Flag of El Salvador

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El Salvador
Flag of El Salvador.svg
Name Bandera Magna (Magna flag) (in Spanish)
Use State and war flag, naval ensign FIAV 011001.svg FIAV normal.svg
Proportion189:335, [1] approximately 9:16
AdoptedMay 27, 1912
DesignA horizontal triband of cobalt blue (top and bottom) and white with the National Coat of Arms in the center and occupying the entire width of the white stripe with its top touching the upper blue strip and its base touching the lower blue stripe.
Civil Flag of El Salvador.svg
Variant flag of El Salvador
Use Civil flag FIAV 100000.svg FIAV normal.svg
Proportion3:5
DesignA horizontal triband of white within cobalt blue
Civil Ensign of El Salvador.svg
Variant flag of El Salvador
Use State and war flag, civil and state ensign FIAV 011110.svg FIAV normal.svg
Proportion3:5
DesignA horizontal triband of white within cobalt blue, the words "DIOS UNION LIBERTAD" in golden amber centered and occupying almost the entire length and width of the white stripe

The flag of El Salvador features a horizontal triband of cobalt blue-white-cobalt blue, with the coat of arms centered and entirely contained within the central white stripe. This design of a triband of blue-white-blue is commonly used among Central American countries. Along with Haiti, Afghanistan, Bolivia, Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, and Venezuela, it is one of only eight national flags which has a depiction of its flag within the flag itself. [2]

Contents

Features

The national flag of El Salvador stands behind the President of El Salvador, Nayib Bukele Nayib Bukele 2.jpg
The national flag of El Salvador stands behind the President of El Salvador, Nayib Bukele
Coat of arms of El Salvador Coat of arms of El Salvador.svg
Coat of arms of El Salvador
El Salvador's cobalt blue color scheme hue falls between Hex 024BFB and Hex 0F45D2
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Hex 024BFB
Hex 0F45D2 Flag of El Salvador.svg
El Salvador's cobalt blue color scheme hue falls between Hex 024BFB and Hex 0F45D2
  Hex 024BFB
  Hex 0F45D2
Any additional appendages on the flag are in golden Amber (color) Gold Foil Metallic Texture Free Creative Commons (6962328289).jpg
Any additional appendages on the flag are in golden Amber (color)

The colors signify:

The five rowed volcanos in the coat of arms were inspired by the Cordillera de Apaneca volcanic range when El Salvador's Sonsonate City was the second capital of the Federal Republic of Central America in 1834. Salcoatitan, El Salvador - panoramio (9).jpg
The five rowed volcanos in the coat of arms were inspired by the Cordillera de Apaneca volcanic range when El Salvador's Sonsonate City was the second capital of the Federal Republic of Central America in 1834.

The blue hue is a vivid, lustrous and luscious rich solid cobalt blue. In the center of and occupying the entire width of the white stripe is the coat of arms with its top touching the upper blue strip and its base touching the lower blue stripe. The coat of arms contains the in bold golden amber words "REPÚBLICA DE EL SALVADOR EN LA AMÉRICA CENTRAL" (English: Republic of El Salvador in Central America). There are two variant flags, one without the coat of arms, and the other with the words "DIOS UNIÓN LIBERTAD" (English: God, Union, Liberty) in bold golden amber in place of the coat of arms. All three contain the same cobalt blue and white stripes, occasionally with a gold Fringe (trim). The main flag has an aspect ratio of 189:335 while the variants are both 3:5. [3]

From 1865 to 1912, a different flag was in use, with a field of alternating cobalt blue and white stripes and a red canton containing stars. The designs of both sides of the flag are different; at the reverse side, it shows the then national coat of arms at the position of stars at obverse. The stars symbolized the provinces of the Republic; once a new province was created, one star was add to the obverse of the flag. This "Star-Striped" banner was considered to be inspired by the flag of the United States.

The blue stripes symbolize the ocean and sky. The white means Peace. Blue is an important color in Salvadoran culture and identity. It started with Native American cultures of Mesoamerica in El Salvador, that produced (añil) indigo plant which they used extracts to produce blue dyes. When the Europeans invaded and colonized the area, they saw the wealth of indigo and turned El Salvador to one of the world's foremost providers of indigo dye in its time.

Many other countries in Central America use blue and white colors

" The Maya People ".jpg
MayanCalendar.png
Mesoamerican civilizations in El Salvador cultivated "añil"(Indigo), and used its blue dye extracts for many purposes.

Synonymous to the country's wealth, the colonizers referred to the dye as "the blue gold", that dominated El Salvador's economy until it was completely replaced by coffee cultivation. Today El Salvador remains as one of the few countries in the world that still cultivates indigo to produce blue dyes. Over time El Salvador's flag has had several different shades of blue, from the lightest to darkest, including Royal blue, Klein Blue and Indigo dye. The present current modern flag displays a cobalt blue color.

Historical coat of arms of El Salvador

Historical flags of El Salvador

Historic Salvadoran flag displays

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Coat of arms of Chile

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Coat of arms of Venezuela

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Coat of arms of the Dominican Republic

The coat of arms of the Dominican Republic features a shield in similarly quartered colors as the flag, supported by a bay laurel branch (left) and a palm frond (right); above the shield, a blue ribbon displays the national motto: Dios, Patria, Libertad. Below the shield, the words República Dominicana appear on a red ribbon. In the center of the shield, flanked by six spears, the front four holding the national flag, is a Bible with a small golden cross above it. The coat of arms appears in the center of the flag of the Dominican Republic.

Coat of arms of El Salvador

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Flag of Mexico National flag

The flag of Mexico is a vertical tricolor of green, white, and red with the national coat of arms charged in the center of the white stripe. While the meaning of the colors has changed over time, these three colors were adopted by Mexico following independence from Spain during the country's War of Independence, and subsequent First Mexican Empire. The form of the coat of arms was most recently revised in 1968, but the overall design has been used since 1821, when the First National Flag was created.

Flag of the Second Spanish Republic

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Flag of Puerto Rico The official flag of Puerto Rico since 1952

The flag of Puerto Rico represents and symbolizes Puerto Rico and its people.

References

  1. "Flag of El Salvador". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2018-10-13.
  2. Minahan, James. (2010). The complete guide to national symbols and emblems. Santa Barbara, Calif.: Greenwood Press. ISBN   978-0-313-34496-1. OCLC   436221284.
    • Art.7. "La bandera magna será de tres metros treinta y cinco centímetros de largo por un metro ochenta y nueve centímetros de ancho, en la cual irá dibujado el Escudo de Armas con todos sus blasones." (The greater flag is 3m 35cm long and 1m 89cm wide and includes the entire national coat of arms)
    • Art.9. "La bandera de uso en edificios y oficinas públicos, será de un metro de largo por sesenta centímetros de ancho (..) En la franja del centro llevará la leyenda: DIOS UNION LIBERTAD" (The flag for use at public buildings is 1m long by 60cm wide (..) The central stripe shall bear the inscription 'Dios Union Libertad')
    • Art.11. "La bandera de desfiles deberá medir un metro cuarenta y cinco centímetros de largo por noventa centímetros de ancho (..) La franja blanca de la bandera para desfiles, llevará en letras doradas la inscripción: DIOS UNION LIBERTAD" (The flag for use at parades will be 1.45m long by 90cm wide (..) The white stripe of the flag for parades shall bear in golden letters the inscription 'Dios Union Libertad')
    - Ley de Símbolos Patrios Archived 2016-03-13 at the Wayback Machine