Juicer

Last updated
Electric centrifugal juicer Karottensaft.JPG
Electric centrifugal juicer

A juicer, also known as a juice extractor, is a tool used to extract juice from fruits, herbs, leafy greens and other types of vegetables in a process called juicing. [1] It crushes, grinds, and/or squeezes the juice out of the pulp. [2]

Contents

Some types of juicers can also function as a food processor. [3] Most of the twin gear and horizontal masticating juicers have attachments for crushing herbs and spices, extruding pasta, noodles or bread sticks, making baby food and nut butter, grinding coffee, making nut milk, etc.

Types

Reamers

A manual-styled squeezer is used to separate citrus' juice from its pulp. Juicer.jpg
A manual-styled squeezer is used to separate citrus' juice from its pulp.

Squeezers are used for squeezing juice from citrus such as grapefruits, lemons, limes, and oranges. [4] Juice is extracted by pressing or grinding a halved citrus along a juicer's ridged conical center and discarding the rind. Some reamers are stationary and require a user to press and turn the fruit, while others are electrical, automatically turning the ridged center when fruit is pressed upon.

Centrifugal juicers

A centrifugal juicer cuts up the fruit or vegetable with a flat cutting blade.[ citation needed ] It then spins the produce at a high speed to separate the juice from the pulp.

Masticating juicers

A masticating juicer known as cold press juicer or slow juicer uses a single auger to compact and crush produce into smaller sections before squeezing out its juice along a static screen while the pulp is expelled through a separate outlet.[ citation needed ]

Triturating juicers

Triturating juicers (twin gear juicers) have twin augers to crush and press produce.

Juicing press

A juicing press, such as a fruit press or wine press, is a larger scale press that is used in agricultural production. These presses can be stationary or mobile. A mobile press has the advantage that it can be moved from one orchard to another. The process is primarily used for apples and involves a stack of apple mash, wrapped in fine mesh cloth, which is then pressed under approx 40 tonnes. These machines are popular in Europe and have now been introduced to North America.

Steam juice extractor

A stovetop steam juice extractor is typically a pot to generate steam that is used to heat a batch of berries (or other fruit) in a perforated pot stacked on top of a juice collecting container that is above the steam pot. The juice is extracted without mechanical means so it is remarkably clear and because of the steam heating it is also pasteurized for long term storage.

See also

Related Research Articles

Orange juice Juice made from oranges

Orange juice is a liquid extract of the orange tree fruit, produced by squeezing or reaming oranges. It comes in several different varieties, including blood orange, navel oranges, valencia orange, clementine, and tangerine. As well as variations in oranges used, some varieties include differing amounts of juice vesicles, known as "pulp" in American English, and "(juicy) bits" in British English. These vesicles contain the juice of the orange and can be left in or removed during the manufacturing process. How juicy these vesicles are depend upon many factors, such as species, variety, and season. In American English, the beverage name is often abbreviated as "OJ".

Calamansi Species of plant

Calamansi, also known as calamondin, Philippine lime, or Philippine lemon, is an economically important citrus hybrid predominantly cultivated in the Philippines. It is native to the Philippines, Borneo, Sumatra, and Sulawesi in Indonesia in Southeast Asia, as well as southern China and Taiwan in East Asia. Calamansi is ubiquitous in traditional Filipino cuisine. It is naturally very sour, and is used in various condiments, beverages, dishes, marinades, and preserves. Calamansi is also used as an ingredient in Malaysian and Indonesian cuisines.

Winemaking Production of wine

Winemaking or vinification is the production of wine, starting with the selection of the fruit, its fermentation into alcohol, and the bottling of the finished liquid. The history of wine-making stretches over millennia. The science of wine and winemaking is known as oenology. A winemaker may also be called a vintner. The growing of grapes is viticulture and there are many varieties of grapes.

Juicing Process of extracting juice from fruit or vegetables

Juicing is the process of extracting juice from plant tissues such as fruit or vegetables.

Chewing Mechanical procedure for crushing the food and its first enzymatic splitting

Chewing or mastication is the process by which food is crushed and ground by teeth. It is the first step of digestion, and it increases the surface area of foods to allow a more efficient break down by enzymes. During the mastication process, the food is positioned by the cheek and tongue between the teeth for grinding. The muscles of mastication move the jaws to bring the teeth into intermittent contact, repeatedly occluding and opening. As chewing continues, the food is made softer and warmer, and the enzymes in saliva begin to break down carbohydrates in the food. After chewing, the food is swallowed. It enters the esophagus and via peristalsis continues on to the stomach, where the next step of digestion occurs. Increasing the number of chews per bite increases relevant gut hormones. Studies suggest that chewing may decrease self-reported hunger and food intake. Chewing gum has been around for many centuries; there is evidence that northern Europeans chewed birch bark tar 9,000 years ago.

Minute Maid American beverage company

Minute Maid is a product line of beverages, usually associated with lemonade or orange juice, but which now extends to soft drinks of different kinds, including Hi-C. Minute Maid is sold under the Cappy brand in Central Europe and under the brand "Моя Семья" in Russia and the Commonwealth of Independent States. Minute Maid was the first company to market frozen orange juice concentrate, allowing it to be distributed throughout the United States and served year-round. The Minute Maid Company is owned by The Coca-Cola Company, the world's largest marketer of fruit juices and drinks. The firm opened its headquarters in Sugar Land Town Square in Sugar Land, Texas, United States, on February 16, 2009; previously it was headquartered in the 2000 St. James Place building in Houston.

Vegetable juice

Vegetable juice is a juice drink made primarily of blended vegetables and also available in the form of powders. Vegetable juice is often mixed with fruits such as apples or grapes to improve flavor. It is often touted as a low-sugar alternative to fruit juice, although some commercial brands of vegetable juices use fruit juices as sweeteners, and may contain large amounts of sodium.

Olive oil extraction Process of extracting oil from olives

Olive oil extraction is the process of extracting the oil present in olive drupes, known as olive oil. Olive oil is produced in the mesocarp cells, and stored in a particular type of vacuole called a lipo vacuole, i.e., every cell contains a tiny olive oil droplet. Olive oil extraction is the process of separating the oil from the other fruit contents. It is possible to attain this separation by physical means alone, i.e., oil and water do not mix, so they are relatively easy to separate. This contrasts with other oils that are extracted with chemical solvents, generally hexane. The first operation when extracting olive oil is washing the olives, to reduce the presence of contaminants, especially soil which can create a particular flavor effect called "soil taste".

Grapefruit seed extract (GSE), also known as citrus seed extract, is a liquid extract derived from the seeds, pulp, and white membranes of grapefruit. GSE is prepared by grinding the grapefruit seed and juiceless pulp, then mixing with glycerin. Commercially available GSEs sold to consumers are made from the seed, pulp, and glycerin blended together. GSE is sold as a dietary supplement and is used in cosmetics.

Purée Cooked food that has been made into soft creamy paste

A purée is cooked food, usually vegetables, fruits or legumes, that has been ground, pressed, blended or sieved to the consistency of a creamy paste or liquid. Purées of specific foods are often known by specific names, e.g., applesauce or hummus. The term is of French origin, where it meant in Old French purified or refined.

Fruit preserves Preparations of fruits, sugar, and sometimes acid

Fruit preserves are preparations of fruits whose main preserving agent is sugar and sometimes acid, often stored in glass jars and used as a condiment or spread.

Citrus reamer

A citrus reamer, also known as a lemon reamer or simply a reamer, is a small kitchen utensil used to extract the juice from a lemon or other small citrus fruit.

Lemon squeezer Kitchen utensil

A lemon squeezer is a small kitchen utensil designed to extract juice from lemons or other citrus fruit such as oranges, grapefruit, or lime. It is designed to separate and crush the pulp of the fruit in a way that is easy to operate. Lemon squeezers can be made from any solid, acid-resistant material, such as plastic, glass, metal or ceramic.

Juice vesicles Component of citrus pulp

The juice vesicles, also known as citrus kernels, of a citrus fruit are the membranous content of the fruit's endocarp. All fruits from the Citranae subtribe, subfamily Aurantioideae, and family Rutaceae have juice vesicles. The vesicles contain the juice of the fruit and appear shiny and baglike. Vesicles come in two shapes: the superior and inferior, and these are distinct. Citrus fruit with more vesicles generally weighs more than those with fewer vesicles. Fruits with many segments, such as the grapefruit or pomelo, have more vesicles per segment than fruits with fewer segments, such as the kumquat and mandarin. Each vesicle in a segment in citrus fruits has approximately the same shape, size, and weight. About 5% of the weight of an average orange is made up of the membranes of the juice vesicles.

Pressing (wine) In winemaking, the process of extracting juice from grapes

Pressing in winemaking is the process where the juice is extracted from the grapes with the aid of a wine press, by hand, or even by the weight of the grape berries and clusters. Historically, intact grape clusters were trodden by feet but in most wineries today the grapes are sent through a crusher/destemmer, which removes the individual grape berries from the stems and breaks the skins, releasing some juice, prior to being pressed. There are exceptions, such as the case of sparkling wine production in regions such as Champagne where grapes are traditionally whole-cluster pressed with stems included to produce a lighter must that is low in phenolics.

Cider mill Location and equipment used to crush apples into apple juice for use in making apple cider

A cider mill, also known as a cidery, is the location and equipment used to crush apples into apple juice for use in making apple cider, hard cider, applejack, apple wine, pectin and other products derived from apples. More specifically, it refers to a device used to crush or grind apples as part of the overall juice production.

Juice Naturally-occurring liquid present in fruits and vegetables

Juice is a drink made from the extraction or pressing of the natural liquid contained in fruit and vegetables. It can also refer to liquids that are flavored with concentrate or other biological food sources, such as meat or seafood, such as clam juice. Juice is commonly consumed as a beverage or used as an ingredient or flavoring in foods or other beverages, as for smoothies. Juice emerged as a popular beverage choice after the development of pasteurization methods enabled its preservation without using fermentation. The largest fruit juice consumers are New Zealand and Colombia. Fruit juice consumption on average increases with country income level.

Oil mill

An oil mill is a grinding mill designed to crush or bruise oil-bearing seeds, such as linseed or peanuts, or other oil-rich vegetable material, such as olives or the fruit of the oil palm, which can then be pressed to extract vegetable oils, which may used as foods or for cooking, as oleochemical feedstocks, as lubricants, or as biofuels. The pomace or press cake – the remaining solid material from which the oil has been extracted – may also be used as a food or fertilizer.

Cold-pressed juice Juice extracted by hydraulic press

Cold-pressed juice is juice that uses a hydraulic press to extract juice from fruit and vegetables, as opposed to other methods such as centrifugal or single auger.

References

  1. "juicer : Encyclopedia : Food Network". www.foodterms.com. Retrieved 13 January 2017.
  2. "Cold Press vs. Traditional: Which Juicer Should You Buy?". The Huffington Post. 8 February 2013. Retrieved 13 January 2017.
  3. Farrell, Mary H J (28 August 2014). "You don't need a juicer to make juice". Consumer Reports. Retrieved 28 May 2019.
  4. National Reamer Collectors Association. "REAMERS: The Great American Kitchen Collectible" . Retrieved 20 June 2019.