Haycock Mountain

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Haycock Mountain
Haycock Mountain.jpg
Haycock Mountain
Highest point
Elevation 974 feet (297 m) [1]
Prominence 400 ft (120 m) [1]
Coordinates 40°29′19″N75°13′9″W / 40.48861°N 75.21917°W / 40.48861; -75.21917 Coordinates: 40°29′19″N75°13′9″W / 40.48861°N 75.21917°W / 40.48861; -75.21917 [2]
Geography
USA Pennsylvania location map.svg
Red triangle with thick white border.svg
Haycock Mountain
Topo map USGS Riegelsville [2]
Geology
Age of rock Triassic [3]
Mountain type Intrusive igneous / trap rock
Climbing
Easiest route Hike

Haycock Mountain is a locally prominent hill with the highest summit in Bucks County. It rises above Nockamixon State Park, in the Delaware River drainage of southeastern Pennsylvania. [1] Early settlers named it simply for its "resemblance to a cock of hay." [4]

Haycock is covered with numerous triassic diabase boulders, and is a bouldering destination with many established routes ranging from V0 to V10+. [3] To the north northwest of the main peak is a secondary peak of approximately 820 feet (250 m)sometimes known as 'Little Haycock', and the main peak overlooks Lake Nockamixon to the southeast.

Contained within the Tohickon Creek watershed, Haycock Mountain is drained by Dimple Creek to the west and Haycock Creek to the east. [5]

Since it lies within State Game Land Number 157, Haycock is used seasonally for hunting. [6]

Geology

Haycock Mountain was formed 200 million years ago by an intrusion of magma into local shale and argillite within the Newark Basin. As the magma cooled it became a large mass of erosion resistant diabase below the surface. Millions of years of weathering then stripped away overlying layers of shale and argillite to expose the durable diabase to the surface, creating Haycock mountain as it appears today. [7]

In addition to diabase, Haycock Mountain features a large area underlain by hornfels, or local sedimentary rock that has been baked by the heat of the magma intrusion. The baked rock is most prominent within a few hundred feet of the intrusion, appearing as a dark gray hornfels. However, the magma's heat was extensive enough to produce maroon hornfels nearly a mile away. [7]

Related Research Articles

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Ringing rocks Rocks that resonate like a bell when struck

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Tohickon Creek river in the United States of America

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Nockamixon State Park State park in Pennsylvania, United States

Nockamixon State Park is a Pennsylvania state park on 5,283 acres (2,138 ha) in Bedminster and Haycock Townships in northern Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in the United States. The park is one of the most popular in southeastern Pennsylvania, with most tourists visiting in the summer months.

Sourland Mountain mountain in United States of America

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Ralph Stover State Park

Ralph Stover State Park is a Pennsylvania state park on 45 acres (18 ha) in Plumstead and Tinicum Townships, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is a very popular destination for whitewater kayaking on Tohickon Creek and rock climbing on High Rocks. Ralph Stover State Park is two miles (3.2 km) north of Point Pleasant near Pennsylvania Route 32.

Cushetunk Mountain mountain in United States of America

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Robin Run

Robin Run is a dammed headwater major tributary of the Delaware River with a drainage area of 22.69 square miles that is 1.69 miles north 1.69 miles north of Mill Creek's Confluence with the Neshaminy Creek on the border of Buckingham and Wrightstown Townships), The headwaters originate in Buckingham Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania and the stream flows generally southeast to its confluence with Mill Creek in Wrightstown Township.

Wolf Run (Tohickon Creek tributary)

Deep Run is a tributary of the Tohickon Creek in Bedminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States.

Mink Run (Tohickon Creek tributary)

Mink Run is a tributary of the Tohickon Creek in Bedminster Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States.

Haycock Creek (Tohickon Creek tributary)

Haycock Creek is a tributary of the Tohickon Creek in Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States and is part of the Delaware River watershed.

Threemile Run (Tohickon Creek tributary)

Threemile Run is a tributary of the Tohickon Creek in Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States and is part of the Delaware River watershed.

Dimple Creek (Tohickon Creek tributary)

Dimple Creek is a tributary of the Tohickon Creek in Haycock Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States. It is part of the Delaware River watershed.

Beaver Run (Tohickon Creek tributary)

Beaver Run is a tributary of the Tohickon Creek in Milford Township and Richland Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States and is part of the Delaware River watershed.

Tinicum Creek (Delaware River tributary)

Tinicum Creek is a tributary of the Delaware River in Tinicum Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States.

Rapp Creek (Tinicum Creek tributary)

Rapp Creek is a tributary of Tinicum Creek in Nockamixon Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States. Rapp Creek is part of the Delaware River watershed.

Falls Creek (Delaware River tributary)

Falls Creek is a tributary of the Delaware River wholly contained in Bridgeton Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States. The creek boasts the highest falls in Bucks County.

Gallows Run (Delaware River tributary)

Gallows Run is a tributary of the Delaware River in Springfield and Nockamixon Townships, in Bucks County, Pennsylvania in the United States.

Cooks Creek (Delaware River tributary) watercourse in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, United States

Cooks Creek is a tributary of the Delaware River in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, in the United States, rising in Springfield Township and passing through Durham Township before emptying into the Pennsylvania Canal and the Delaware.

Applebachsville, Pennsylvania Populated place in Pennsylvania, United States

Applebachsville is a populated place in Haycock Township, Bucks County, Pennsylvania 2.6 miles (4.2 km) northeast of Richlandtown.

References

  1. 1 2 3 "Haycock Mountain, Pennsylvania". Peakbagger.com. Retrieved 2009-01-19.
  2. 1 2 "Haycock Mountain". Geographic Names Information System . United States Geological Survey . Retrieved 2018-08-02.
  3. 1 2 "Rock Climbing Routes in Haycock Mtn, Southeastern Region". Rockclimbing.com. Retrieved 2009-01-19.
  4. Quoted at "'A great local spot'". phillyBurbs.com. Archived from the original on 2007-08-17. Retrieved 2009-01-19. from Davis, W.W.H. (1876). History of Bucks County, Pennsylvania. Doylestown, Pennsylvania: Democrat Book and Job Office Print.
  5. "The National Map". TNM download. U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Department of the Interior. Retrieved 8 August 2018.
  6. "Mapping - State Game Land 157". Pennsylvania Game Commission website. Retrieved 2009-01-19.[ dead link ]
  7. 1 2 Inners, Jon D. Pennsylvania Trail of Geology - Nockamixon State Park, Bucks County: Rocks and Joints. Prepared by the Bureau of Topographic and Geologic Survey for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. Last updated 2008.