Athletics at the 1990 Commonwealth Games – Men's 1500 metres

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The men's 1500 metres event at the 1990 Commonwealth Games was held on 2 and 3 February at the Mount Smart Stadium in Auckland. [1]

1500 metres foremost middle distance track event in athletics

The 1500 metres or 1,500-metre run is the foremost middle distance track event in athletics. The distance has been contested at the Summer Olympics since 1896 and the World Championships in Athletics since 1983. It is equivalent to 1.5 kilometers or approximately ​1516 miles.

Athletics at the 1990 Commonwealth Games

At the 1990 Commonwealth Games, the athletics events were held at the Mount Smart Stadium in Auckland, New Zealand from 27 January to 3 February 1990. A total of 42 events were contested, 23 by male and 19 by female athletes.

Mount Smart Stadium football stadium

The Mount Smart Stadium is a stadium in Auckland, New Zealand. It is the home ground of National Rugby League team, the New Zealand Warriors. Built within the quarried remnants of the Rarotonga / Mount Smart volcanic cone, it is located 10 kilometres south of the city centre, in the suburb of Penrose.

Contents

Medalists

GoldSilverBronze
Peter Elliott
Flag of England.svg  England
Wilfred Kirochi
Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya
Peter O'Donoghue
Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand

Results

Heats

Qualification: First 5 of each heat (Q) and the next 2 fastest (q) qualified for the final.

RankHeatNameNationalityTimeNotes
11 Peter Elliott Flag of England.svg  England 3:42.88Q
22 Joseph Cheshire Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 3:43.05Q
32 Simon Doyle Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3:43.15Q
41 Tony Morrell Flag of England.svg  England 3:43.28Q
52 John Walker Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 3:43.29Q
62 Dave Campbell Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3:43.39Q
71 Wilfred Kirochi Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 3:43.46Q
81 Peter O'Donoghue Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 3:43.54Q
92 Ian Hamer Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 3:43.55Q
102 William Tanui Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 3:43.62q
111 Pat Scammell Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3:44.22Q
122 Mbiganyi Thee Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana 3:44.39q
131 Alan Bunce Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 3:45.52
141 Mark Kirk Ulster Banner.svg  Northern Ireland 3:46.50
152 Linton McKenzie Flag of Jamaica.svg  Jamaica 3:48.74
161 Neil Horsfield Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 3:49.34
171 Colin Mathieson Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3:50.66
181 Wilson Theleso Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana 3:50.83
191 Melford Homela Flag of Zimbabwe.svg  Zimbabwe 3:50.89
202 Gary Barber Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3:53.76
212 John Siguria Flag of Papua New Guinea.svg  Papua New Guinea 4:05.49
1 Ancel Nalau Flag of Vanuatu.svg  Vanuatu DNS
2 Sebastian Coe Flag of England.svg  England DNS

Final

RankNameNationalityTimeNotes
Gold medal icon.svg Peter Elliott Flag of England.svg  England 3:33.39
Silver medal icon.svg Wilfred Kirochi Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 3:34.41
Bronze medal icon.svg Peter O'Donoghue Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 3:35.14
4 Simon Doyle Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3:35.70
5 Tony Morrell Flag of England.svg  England 3:35.87
6 William Tanui Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 3:37.77
7 Joseph Cheshire Flag of Kenya.svg  Kenya 3:40.58
8 Mbiganyi Thee Flag of Botswana.svg  Botswana 3:44.34
9 Ian Hamer Flag of Wales (1959-present).svg  Wales 3:46.23
10 Dave Campbell Flag of Canada (Pantone).svg  Canada 3:50.07
11 Pat Scammell Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3:50.47
12 John Walker Flag of New Zealand.svg  New Zealand 3:53.77

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References

  1. "Results". Archived from the original on 2012-09-14. Retrieved 2016-08-04.