List of North Carolina Tar Heels head football coaches

Last updated
Larry Fedora, 34th head coach of the North Carolina Tar Heels. Larry Fedora.jpg
Larry Fedora, 34th head coach of the North Carolina Tar Heels.

The North Carolina Tar Heels college football team represents the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the Coastal Division of the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). The Tar Heels compete as part of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I Football Bowl Subdivision. The program has had 34  head coaches, and one interim head coach, since it began play during the 1888 season. [1] [2] Since November 2018, Mack Brown has served as North Carolina's head coach. [3]

Contents

The Tar Heels have played more than 1,100 games over 122 seasons. [2] In that time, 10 coaches have led the Tar Heels in postseason bowl games: Carl Snavely, Jim Hickey, Bill Dooley, Dick Crum, Mack Brown, Carl Torbush, John Bunting, Butch Davis, Everett Withers, and Larry Fedora. [1] Four of those coaches also won conference championships: Snavely captured three as a member of the Southern Conference and Hickey, Dooley, and Crum won a combined five as a member of the ACC. [1]

Brown is the leader in games won (82) during his 12 years with the program. [4] Branch Bocock has the highest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .812. [4] Gene McEver has the lowest winning percentage of those who have coached more than one game, with .067. [4] Of the 33 different head coaches who have led the Tar Heels, Jim Tatum and Snavely have been inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame in South Bend, Indiana. [5] [6]

Key

Key to symbols in coaches list
GeneralOverallConferencePostseason [A 1]
No.Order of coaches [A 2] GCGames coachedCWConference winsPWPostseason wins
DCDivision championshipsOWOverall winsCLConference lossesPLPostseason losses
CCConference championshipsOLOverall lossesCTConference tiesPTPostseason ties
NCNational championshipsOTOverall ties [A 3] C%Conference winning percentage
Dagger-14-plain.pngElected to the College Football Hall of Fame O%Overall winning percentage [A 4]

Coaches

List of head football coaches showing season(s) coached, overall records, conference records, postseason records, championships and selected awards [A 5]
No.NameSeason(s)
[A 6]
GCOWOLOTO%CWCLCTC%PWPLPTDC
[A 7]
CCNCAwards
1 Hector Cowan 188821100.5000
No Coach1889, 1892–1893159600.6000
2 William P. Graves 18912020.0000
3 Vernon K. Irvine 189496300.66600
4 Thomas Trenchard 1895, 1913–19153726920.72910
5 Gordon Johnston 189683410.43700
6 William A. Reynolds 1897–19003827740.76300
7 Charles O. Jenkins 190197200.77700
8 Herman Olcott 1902–19031811430.69400
9 R. R. Brown 190495220.66600
10 William Warner 190584310.56200
11 Willis Kienholz 190671420.28500
12 Otis Lamson 190794410.50000
13 Edward L. Greene 190893330.50000
14 Arthur Brides 1909–1910168800.50000
15 Branch Bocock 191186110.81200
16 C. W. Martin 191283410.43700
17 Thomas J. Campbell 1916–1919179710.55800000
18 Myron Fuller 192082600.25000000
19 Bob Fetzer & Bill Fetzer 1921–192546301240.69513520.70000010
20 Chuck Collins 1926–193378383190.544242280.51800000
21 Carl Snavely Dagger-14-plain.png1934–1935, 1945–195299593550.621321120.73303030
22 Raymond Wolf 1936–194158381730.68123910.71200010
23 Jim Tatum Dagger-14-plain.png1942, 1956–195839191730.525131020.56000000
24 Tom Young 194396300.6662200.50000000
25 Gene McEver 194491710.1660310.12500000
26 George T. Barclay 1953–195530111810.3839800.52900000
27 Jim Hickey 1959–196681364500.444282500.52810010 ACC Coach of the Year (1963) [11] [A 8]
28 Bill Dooley 1967–1977124695320.560382220.62915030 ACC Coach of the Year (1971) [11]
29 Dick Crum 1978–1987116724130.633382310.62042010 ACC Coach of the Year (1980) [11]
30 Mack Brown Dagger-14-plain.png1988–1997, 2019–present141845610.595514210.54353000 ACC Coach of the Year (1996) [11]
31 Carl Torbush 1997–20003517180.4859150.3752000
32 John Bunting 2001–20067227450.37518300.37511000
33 Butch Davis
[A 9]
2007–20103512230.3427170.29112000
Int Everett Withers [A 10] 201113760.538350.37501000
34 Larry Fedora 2012–2018884543.5112828.50014200

Notes

  1. Although the first Rose Bowl Game was played in 1902, it has been continuously played since the 1916 game, and is recognized as the oldest bowl game by the NCAA. "—" indicates any season prior to 1916 when postseason games were not played. [7]
  2. A running total of the number of head coaches, with coaches who served separate tenures being counted only once. Interim head coaches are represented with "Int" and are not counted in the running total. "" indicates the team played but either without a coach or no coach is on record. "X" indicates an interim year without play.
  3. Overtime rules in college football were introduced in 1996, making ties impossible in the period since. [8]
  4. When computing the win–loss percentage, a tie counts as half a win and half a loss. [9]
  5. Statistics correct as of the end of the 2012 college football season.
  6. North Carolina did not field teams in 1890 after the faculty voted to discontinue the sport and in 1917 and 1918 due to World War I. [2]
  7. Divisional champions have advanced to the ACC Championship Game since the institution of divisional play beginning in the 2005 season. Since that time, North Carolina has competed as a member of the Coastal division. [10]
  8. The ACC Coach of the Year is voted by Atlantic Coast Sports Media Association (ACSMA). [12]
  9. Davis' record at the conclusion of the 2008 season was eight wins and five losses (8–5, 4–4 ACC) and eight wins and five losses (8–5, 4–4 ACC) in 2009. In September 2011, North Carolina vacated their 16 victories due to sanctions stemming from academic misconduct and accepting illegal benefits discovered during the 2010 season for the 2008 and 2009 seasons. As the penalty to vacate victories does not result in a loss (or forfeiture) of the affected contests or award a victory to the opponent, the official NCAA record for these years are 0–5 and 0–5 respectively. [13] [14]
  10. Everett Withers was named interim head coach for the 2011 season, following the termination of Butch Davis as head coach. [15]

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References

General

Specific

  1. 1 2 3 2011 North Carolina Football Media Guide, p. 174-179
  2. 1 2 UNC Athletic Communications Office. "History" (PDF). University Directories. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
  3. Kelly Parson (January 9, 2012). "Trustees approve Larry Fedora as UNC football coach". The Daily Tar Heel. DTH Publishing Corp. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
  4. 1 2 3 2011 North Carolina Football Media Guide, p. 173
  5. "Carl "The Grey Fox" Snavely". National Football Foundation . The National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame, INC. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
  6. "Jim "Big Jim" Tatum". National Football Foundation . The National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame, INC. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
  7. National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) (2011). Bowl/All-Star Game Records (PDF). Indianapolis, Indiana: NCAA. pp. 5–10. Archived from the original on August 22, 2011. Retrieved August 21, 2011.
  8. Whiteside, Kelly (August 25, 2006). "Overtime system still excites coaches". USA Today. McLean, Virginia. Archived from the original on November 24, 2009. Retrieved September 25, 2009.
  9. Finder, Chuck (September 6, 1987). "Big plays help Paterno to 200th". The New York Times. New York City. Archived from the original on October 22, 2009. Retrieved October 22, 2009.
  10. "ACC Unveils Future League Seal, Divisional Names". The ACC. CBS Interactive. October 18, 2004. Archived from the original on May 25, 2013. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
  11. 1 2 3 4 2011 North Carolina Football Media Guide, p. 116-117
  12. "2010 ACC Football Information Guide" (PDF). The ACC. Office of the Commissioner and the Communications Office of the Atlantic Coast Conference. Retrieved September 19, 2012.
  13. "North Carolina Response to Notice of NCAA Allegations" (PDF). September 19, 2011. Retrieved September 19, 2011.
  14. "UNC files response to NCAA notice of allegations". Sports Illustrated. Time Inc. September 19, 2011. Retrieved April 20, 2013.
  15. Heather Dinich (July 28, 2011). "UNC names Everett Withers interim coach". ESPN. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved April 20, 2013.