Jerry Glanville

Last updated

Jerry Glanville
JerryGlanvilleFeb09.jpg
Glanville in February 2009
Conquerors
Position: Head coach
Personal information
Born: (1941-10-14) October 14, 1941 (age 79)
Perrysburg, Ohio
Career information
College: Northern Michigan
Career history
As a coach:
Head coaching record
Regular season:60–69 (.465)
Postseason:3–4 (.429)
Career:63–73 (.463) (NFL)
9–24 (.273) (college)

Jerry Michael Glanville (born October 14, 1941) is an American football coach who is the head coach of the Conquerors of The Spring League. He played football at Northern Michigan University in the early 1960s, and is a former NASCAR driver and owner, and sportscaster. He served as head coach of the Houston Oilers from 1986 to 1990 and the Atlanta Falcons from 1990 to 1994, compiling a career NFL record of 6373. From 2007 to 2009, he was the Head Football Coach at Portland State University, tallying a mark of 924. Glanville has worked as an analyst on HBO's Inside the NFL , CBS's The NFL Today / NFL on CBS and Fox's coverage of the NFL. He has also raced on the Automobile Racing Club of America circuit. Glanville also briefly served as a consultant and liaison for the United Football League in 2011.

Contents

While head coach of the Houston Oilers, Glanville coined the now-famous phrase "NFL means 'not for long'", while admonishing NFL back judge Jim Daopoulos for making what Glanville felt were bad calls. The exact quote is "This isn't college, you're not at a homecoming. This is N-F-L, which stands for 'not for long' when you make them fuckin' calls." The "NFL" line was in reference to the fact that Daopoulos was in his first year in the league, having previously worked in college football. [1]

Playing career

Glanville played college football as a middle linebacker at Northern Michigan University, graduating in 1964 with a bachelor's degree. He also holds a master's degree from Western Kentucky University, where he worked as an assistant football coach on campus and roomed with fellow former NFL coach Joe Bugel. The two were known for drawing football plays on pizza boxes.

Coaching career

National Football League

During Glanville's time in the National Football League he was the special teams/defensive assistant for the Detroit Lions from 19741976, the secondary coach for the Atlanta Falcons from 19771978 and the Falcons defensive coordinator from 1979–1982, the secondary coach of the Buffalo Bills in 1983, the defensive coordinator of the then Houston Oilers from 1984–1985 and then head coach from 1985–1989 (initially being the interim coach after the firing of Hugh Campbell, and then being the permanent replacement starting in 1986), and head coach of the Atlanta Falcons from 1990–1993.

Houston Oilers

As head coach of the Oilers from 1985 to 1989, Glanville was famous for often leaving tickets at will-call for Elvis Presley (who by that point had been dead for over a decade), wearing all black to be easily recognized by his players, and driving replicas of vehicles driven by actor James Dean. Glanville's Oilers were an aggressive, hard-hitting team (to the point of resorting to cheap shots in the eyes of their opponents). During his tenure, the Astrodome was nicknamed "The House of Pain" due to both the Oilers' hard-hitting style and the often painfully high decibel levels which were typical of Oilers home games. Glanville often feuded with AFC Central Division rival head coaches Sam Wyche and Marty Schottenheimer. He received a highly publicized post-game dressing down from Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Chuck Noll during the customary postgame handshake after the Oilers defeated the Steelers in the Houston Astrodome during the 1987 season.

Glanville turned the Oilers, a team that had struggled through most of the 1980s, into an aggressive, hard-hitting group that preached a "hit the beach" mentality, and he made players such as future Hall of Fame QB Warren Moon into household names. During Glanville's tenure, the Oilers made three playoff appearances (which happened to be during his last three seasons), twice playing in the AFC divisional round. His final game with the Oilers was the 1989 AFC Wild Card game, played on December 31, 1989. Glanville's 1989 squad finished its season with consecutive losses against the Bengals in Cincinnati (61–7), at home against the Cleveland Browns in the final seconds in a game that decided the AFC Central title (24–20), and at home in the playoffs against the Steelers (26–23 in overtime). Had the Oilers defeated Pittsburgh, Glanville would have spent January 6, 1990, preparing the team to play at Denver and, possibly, play for its first AFC Championship Game berth in a decade. Instead, Glanville was fired that day. [2] To replace him, Oilers owner K. S. "Bud" Adams hired University of Houston head coach and former Redskins and Bears head coach Jack Pardee. [3]

Atlanta Falcons

Roughly one week after his firing by the Oilers, Glanville was hired to become the head coach of the Atlanta Falcons (1990–1993). [4] He had been a defensive coordinator for the Falcons, best known for developing the famous "Gritz Blitz" defense that featured rushing multiple players on the defensive side of the football against opposing offenses. The brash Glanville, as well as fan favorites such as cornerback/return specialist Deion Sanders, generated a great deal of excitement in Atlanta. A perfect preseason in 1990 raised expectations prior to the first game of the season, against Glanville's former team, the Oilers. The host Falcons withstood a furious rally and scored on a late pick-six by Sanders. Atlanta defeated the Oilers, 47–27. [5]

Glanville claimed with Atlanta he inherited a "flat-tire," but would take the team to the playoffs in the 1991 season, ending a nine-year playoff drought. Season highlights included a season sweep of the division rival 49ers, which cost San Francisco a playoff spot despite both teams finishing 10–6; and the Falcons' first playoff victory since 1978 and only the second playoff win in the franchise's 26-year history. The season ended with a loss to the eventual Super Bowl champion Washington Redskins in the divisional round. During his time with the Falcons, the team would pitch a "Back in Black" motto with new all-black uniforms and the same aggressive type play on defense, an offensive system known as the "Red Gun" that would implement most of the principles associated with the Run-N-Shoot offense, and an emphasis on special teams as he had done in Houston. The Falcons featured talented players such as future Hall of Fame CB "Prime Time" Deion Sanders and were known for unorthodox antics. Expectations were high after the success of the 1991 season and after the Falcons vacated Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium for the Georgia Dome, but the team's consecutive 6–10 records for 1992 and 1993 led the Falcons to dismiss Glanville in early 1994. He was out of football until he became the University of Hawaii's defensive coordinator over a decade later. His career record as an NFL head coach is 63–73.

Glanville vehemently opposed Falcons general manager Ken Herock's selection of Brett Favre in the second round of the 1991 NFL Draft, citing Favre's personal issues with alcohol and his party lifestyle. He said it would take a plane crash for him to put Favre into a game. Glanville also was known to place $100 bets (with Favre and others) on whether or not Favre could throw a football into the third deck of stadiums before games. Favre only threw four passes during his one season with Atlanta, then was traded to the Green Bay Packers in the 1992 off-season for a first-round draft pick. Glanville claimed the trade was a wake-up call for Favre, who was known for even being late to the team picture during his rookie season with the Falcons. [6] Favre went on to play 19 seasons in the NFL, starting every game from September 20, 1992 to December 5, 2010 and becoming the first NFL player to win three AP MVP awards, as well as the first player to throw for 70,000 passing yards and 500 touchdowns. He would also appear in two Super Bowls, winning Super Bowl XXXI.

United Football League

On March 21, 2011, the Hartford Colonials of the United Football League announced that Glanville would serve as the team's head coach and general manager. [7] The Colonials suspended operations in August of that year; Glanville would remain with the league as a consultant, color commentator for the league's television broadcasts, and liaison for potential expansion markets. Glanville left the league after one season.

College football

Glanville was formerly the defensive coordinator for the University of Hawaii's football team, working under his former offensive coordinator (and eventual successor) at Atlanta, June Jones, for two seasons. [8] Prior to his tenure at the University of Hawaii, Glanville's earlier involvement with college football was the defensive ends/outside linebackers coach at Georgia Tech from 1968–1973 and the defensive coordinator at Western Kentucky University in 1967, shortly after his own career as a player had ended.

On February 28, 2007, Glanville accepted the head coaching position at Portland State University (PSU), his first college head coaching job. [9] Glanville, who replaced Tim Walsh, was the program's 12th head coach in their history. He resigned this position with the support of the university on November 17, 2009, with an overall record of 9–24 during his tenure. [9]

Return to coaching

On February 23, 2018, Glanville was named defensive coordinator for the Hamilton Tiger-Cats of the Canadian Football League (CFL). [10] He left the team after the 2018 season for personal reasons. [11]

In 2019, he was hired by Marc Trestman as the defensive coordinator for the Tampa Bay Vipers of the XFL. [12] [13] Glanville was named head coach of the Conquerors of The Spring League on October 15, 2020. [14]

Racing career

Jerry Glanville
NASCAR Xfinity Series career
6 races run over 2 years
Best finish65th (1992)
First race 1992 Roses Stores 300 (Orange County)
Last race 1993 Havoline 250 (Milwaukee)
WinsTop tens Poles
000
NASCAR Camping World Truck Series career
27 races run over 5 years
Best finish18th (1995)
First race 1995 Skoal Bandit Copper World Classic (Phoenix)
Last race 1999 Pennzoil/VIP Discount Auto Center 200 (Loudon)
WinsTop tens Poles
000

Glanville began racing by learning from seven-time Winston Cup Series champion Dale Earnhardt, who would mentor Glanville in tests at Richmond International Raceway. [15] Glanville officially started his racing career in the NASCAR Busch Grand National Series in 1992 for Lewis Cooper with sponsorship from the Falcons. After failing to qualify in his first career attempt at Lanier Speedway, he made his series debut at Orange County Speedway, finishing 22nd. [16] He ran six races during his three-year timespan in the series, with a best finish of 20th at Volusia County Speedway in 1992. [17] Glanville returned to the series in 1999, but failed to qualify for all five races he attempted. [18]

He later ran in the ARCA Hooters SuperCar Series, [19] running ten races in 1994 as an owner/driver of the No. 81, and recorded a best finish of ninth at I-70 Speedway. [20] Glanville returned to ARCA in 2000, running a part-time schedule until 2004 for his and Norm Benning's teams, his best finish being fourth at Nashville Superspeedway in 2002. [21]

In 1995, he participated in the Skoal Bandit Copper World Classic, the inaugural SuperTruck Series race, [22] and finished 27th. [23] He continued racing in the Truck Series from 1995–1999, with a best finish of 14th three times.

In addition to the Busch and Truck Series, Glanville competed in the NASCAR Slim Jim All Pro Series in 1996, finishing 23rd at Gresham Motorsports Park. [24] He later raced in the Winston West Series, his debut coming in 1997 at Pikes Peak International Raceway, where he finished seventh. [25] From 1997–1999, he ran eight races in the Hooters Pro Cup, with a best finish of 12th at Southampton Speedway. [26]

Glanville was also working for CBS Sports during this period, mainly as an NFL studio analyst. Glanville also called several NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series races on CBS/TNN during this period, mainly as a race analyst in the booth.

In media

The Sega Genesis system offered Jerry Glanville's PigSkin Footbrawl, a medieval-themed arcade-style football game. The game was a port of the 1990 classic arcade game Pigskin 621 A.D. , released by Bally Midway. Glanville provided soundbites for the game. [27]

Head coaching record

National Football League

TeamYearRegular SeasonPost Season
WonLostTiesWin %FinishWonLostWin %Result
HOU 1985 020.0004th in AFC Central
HOU 1986 5110.3134th in AFC Central
HOU 1987 960.6002nd in AFC Central11.500Lost to Denver Broncos in Divisional Playoff.
HOU 1988 1060.6253rd in AFC Central11.500Lost to Buffalo Bills in Divisional Playoff.
HOU 1989 970.5632nd in AFC Central01.000Lost to Pittsburgh Steelers in Wild Card Game.
HOU Total33320.50823.400
ATL 1990 5110.3134th in NFC West
ATL 1991 1060.6252nd in NFC West11.500Lost to Washington Redskins in Divisional Playoff.
ATL 1992 6100.3753rd in NFC West
ATL 1993 6100.3753rd in NFC West
ATL Total27370.42211.500
Total [28] 60690.46534.429

College

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffs
Portland State Vikings (Big Sky Conference)(2007–2009)
2007 Portland State3–83–5T6th
2008 Portland State4–73–5T6th
2009 Portland State2–91–78th
Portland State:9–247–17
Total:9–24

Motorsports career results

NASCAR

(key) (Bold – Pole position awarded by qualifying time. Italics – Pole position earned by points standings or practice time. * – Most laps led.)

Busch Series

NASCAR Busch Series results
YearTeamNo.Make1234567891011121314151617181920212223242526272829303132NBSCPts
1992 Speedway Motorsports 56 Buick DAY CAR RCH ATL MAR DAR BR HCY LAN
DNQ
DUB NZH CLT DOV ROU
22
MYB
28
GLN VOL
20
NHA TAL IRP ROU MCH NHA BRI DAR RCH DOV CLT MAR CAR HCY 65th279
1993 Glanville Motorsports 81 Ford DAY CAR
40
RCH DAR BRI HCY
DNQ
ROU
DNQ
MAR NZH CLT DOV MYB
27
GLN MLW
26
TAL IRP MCH NHA BRI DAR RCH DOV ROU CLT MAR CAR HCY ATL
QL
67th210
1994 DAY CAR RCH ATL MAR DAR HCY
DNQ
BRI ROU NHA NZH CLT DOV MYB GLN MLW SBO TAL HCY IRP MCH BRI DAR RCH DOV CLT MAR CAR NA-
1999 Glanville Motorsports 81 Chevy DAY CAR LVS
DNQ
ATL DAR TEX NSV BRI TAL CAL
DNQ
NHA RCH NZH CLT DOV
DNQ
SBO GLN MLW
DNQ
MYB PPR
DNQ
GTY IRP MCH BRI DAR RCH DOV CLT CAR MEM PHO HOM NA-
– Qualified but replaced by Ronald Cooper

Craftsman Truck Series

NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series results
YearTeamNo.Make123456789101112131415161718192021222324252627NCTCPts
1995 Glanville Motorsports 81 Ford PHO
27
TUS
14
SGS
19
MMR
DNQ
POR
18
EVG
22
I70
25
LVL
14
BRI
22
MLW
21
CNS
18
HPT
32
IRP
18
FLM
17
RCH
22
MAR NWS SON MMR PHO 18th1482
1996 HOM
22
PHO
20
POR EVG TUS
22
CNS
22
HPT BRI NZH MLW
14
LVL I70 IRP FLM GLN NSV RCH NHA MAR NWS SON MMR PHO LVS 43rd515
1997 WDW TUS HOM
DNQ
PHO
32
POR EVG I70 NHA TEX BRI NZH MLW
29
LVL CNS HPT IRP FLM NSV GLN RCH MAR SON MMR CAL PHO LVS 92nd150
1998 WDW HOM PHO
INQ
POR EVG I70 GLN TEX BRI MLW
DNQ
NZH CAL
26
PPR
36
IRP NHA FLM NSV
DNQ
HPT LVL RCH MEM GTY MAR SON MMR PHO LVS 61st223
1999 HOM PHO
24
EVG MMR MAR MEM PPR
27
I70 BRI TEX PIR GLN MLW
26
NSV NZH MCH NHA
23
IRP GTY HPT RCH LVS LVL TEX CAL 47th352
– Qualified but replaced by Randy Nelson

ARCA Re/Max Series

(key) (Bold – Pole position awarded by qualifying time. Italics – Pole position earned by points standings or practice time. * – Most laps led.)

ARCA Re/Max Series results
YearTeamNo.Make12345678910111213141516171819202122232425ARMCPts
1994 Glanville Motorsports 81 Ford DAY TAL
29
FIF
15
LVL
14
KIL
22
TOL
11
FRS
13
MCH
15
DMS
9
POC
29
POC KIL FRS INF I70
8
ISF DSF TOL SLM WIN ATL 18th1745
2000 Glanville Motorsports 81 Ford DAY SLM AND CLT
27
KIL FRS MCH
34
POC TOL
27
KEN BLN POC WIN ISF KEN DSF SLM CLT TAL ATL 78th250
2001 DAY NSH WIN SLM GTY KEN
10
CLT
35
KAN MCH
4
POC MEM GLN KEN
19
MCH
6
POC NSH ISF CHI DSF SLM TOL BLN CLT TAL ATL 46th790
2002 DAY ATL NSH
4
SLM KEN
19
CLT
18
KAN
37
POC MCH
35
TOL SBO KEN
6
BLN POC NSH
10
ISF WIN DSF CHI SLM TAL CLT 31st965
2003 Dodge DAY ATL NSH
6
SLM TOL KEN
DNQ
CLT BLN KAN MCH LER POC POC NSH ISF WIN DSF CHI SLM TAL CLT SBO 113th225
2004 Norm Benning Racing 8 Dodge DAY NSH SLM KEN TOL CLT KAN POC MCH
23
SBO BLN KEN GTW POC LER NSH ISF TOL DSF CHI SLM TAL 150th115

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