List of Roman public baths

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This is a list of ancient Roman public baths ( thermae ).

Contents

Urban baths

Remains of the Roman baths of Varna, Bulgaria VarnaRoman.JPG
Remains of the Roman baths of Varna, Bulgaria
Remains of Roman Thermae, Hisarya, Bulgaria Hisarya RomanThermae 1.jpg
Remains of Roman Thermae, Hisarya, Bulgaria
Bath ruins in Trier, Germany Trier Kaiserthermen BW 1.JPG
Bath ruins in Trier, Germany
Photo-textured 3D isometric view/plan of the Roman Baths in Weissenburg, Germany, using data from laser scan technology. Cyark Weissenburg plan.jpg
Photo-textured 3D isometric view/plan of the Roman Baths in Weißenburg, Germany, using data from laser scan technology.
Roman baths of Beit She'an, Israel Israel BeitShean4 tango7174.jpg
Roman baths of Beit She'an, Israel
The Baths of Caracalla, Rome Baths of Caracalla.JPG
The Baths of Caracalla, Rome
Remains of the Baths of Diocletian, Rome 3266 - Roma - Terme di Diocleziano - Foto Giovanni Dall'Orto 17-June-2007.jpg
Remains of the Baths of Diocletian, Rome
Ruins of the Roman Baths of Berytus, Beirut, Lebanon Roman baths beirut.jpg
Ruins of the Roman Baths of Berytus, Beirut, Lebanon
Roman bath ruins near Strumica Roman Bath Bansko RMacedonia.jpg
Roman bath ruins near Strumica
Pompeii, Italy. Hot room, Roman bath, Pompeii. Brooklyn Museum Archives, Goodyear Archival Collection Pompeii, Brooklyn Museum Archives.jpg
Pompeii, Italy. Hot room, Roman bath, Pompeii. Brooklyn Museum Archives, Goodyear Archival Collection
Ghajn Tuffieha Roman Baths, Malta Malta - Mgarr - Triq Ghajn Tuffieha - Roman Baths 06 ies.jpg
Għajn Tuffieħa Roman Baths, Malta
The Baths of Ancyra, Ankara, Turkey Ankara Thermen09.jpg
The Baths of Ancyra, Ankara, Turkey
Roman Baths (Bath), United Kingdom Roman Baths in Bath Spa, England - July 2006.jpg
Roman Baths (Bath), United Kingdom

Algeria

Austria

Bulgaria

Croatia

France

Germany

Hungary

Israel

Italy

Lebanon

Libya

North Macedonia

Malta

The Netherlands

Portugal

Romania

Spain

Tunisia

Turkey

United Kingdom

Military bathhouses

Roman Britain villas with bathhouse

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Baths of Trajan

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References

  1. "Termas Romanas". www.cm-evora.pt. Retrieved 2020-06-26.