Konawa, Oklahoma

Last updated
Konawa, Oklahoma
Konawa City Hall, Konawa, Oklahoma.jpg
Konawa City Hall
OKMap-doton-Konawa.PNG
Location of Konawa, Oklahoma
Coordinates: 34°57′33″N96°45′10″W / 34.95917°N 96.75278°W / 34.95917; -96.75278 Coordinates: 34°57′33″N96°45′10″W / 34.95917°N 96.75278°W / 34.95917; -96.75278
Country United States
State Oklahoma
County Seminole
Area
  Total1.4 sq mi (3.5 km2)
  Land1.4 sq mi (3.5 km2)
  Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation
965 ft (294 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total1,298
  Density927.1/sq mi (1,083.9/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
74849
Area code(s) 580
FIPS code 40-40200 [1]
GNIS feature ID1094430 [2]

Konawa is a city in Seminole County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 1,479 at the 2000 census. Konawa is a Seminole word meaning, "string of beads." [3]

Seminole County, Oklahoma County in the United States

Seminole County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 25,482. Its county seat is Wewoka. Before Oklahoma's admission as a state, the county was the entire small portion of Indian Territory allocated to the Seminole people, who were removed from Florida in the 1820s.

Oklahoma State of the United States of America

Oklahoma is a state in the South Central region of the United States, bordered by Kansas on the north, Missouri on the northeast, Arkansas on the east, Texas on the south, New Mexico on the west, and Colorado on the northwest. It is the 20th-most extensive and the 28th-most populous of the fifty United States. The state's name is derived from the Choctaw words okla and humma, meaning "red people". It is also known informally by its nickname, "The Sooner State", in reference to the non-Native settlers who staked their claims on land before the official opening date of lands in the western Oklahoma Territory or before the Indian Appropriations Act of 1889, which dramatically increased European-American settlement in the eastern Indian Territory. Oklahoma Territory and Indian Territory were merged into the State of Oklahoma when it became the 46th state to enter the union on November 16, 1907. Its residents are known as Oklahomans, and its capital and largest city is Oklahoma City.

2000 United States Census 22nd determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000

The Twenty-second United States Census, known as Census 2000 and conducted by the Census Bureau, determined the resident population of the United States on April 1, 2000, to be 281,421,906, an increase of 13.2% over the 248,709,873 people enumerated during the 1990 Census. This was the twenty-second federal census and was at the time the largest civilly administered peacetime effort in the United States.

Contents

History

Located in southwestern Seminole County, Konawa, a Seminole word meaning "string of beads," lies at the intersection of State Highways 9A and 39. On January 7, 1904, Tom West, a mixed-blood Seminole, sold George Northrup a plot of land that became the Konawa townsite. The post office was established on July 15, 1904, with Robert C. Lovelace as postmaster. Early-day establishments included the first newspaper, the Konawa Chief, hardware and drug stores, lumberyards, a blacksmith, and a bank. In 1903, the Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma Railroad (later the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway) bypassed the nearby town of Violet Springs. Most families and businesses moved to other towns. Some moved their houses to Konawa, and many of these buildings continued to stand at the turn of the twenty-first century. [3]

Konawa served as a trade center for a surrounding agricultural region. At 1907 statehood population stood at 620. The Konawa Leader has informed the citizens since 1917. During the 1920s streets were paved, several oil wells were discovered, and a new high school was built. In November 1931 Konawa caught the attention of Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd, who robbed the First National Bank. During World War II the Konawa National Guard Armory (National Register of Historical Places, NR 94000483), a Works Progress Administration project, housed German prisoners of war. On February 17, 1961, a tornado destroyed downtown Konawa and injured five individuals. [3]

The Sacred Heart Mission, which was the forerunner of St. Gregory's University [4] moved in 1876 from its original location in Atoka, Oklahoma to a location near Konawa and became an abbey and later a school. After a disastrous fire in 1901 that destroyed the school and the monastery, the monks accepted an offer from the town of Shawnee and began construction of the Catholic University of Oklahoma and St. Gregory's Abbey in 1910. In 1927, the abbey completely relocated from Konawa to Shawnee.

St. Gregorys University private, co-educational Catholic liberal arts university in Oklahoma, U.S.

St. Gregory's University was a private, co-educational Catholic liberal arts university. It was one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. It had its main campus in Shawnee, and an additional campus in Tulsa.

Atoka, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Atoka is a city in, and the county seat of, Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 3,107 at the 2010 census, an increase of 4.0 percent from 2,988 at the 2000 census.

Abbey monastery or convent, under the authority of an abbot or an abbess

An abbey is a complex of buildings used by members of a religious order under the governance of an abbot or abbess. It provides a place for religious activities, work, and housing of Christian monks and nuns.

The energy industry remained a mainstay of the local economy, with oil-field service companies still important. In May 1968 Oklahoma Gas and Electric Corporation broke ground for the Seminole Power Plant, creating the 1,350-acre Konawa Reservoir at a cost of $45 million. By 1975 the third power unit with an output of more than 1.6 million kilowatts was built. Konawa Reservoir is one of Oklahoma's top trophy lakes. [3]

Konawa Reservoir is a reservoir located in Seminole County, Oklahoma. The lake covers approximately 1,350 acres (5.5 km2) and has a capacity of 23,000 acre feet (28,000,000 m3). It is owned by Oklahoma Gas and Electric (OG&E) Company. and was constructed in 1968-70, to provide cooling for a nearby gas-fired electric power generation plant. It impounds Jumper Creek, about 2 miles (3.2 km) east of the city of Konawa, Oklahoma.

In August 1963 Konawa hosted its first All-Night Gospel Singing. During its heyday an estimated twenty-five thousand people attended the annual event. The town maintains a council-city manager type of government. At the turn of the twenty-first century Konawa had 1,479 residents. [3]

Geography

Konawa is located at 34°57′33″N96°45′10″W / 34.95917°N 96.75278°W / 34.95917; -96.75278 (34.959284, -96.752863). [5] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.4 square miles (3.6 km2), all of it land.

Climate

Climate is characterized by relatively high temperatures and evenly distributed precipitation throughout the year. Temperatures are high and can lead to warm, oppressive nights. Summers are usually somewhat wetter than winters, with much of the rainfall coming from convectional thunderstorm activity. The Köppen Climate Classification subtype for this climate is "Cfa" (Humid Subtropical Climate). [6]

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 701
1920 89627.8%
1930 2,070131.0%
1940 2,2056.5%
1950 2,70722.8%
1960 1,555−42.6%
1970 1,71910.5%
1980 1,711−0.5%
1990 1,508−11.9%
2000 1,479−1.9%
2010 1,298−12.2%
Est. 20151,290 [7] −0.6%
U.S. Decennial Census [8]

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,298 people residing in the city. The racial composition of the city is 64.5% White, 21.5% Native American, 9.6% from two or more races, 2.4% Black, 0.4% Pacific Islander and 0.2% Asian. 1.5% were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

As of the census [1] of 2000, there were 1,479 people, 551 households, and 360 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,083.9 people per square mile (419.9/km²). There were 657 housing units at an average density of 481.5 per square mile (186.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 70.11% White, 1.89% African American, 22.92% Native American, 0.20% Asian, 0.81% from other races, and 4.06% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.16% of the population.

There were 551 households out of which 35.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.0% were married couples living together, 16.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.5% were non-families. 31.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 16.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the city, the population was spread out with 28.9% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 25.2% from 25 to 44, 19.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females, there were 91.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 86.5 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $17,300, and the median income for a family was $23,375. Males had a median income of $21,771 versus $15,208 for females. The per capita income for the city was $10,474. About 31.2% of families and 31.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 42.4% of those under age 18 and 24.1% of those age 65 or over.

Related Research Articles

Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma County in the United States

Pottawatomie County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 69,442. Its county seat is Shawnee.

Indian Springs, Georgia CDP in Georgia, United States

Indian Springs is a census-designated place (CDP) in Catoosa County, Georgia, United States. The population was 1,982 at the 2000 census and 2,241 in 2010. It is part of the Chattanooga, TN–GA Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Walhalla Township is a township in Lake of the Woods County, Minnesota, United States. The population was 156 at the 2000 census.

Crete, Nebraska City in Nebraska, United States

Crete is a city in Saline County, Nebraska, United States. The population was 6,960 at the 2010 census.

Upham, North Dakota City in North Dakota, United States

Upham is a city in McHenry County, North Dakota, United States. The population was 130 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Minot Micropolitan Statistical Area. Upham was founded in 1905.

Tushka, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Tushka is a town in Atoka County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 312 at the 2010 census, a decline of 9.6 percent from 345 at the 2000 census.

Elgin, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Elgin is a city in northwestern Comanche County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,156 at the 2010 census, a 78 percent increase from 1,210 at the 2000 census. It is included in the Lawton, Oklahoma Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is the site of Fort Sill National Cemetery.

Kellyville, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Kellyville is a town in Creek County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 1,150 at the 2010 census, compared to 906 at the 2000 census.

Davenport, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Davenport is a town in Lincoln County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 881 at the 2000 census.

Prague, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Prague is a city in southeastern Lincoln County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,386 at the 2010 census, an 11.6 percent increase from 2,138 at the 2000 census. Czech immigrants founded the city, and named it for the capital of the Czech Republic with an altered pronunciation of the name.

Pittsburg, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Pittsburg is a town in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 280 at the 2000 census.

Asher, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Asher is a town in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 393 at the 2010 census, a decline of 6.2 percent from 419 at the 2000 census.

Bethel Acres, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Bethel Acres is a town in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 2,895 at the 2010 census, an increase of 5.9 percent from 2,735 at the 2000 census. It is primarily a bedroom community for people who work in the three nearby larger cities of Shawnee, Tecumseh and Oklahoma City.

Tecumseh, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Tecumseh is a city in Pottawatomie County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 6,457 at the 2010 census, a 5.9 percent increase from 6,098 at the 2000 census. It was named for the noted Shawnee chief, Tecumseh, and was designated as the county seat at Oklahoma's statehood. A county-wide election moved the seat to Shawnee in 1930.

Bowlegs, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Bowlegs is a town in Seminole County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 405 at the 2010 census.

Sasakwa, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Sasakwa is a town in Seminole County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was documented as 150 in both the 2010 and 2000 census.

Seminole, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Seminole is a city in Seminole County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 6,899 at the 2000 census. Seminole experienced a large population growth in the 1920s due to an oil boom.

Wewoka, Oklahoma City in Oklahoma, United States

Wewoka is a city in Seminole County, Oklahoma, United States. The population was 3,430 at the 2010 census. It is the county seat of Seminole County.

Maud, Oklahoma Town in Oklahoma, United States

Maud is a town on the boundary between Pottawatomie and Seminole counties in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. The population was 1,048 at the 2010 census, a 7.8 percent decrease from 1,136 at the 2000 census. The town was named for Maud Stearns, a sister to the wives of two men who owned the first general store.

References

  1. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  2. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 Konawa Genealogical Society, "Konawa," Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture. Accessed May 24, 2015.
  4. Sacred Heart Mission, Konawa Public Schools Archived 2006-11-07 at the Wayback Machine
  5. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  6. Climate Summary for Konawa
  7. "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Archived from the original on June 2, 2016. Retrieved July 2, 2016.
  8. "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.