos Petrakis Flag of Greece (1828-1978).svg  Greece 11.33

Heat four

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 William Jack Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.05Q
2 Romeo Galán Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11.11Q
3 Levan Sanadze Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 11.13
4 Emad El-Din Shafei Flag of Egypt (1922-1958).svg  Egypt 11.40
5 Guillermo Gutiérrez Flag of Venezuela (1930-1954).svg  Venezuela 11.42
6 Boonterm Pakpuang Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 11.85

Heat five

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Herb McKenley Flag of Jamaica (1906-1957).svg  Jamaica 10.88Q
2 György Csányi Flag of Hungary (1949-1956).svg  Hungary 11.09Q
3 Emil Kiszka Flag of Poland (1928-1980).svg  Poland 11.13
4 Pauli Tavisalo Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 11.30
5 Tomás Paquete Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 11.45
6 Walter Sutton Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 11.45

Heat six

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 David Tabak Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 11.12Q
2 Tomio Hosoda Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 11.14Q
3 Willy Schneider Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 11.22
4 Angel Gavrilov Flag of Bulgaria (1948-1967).svg  Bulgaria 11.29
5 Juan Leiva Flag of Venezuela (1930-1954).svg  Venezuela 11.31

Heat seven

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Vladimir Sukharev Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 10.93Q
2 Theo Saat Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.02Q
3 Muhammad Sharif Butt Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 11.17
4 Voitto Hellstén Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 11.36
5 George Acquaah Flag of the Gold Coast.svg  Ghana 11.47
6 Mariano Acosta Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11.58
7 Wolfango Montanari Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 12.25

Heat eight

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Rafael Fortún Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.93Q
2 Byron LaBeach Flag of Jamaica (1906-1957).svg  Jamaica 11.09Q
3 Franco Leccese Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 11.18
4 Issi Baran Flag of Finland.svg  Finland 11.32
5 Fritz Griesser Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 11.54

Heat nine

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Werner Zandt Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 11.03Q
2 Muhammad Aslam Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 11.18Q
3 Don McFarlane Canadian Red Ensign (1921-1957).svg  Canada 11.25
4 Zdeněk Pospíšil Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 11.25
5 Edward Ajado Flag of British Colonial Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 11.25
6 Fawzi Chaaban Flag of Egypt (1922-1958).svg  Egypt 11.51
- Enrique Beckles Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina DSQ

Heat ten

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Art Bragg US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.73Q
2 Hans Wehrli Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 11.00Q
3 Titus Erinle Flag of British Colonial Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 11.12
4 László Zarándi Flag of Hungary (1949-1956).svg  Hungary 11.26
5 Pétur Sigurðsson Flag of Iceland.svg  Iceland 11.55
6 Arun Sankosik Flag of Thailand.svg  Thailand 11.76

Heat eleven

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Lindy Remigino US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.73Q
2 Lavy Pinto Flag of India.svg  India 11.00Q
3 René Bonino Flag of France.svg  France 11.00
4 František Brož Flag of Czechoslovakia.svg  Czechoslovakia 11.32
5 Abdul Aziz Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 11.48
6 Rui Maia Flag of Portugal.svg  Portugal 11.79

Heat twelve

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Dean Smith US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.90Q
2 Alain Porthault Flag of France.svg  France 11.04Q
3 Erich Fuchs Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 11.19
4 Karim Olowu Flag of British Colonial Nigeria.svg  Nigeria 11.27

Quarterfinals

The fastest three runners in each of the four heats advanced to the semifinal round.

Quarterfinal one

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 McDonald Bailey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.73Q
2 John Treloar Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.84Q
3 Alain Porthault Flag of France.svg  France 10.99Q
4 Muhammad Aslam Flag of Pakistan.svg  Pakistan 11.02
5 Byron LaBeach Flag of Jamaica (1906-1957).svg  Jamaica 11.05
- Angel Kolev Flag of Bulgaria (1948-1967).svg  Bulgaria DSQ

Quarterfinal two

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Lindy Remigino US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.68Q
2 Theo Saat Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 10.93Q
3 Lavy Pinto Flag of India.svg  India 10.98Q
4 Étienne Bally Flag of France.svg  France 10.98
5 Hans Wehrli Flag of Switzerland.svg  Switzerland 11.05
6 Alan Lillington Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.26

Quarterfinal three

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Dean Smith US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.69Q
2 Rafael Fortún Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.90Q
3 William Jack Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.94Q
4 Werner Zandt Flag of Germany.svg  Germany 10.98
5 Romeo Galán Flag of Argentina.svg  Argentina 11.08
6 David Tabak Flag of Israel.svg  Israel 11.10

Quarterfinal four

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Herb McKenley Flag of Jamaica (1906-1957).svg  Jamaica 10.72Q
2 Art Bragg US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.75Q
3 Vladimir Sukharev Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 10.92Q
4 Tomio Hosoda Flag of Japan (1870-1999).svg  Japan 11.03
5 György Csányi Flag of Hungary (1949-1956).svg  Hungary 11.07
6 Carlo Vittori Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 11.79

Semifinals

The fastest three runners in each of the two heats advanced to the final round.

Semifinal one

Bragg tore a muscle in this semifinal. [3]

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 McDonald Bailey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.74Q
2 Dean Smith US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.78Q
3 Vladimir Sukharev Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 10.86Q
4 Lavy Pinto Flag of India.svg  India 10.94
5 Alain Porthault Flag of France.svg  France 11.04
6 Art Bragg US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 11.43

Semifinal two

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
1 Herb McKenley Flag of Jamaica (1906-1957).svg  Jamaica 10.74Q
2 Lindy Remigino US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.74Q
3 John Treloar Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.76Q
4 Rafael Fortún Flag of Cuba.svg  Cuba 10.92
5 William Jack Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 11.01
6 Theo Saat Flag of the Netherlands.svg  Netherlands 11.12

Final

RankAthleteNationTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Lindy Remigino US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.79Photo-determined finish
Silver medal icon.svg Herb McKenley Flag of Jamaica (1906-1957).svg  Jamaica 10.80
Bronze medal icon.svg McDonald Bailey Flag of the United Kingdom.svg  Great Britain 10.83
4 Dean Smith US flag 48 stars.svg  United States 10.84
5 Vladimir Sukharev Flag of the Soviet Union (1936-1955).svg  Soviet Union 10.88
6 John Treloar Flag of Australia.svg  Australia 10.91

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References

  1. "Athletics at the 1952 Helsinki Summer Games: Men's 100 metres". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 9 June 2017.
  2. 1 2 3 "100 metres, Men". Olympedia. Retrieved 21 July 2020.
  3. Official Report, p. 250.