Chris Van Allsburg

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Chris Van Allsburg
Chris van Allsburg - Northborough MA 12-2011.jpg
Van Allsburg in 2011
Born (1949-06-18) June 18, 1949 (age 71)
East Grand Rapids, Michigan, U.S.
OccupationIllustrator, writer
Alma mater University of Michigan
Rhode Island School of Design
Genre Children's picture books
Notable works
Notable awards Caldecott Medal
1982, 1986
Spouse
Lisa Van Allsburg
(m. 1974)
Children2
Website
hmhbooks.com/chrisvanallsburg/

Chris Van Allsburg (born June 18, 1949) is an American illustrator and writer of children's books. He has won two Caldecott Medals for U.S. picture book illustration, for Jumanji (1981) and The Polar Express (1985), both of which he also wrote; both were later adapted as successful motion pictures. He was also a Caldecott runner-up in 1980 for The Garden of Abdul Gasazi . [1] [2] For his contribution as a children's illustrator he was 1986 U.S. nominee for the biennial International Hans Christian Andersen Award, the highest international recognition for creators of children's books. [3] He received the honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters from the University of Michigan in April 2012.

Contents

Life and career

Van Allsburg was born on the June 18, 1949 to a Dutch family in East Grand Rapids, Michigan, the second child of Doris Christianen and Richard Van Allsburg. [4] He has a sister named Karen, born in 1947. His family lived in an old farmhouse, but when he was three years old, they moved to a Grand Rapids home near an elementary school that Chris was able to walk to for class. His family moved again to East Grand Rapids where he attended middle school and high school. [5] Van Allsburg attended the College of Architecture and Design at the University of Michigan, which at that time included an art school. He majored in sculpture, learning bronze casting, wood carving, resin molding, and other techniques. He graduated from the University of Michigan in 1972 and continued his education at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD), graduating with a master's degree in sculpture in 1975. After graduation, Van Allsburg set up a sculpture studio.

Van Allsburg struggled for a time with his sculpture studio. At home he began a series of sketches that his wife thought would be suitable for children's books. She showed his work to an editor who contracted his first book The Garden of Abdul Gasazi , in 1979. [6]

Van Allsburg lives in Beverly, Massachusetts with Lisa Van Allsburg, his wife since 1974. They have two daughters, Sophia and Anna. Van Allsburg converted to Judaism, his spouse's faith. [7]

Van Allsburg has written and/or illustrated 21 books. His art has also been featured on the covers of an edition of C. S. Lewis's series The Chronicles of Narnia , published by HarperCollins in 1994, as well as in three children's books written by Mark Helprin

Books

Films

Related Research Articles

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The John Newbery Medal, frequently shortened to the Newbery, is a literary award given by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA), to the author of "the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children". The Newbery and the Caldecott Medal are considered the two most prestigious awards for children's literature in the United States. Books selected are widely carried by bookstores and libraries, the authors are interviewed on television, and master's and doctoral theses are written on them. Named for John Newbery, an 18th-century English publisher of juvenile books, the winner of the Newbery is selected at the ALA's Midwinter Conference by a fifteen-person committee. The Newbery was proposed by Frederic G. Melcher in 1921, making it the first children's book award in the world. The physical bronze medal was designed by Rene Paul Chambellan and is given to the winning author at the next ALA annual conference. Since its founding there have been several changes to the composition of the selection committee, while the physical medal remains the same.

Caldecott Medal Annual U. S. childrens book illustrator award

The Randolph Caldecott Medal, frequently shortened to just the Caldecott, annually recognizes the preceding year's "most distinguished American picture book for children". It is awarded to the illustrator by the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The Caldecott and Newbery Medals are considered the most prestigious American children's book awards. Beside the Caldecott Medal, the committee awards a variable number of citations to runners-up they deem worthy, called the Caldecott Honor or Caldecott Honor Books.

<i>Jumanji</i> (picture book) Childrens book by Chris Van Allsburg

Jumanji is a 1981 fantasy children's picture book, written and illustrated by the American author Chris Van Allsburg. The book is about a magical board game that implements animals and other jungle elements as the game is played in real life. A sequel to the book titled Zathura was released in 2002. The book was adapted into a 1995 film of the same name and it spawned a franchise that includes three sequels and an animated television series.

Mark Helprin

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<i>The Polar Express</i>

The Polar Express is a children's book written and illustrated by Chris Van Allsburg and published by Houghton Mifflin in 1985. The book is now widely considered to be a classic Christmas story for young children. It was praised for its detailed illustrations and calm, relaxing storyline. For the work, Van Allsburg won the annual Caldecott Medal for illustration of an American children's picture book in 1986, his second.

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<i>Zathura</i>

Zathura is a 2002 illustrated children's book by the American author Chris Van Allsburg. In the story, two boys are drawn into an intergalactic adventure when their house is magically hurled through space. The book is a standalone spinoff to the 1981 children's picture book Jumanji, also by Van Allsburg, and visual and textual references are made to Jumanji in the story. The book was adapted into a film, titled Zathura: A Space Adventure, in 2005.

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<i>The Mysteries of Harris Burdick</i>

The Mysteries of Harris Burdick is a 1984 picture book by the American author Chris Van Allsburg. It consists of a series of images, ostensibly created by Harris Burdick, a man who has mysteriously disappeared. Each image is accompanied by a title and a single line of text, which encourage readers to create their own stories. Many famous writers have tried to put their own twists on the pictures.

<i>Zathura: A Space Adventure</i> 2005 film by Jon Favreau

Zathura: A Space Adventure is a 2005 American science fiction adventure film directed by Jon Favreau. It is an adaptation of the 2002 children's book Zathura by Chris Van Allsburg, author of the 1981 children's book Jumanji. It is a standalone spin-off of the 1995 film Jumanji and the second installment of the Jumanji franchise. The film stars Josh Hutcherson, Jonah Bobo, Dax Shepard, Kristen Stewart, and Tim Robbins.

<i>Jumanji</i> 1995 film by Joe Johnston

Jumanji is a 1995 American fantasy adventure film directed by Joe Johnston. It is loosely based on the 1981 children's book by Chris Van Allsburg and the first installment of the Jumanji franchise. The film was written by Van Allsburg, Greg Taylor, Jonathan Hensleigh, and Jim Strain and stars Robin Williams, Kirsten Dunst, David Alan Grier, Bonnie Hunt, Jonathan Hyde, and Bebe Neuwirth.

<i>The Garden of Abdul Gasazi</i>

The Garden of Abdul Gasazi (ISBN 0-395-27804-X) is a best-selling children's picture book written in 1979 by the American author Chris Van Allsburg. The Garden of Abdul Gasazi was the first book written by Van Allsburg, for which he won a Caldecott Honor in 1980.

David Wiesner

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<i>A Visit to William Blakes Inn</i>

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Zathura may refer to:

<i>Jumanji</i> (franchise) American media franchise

Jumanji is an American media franchise, based on the children's books Jumanji (1981) and its sequel Zathura (2002), written by American Chris Van Allsburg. The franchise is originally owned by TriStar Pictures since the first film, but the Zathura spin-off and the original film’s direct sequels are currently owned by Columbia Pictures; both studios are a subsidiary of Sony Pictures.

References

  1. "Chris Van Allsburg". Scholastic.com. Archived from the original on April 12, 2011. Retrieved November 18, 2011.
  2. "Caldecott Medal & Honor Books, 1938–Present". Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC). American Library Association (ALA).
      "The Randolph Caldecott Medal". ALSC. ALA. Retrieved July 22, 2013.
  3. "Candidates for the Hans Christian Andersen Awards 1956–2002". The Hans Christian Andersen Awards, 1956–2002. IBBY. Gyldendal. 2002. Pages 110–18. Hosted by Austrian Literature Online (literature.at). Retrieved July 22, 2013.
  4. Mehren, Elizabeth (December 12, 1995). "'Jumanji' Author Getting Aboard Hollywood Express". Los Angeles Times.
  5. "Biography". ChrisVanAllsburg.com. Retrieved November 18, 2011.
  6. "Chris Van Allsburg – The Polar Express".
  7. Bloom, Nate (November 12, 2004). "Celebrity Jews" . Retrieved November 18, 2011.