List of Square Enix video game franchises

Last updated

Square Enix's current logo Square Enix logo.svg
Square Enix's current logo

Square Enix is a Japanese video game development and publishing company formed from the merger of video game publisher Enix absorbing developer Square on April 1, 2003. [1] The company is best known for its role-playing video game franchises, which include the Final Fantasy , Dragon Quest , and Kingdom Hearts series. Since its inception, the company has developed or published hundreds of titles in various video game franchises on numerous gaming systems. Of its properties, the Final Fantasy franchise is the best-selling, with a total worldwide sales of over 144 million units. [2] The Dragon Quest series has shipped over 78 million units worldwide [2] and is one of the most popular video game series in Japan, [3] while the Kingdom Hearts series has shipped over 30 million copies worldwide. [2]

Square Enix Japanese video game company

Square Enix Holdings Co., Ltd. is a Japanese video game developer, publisher, and distribution company known for its Final Fantasy, Dragon Quest, and Kingdom Hearts role-playing video game franchises, among numerous others. Several of them have sold over 10 million copies worldwide, with the Final Fantasy franchise alone selling 144 million, the Dragon Quest franchise selling 78 million and the Kingdom Hearts franchise selling 30 million. The Square Enix headquarters are in the Shinjuku Eastside Square Building in Shinjuku, Tokyo. The company employs over 4300 employees worldwide.

Video game electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor

A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a two- or three-dimensional video display device such as a TV screen, virtual reality headset or computer monitor. Since the 1980s, video games have become an increasingly important part of the entertainment industry, and whether they are also a form of art is a matter of dispute.

A video game developer is a software developer that specializes in video game development – the process and related disciplines of creating video games. A game developer can range from one person who undertakes all tasks to a large business with employee responsibilities split between individual disciplines, such as programming, design, art, testing, etc. Most game development companies have video game publisher financial and usually marketing support. Self-funded developers are known as independent or indie developers and usually make indie games.

Contents

Square Enix has owned Taito, which continues to publish its own video games, since September 2005, [4] and acquired game publisher Eidos Interactive in April 2009, which was merged with Square Enix's European publishing wing and renamed as Square Enix Europe. [5] This list includes franchises in which Square Enix, or its original components Enix and Square, or its subsidiaries, were the primary developer or publisher, even if the series was begun prior to the subsidiary's acquisition. Franchises are defined as any set of interconnected media consisting of more than one release, and video game franchises are defined as franchises which were initially created as a video game or series of video games.

Taito Japanese company

Taito Corporation is a Japanese company that specializes in video games, toys, arcade cabinets and game centers, based out of Shinjuku, Tokyo. The company was founded by Michael Kogan in 1953 as the Taito Trading Company, importing vodka, vending machines and jukeboxes into Japan. They would soon begin production of video games in 1972, renaming the company to simply Taito. In 2005, Taito was purchased by Square Enix, becoming a wholly owned subsidiary; however, they are treated as a separate entity from their parent company.

Square Enix Limited, doing business as Square Enix Europe, is a British video game publisher, acting as the European subsidiary of Square Enix. The company was founded as Domark in 1984, named after the founders Mark Strachan and Dominic Wheatley. In 1995, the company was acquired by Eidos and was merged with two other studios and renamed Eidos Interactive the following year. Eidos was in turn acquired by SCi in 2005, and Eidos Interactive was sold to Square Enix in 2009. On 9 November 2009, Square Enix completed the merger of its existing European branch with Eidos Interactive, renaming the resulting company Square Enix Europe.

For a list of all individual games developed or published by Square Enix, see the list of Square Enix video games and mobile games. For games released before the merger, see the Square and Enix video games. For games released by Taito, both before and after the acquisition, see the list of Taito games, and for games published by Eidos prior to acquisition see the List of Eidos Interactive games.

Video game franchises

Key
  Franchise primarily developed by Square, Enix, or Square Enix
Dagger-14-plain.png Franchise primarily developed by a subsidiary of Square, Enix, or Square Enix
 *  Franchise primarily published but not developed by Square, Enix, Square Enix, or their subsidiaries
FranchisePrimary genreFirst releasedLatest release
7th Saga * Action role-playing, puzzle 1993, The 7th Saga 1999, Mystic Ark: Theatre of Illusions
ActRaiser * Side-scroller, platformer, action role-playing 1990, ActRaiser [6] 1995, Terranigma [7]
All Star Pro-Wrestling Wrestling 2000, All Star Pro-Wrestling [8] 2003, All Star Pro-Wrestling III [9]
ArkanoidDagger-14-plain.png Breakout clone 1986, Arkanoid [10] 2017, Arkanoid vs. Space Invaders
Battle Gear Dagger-14-plain.png Racing 1996, Side by Side [11] 2006, Battle Gear 4 Tuned Professional Version [12]
Battlestations Dagger-14-plain.png Action, real-time tactics 2007, Battlestations: Midway [13] 2009, Battlestations: Pacific [13]
Birdie King Dagger-14-plain.png Sports 1982, Birdie King [14] 1984, Birdie King 3 [15]
Bubble Bobble Dagger-14-plain.png Platformer, puzzle 1983, Chack'n Pop 2017, Bust-A-Move Journey [16]
Bravely Role-playing 2012, Bravely Default [2] 2015, Bravely Second: End Layer [17]
Bushido Blade* Fighting 1997, Bushido Blade [8] 1998, Bushido Blade 2 [8]
Championship Manager * Sports, simulation 1992, Championship Manager [18] 2016, Championship Manager 17 [19]
Chaos HeatDagger-14-plain.png Survival horror, third-person shooter 1998, Chaos Heat2000, Chaos Break -Episode from "Chaos Heat"-
Chaos Rings * Role-playing 2010, Chaos Rings [2] 2014, Chaos Rings III [20]
ChaseDagger-14-plain.png Racing 1988, Chase H.Q. 2007, Chase H.Q. 2
Chocobo Role-playing, roguelike, racing 1997, Chocobo's Mystery Dungeon2012, Chocobo's Chocotto Farm
Chrono Role-playing 1995, Chrono Trigger [2] 1999, Chrono Cross [8]
Cleopatra FortuneDagger-14-plain.png Puzzle 1996, Cleopatra Fortune 2002, Cleopatra Fortune Plus
Conflict Dagger-14-plain.png Tactical shooter 2002, Conflict: Desert Storm [21] 2008, Conflict: Denied Ops [13]
DariusDagger-14-plain.png Action 1986, Darius [22] 2015, Dariusburst Chronicle Saviours
Death Trap Interactive fiction, visual novel 1984, The Death Trap 1986, Alpha
Densha de Go! Dagger-14-plain.png Train simulator 1996, Densha de Go! [23] 2018, Densha de Go! Plug & Play [24]
Deus Ex Dagger-14-plain.png Real-time tactics, first-person shooter 2000, Deus Ex [13] 2017, Deus Ex: Mankind Divided – VR Experience [25]
Dragon Quest * Role-playing 1986, Dragon Quest [2] 2017, Dragon Quest XI: Echoes of an Elusive Age
Drakengard * Action role-playing 2003, Drakengard [9] 2018, NieR:Automata BECOME AS GODS Edition
Dungeon Siege* Action role-playing 2002, Dungeon Siege 2011, Dungeon Siege III: Treasures of the Sun
E. V. O.* Role-playing, side-scroller 1990, E.V.O.: The Theory of Evolution1992, E.V.O.: Search for Eden
EclipseDagger-14-plain.png Space flight simulator 1994, Total Eclipse 1996, Titan Wars
Elevator ActionDagger-14-plain.png Platformer 1983, Elevator Action 2011, Elevator Action Deluxe
ExitDagger-14-plain.png Platformer, puzzle 2005, Exit 2009, Exit 2
Fear Effect* Action-adventure 2000, Fear Effect [13] 2018, Fear Effect Sedna [13]
Fighting ForceDagger-14-plain.png Fighting, beat 'em up 1997, Fighting Force [13] 1999, Fighting Force 2 [13]
Final Fantasy Role-playing 1987, Final Fantasy [2] 2018, World of Final Fantasy Maxima
Fortune Street Party game, board game 1991, Itadaki Street: Watashi no Omise ni Yottette [2] 2017, Itadaki Street: Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy 30th Anniversary [26]
Front Mission Tactical role-playing 1995, Front Mission [7] 2010, Front Mission Evolved [24]
Gangsters* Strategy 1998, Gangsters: Organized Crime 2001, Gangsters 2: Vendetta
Gex Dagger-14-plain.png Platformer 1994, Gex [27] 1999, Gex: Deep Pocket Gecko [13]
Groove Coaster * Rhythm game 2011, Groove Coaster2018, Groove Coaster 4: Starlight Road
Gunslinger Stratos Dagger-14-plain.png First-person shooter 2012, Gunslinger Stratos2017, Gunslinger Stratos Σ
Hanjuku Hero Real-time strategy 1988, Hanjuku Hero [6] 2005, Hanjuku Galaxy Lunch [28]
Hat Trick HeroDagger-14-plain.png Sports 1990, Football Champ 1995, Hat Trick Hero '95
Heimdall* Action role-playing 1991, Heimdall 1994, Heimdall 2: Into the Hall of Worlds
Just Cause * Sandbox, third-person shooter, action-adventure 2006, Just Cause [13] 2018, Just Cause 4 [17]
KiKi KaiKaiDagger-14-plain.png Shooter 1986, KiKi KaiKai 2001, Pocky & Rocky with Becky
Kingdom Hearts © [Note 1] Action role-playing 2002, Kingdom Hearts [2] 2019, Kingdom Hearts III [29]
Legacy of Kain Dagger-14-plain.png Action-adventure 1996, Blood Omen: Legacy of Kain [27] 2003, Legacy of Kain: Defiance [13]
Life Is Strange * Episodic graphic adventure 2015, Life Is Strange 2018, Life Is Strange 2
Lufia * Role-playing 1993, Lufia & the Fortress of Doom [30] 2010, Lufia: Curse of the Sinistrals [24]
Mana Role-playing 1991, Final Fantasy Adventure [2] 2016, Adventures of Mana [31]
Mini Ninjas* Action-adventure 2009, Mini Ninjas 2013, Mini Ninjas Mobile
Musashi Role-playing 1990, Adventures of Musashi 2005, Musashi: Samurai Legend [28]
Ogre Dagger-14-plain.png Tactical role-playing, real-time strategy 1993, Ogre Battle: The March of the Black Queen [32] 2010, Tactics Ogre: Wheel of Fate [33]
Operation WolfDagger-14-plain.png Shooting gallery 1987, Operation Wolf 1998, Operation Tiger
PandemoniumDagger-14-plain.png Platformer 1996, Pandemonium! 1997, Pandemonium 2
Parasite Eve Role-playing, third-person shooter 1998, Parasite Eve [8] 2010, The 3rd Birthday [24]
Power Blade* Action, platformer 1991, Power Blade 1992, Power Blade 2
Psychic ForceDagger-14-plain.png Fighting 1995, Psychic Force 2005, Psychic Force Complete
QixDagger-14-plain.png Puzzle 1981, Qix 2009, Qix++
Rakugaki ŌkokuDagger-14-plain.png Role-playing 2002, Magic Pengel: The Quest for Color 2004, Graffiti Kingdom
RayDagger-14-plain.png Scrolling shooter 1994, RayForce 1998, RayCrisis: Series Termination
SaGa Role-playing 1989, The Final Fantasy Legend [2] 2016, SaGa: Scarlet Grace [31]
Shellshock* Shooter 1995, Shellshock: Jus' Keepin' da Peace 2009, Shellshock 2: Blood Trails [13]
Sonic Blast ManDagger-14-plain.png Beat 'em up 1990, Sonic Blast Man 2011, Sonic Blast Heroes [34]
Space Invaders Dagger-14-plain.png Fixed shooter 1978, Space Invaders [2] 2018, Space Invaders Extreme
Speed Race Dagger-14-plain.png Racing 1974, Speed Race [35] 1998, Automobili Lamborghini: Super Speed Race 64 [36]
Star Ocean * Role-playing 1996, Star Ocean [8] 2016, Star Ocean: Anamnesis [31]
Supreme Commander* Real-time strategy 2007, Supreme Commander 2010, Supreme Commander 2
Thief Dagger-14-plain.png Stealth, action-adventure 1998, Thief: The Dark Project [13] 2014, Thief [20]
ThunderhawkDagger-14-plain.png Combat flight simulator 1992, Thunderhawk 2001, Thunderhawk: Operation Phoenix
Tobal* Fighting 1996, Tobal No. 1 [8] 1997, Tobal 2 [8]
Tomb Raider Dagger-14-plain.png Action-adventure 1996, Tomb Raider [2] 2018, Shadow of the Tomb Raider
Urban Chaos* Action-adventure, first-person shooter 1998, Urban Chaos [13] 2006, Urban Chaos: Riot Response [13]
Valkyrie Profile * Role-playing 1999, Valkyrie Profile [8] 2016, Valkyrie Anatomia: The Origin [31]
Wonder Project * Life simulation 1994, Wonder Project J 1996, Wonder Project J2

Notes

  1. © Disney

See also

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