List of Chocobo media

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The Chocobo series is a collection of video games published by Square, and later by Square Enix, featuring a recurring creature from the Final Fantasy series, the Chocobo, as the protagonist. The creature is a large and normally flightless bird which first appeared in Final Fantasy II and has been featured in almost all subsequent Final Fantasy games, as well as making cameo appearances in numerous other games. The Chocobo series of video games contains over 20 titles for video game consoles, mobile phones, and online platforms. These games include installments of the Mystery Dungeon series of roguelike video games, racing games, adventure games, and minigame collections. Although the various games of the series have different game styles and are generally unrelated except by their inclusion of a Chocobo as the main character, Square Enix considers them to be a distinct series. [1]

Square Co., Ltd. was a Japanese video game company founded in September 1986 by Masafumi Miyamoto. It merged with Enix in 2003 to form Square Enix. The company also used SquareSoft as a brand name to refer to their games, and the term is occasionally used to refer to the company itself. In addition, "Square Soft, Inc" was the name of the company's American arm before the merger, after which it was renamed to "Square Enix, Inc".

Square Enix Japanese video game company

Square Enix Holdings Co., Ltd. is a Japanese video game developer, publisher, and distribution company known for its Final Fantasy, Dragon Quest, and Kingdom Hearts role-playing video game franchises, among numerous others. Several of them have sold over 10 million copies worldwide, with the Final Fantasy franchise alone selling 144 million, the Dragon Quest franchise selling 78 million and the Kingdom Hearts franchise selling 30 million. The Square Enix headquarters are in the Shinjuku Eastside Square Building in Shinjuku, Tokyo. The company employs over 4300 employees worldwide.

Final Fantasy is a Japanese science fantasy media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix. The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs/JRPGs). The first game in the series was released in 1987, with 14 other main-numbered entries being released since then. The franchise has since branched into other video game genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm, as well as branching into other media, including CGI films, anime, manga, and novels.

Contents

The first game in the series, Chocobo no Fushigina Dungeon, is a Mystery Dungeon game released in 1997, while the latest is Chocobo no Chocotto Nouen, a 2012 farming game for the GREE mobile platform. Another game in the series, Chocobo Racing 3D, was cancelled in 2013. [2] A new game, Chocobo's Mystery Dungeon Every Buddy, is planned for release in early 2019. In addition to Square and Square Enix, the games have been developed by several other companies, including h.a.n.d., Bottle Cube, and Smile-Lab. Eight albums of music from Chocobo games have been produced and published by Square Enix, DigiCube, and Toshiba EMI, and an additional album of Chocobo-related music from both the Chocobo and Final Fantasy series, Compi de Chocobo, was released in 2013.

GREE is a Japanese social networking service founded by Yoshikazu Tanaka and operated by GREE, Inc..

h.a.n.d. Japanese video game developer

h.a.n.d. Inc., abbreviation of Hokkaido Artists' Network and Development, is a Japanese video game developer. The company originally started as a service selling Macintosh hardware and software to universities before the Mac platform was widely known. When competition in the field increased, h.a.n.d. reorganized to develop original software.

DigiCube Co., Ltd. was a Japanese company established as a subsidiary of software developer Square on February 6, 1996 and headquartered in Tokyo, Japan. The primary purpose of DigiCube was to market and distribute Square products, most notably video games and related merchandise, including toys, books, and music soundtracks. DigiCube served as a wholesaler to distributors, and was noteworthy for pioneering the sale of video games in Japanese convenience stores and vending machine kiosks.

Games

TitleOriginal release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Chocobo no Fushigi na Dungeon December 23, 1997 [3] nonenone
Notes:
Chocobo's Dungeon 2 December 23, 1998 [7] December 15, 1999 [8] none
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation
  • Developed and published by Square [7]
  • Originally released in Japan under the title Chocobo's Mystery Dungeon 2(チョコボの不思議なダンジョン2, Chocobo no Fushigi na Dungeon 2)
  • Part of the Mystery Dungeon series of roguelike video games
  • A WonderSwan Color version was planned but not released [4]
  • Also available on PlayStation Network (2010) [9]
Chocobo World February 11, 1999 [10] January 25, 2000 (Windows) [11] February 18, 2000 (Windows) [12]
Notes:
  • Released on PocketStation
  • Developed and published by Square [10]
  • A minigame released as part of Final Fantasy VIII
  • Originally released in Japan under the title Let's Go Out Chocobo RPG(おでかけチョコボRPG, Odekake Chokobo RPG)
  • Included in the Windows version of Final Fantasy VIII (2000) [11]
Chocobo Racing March 18, 1999 [13] August 10, 1999 [14] October 11, 1999 [15]
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation
  • Developed and published by Square [14]
  • A racing video game
  • Originally released in Japan under the title Chocobo Racing: Road to the Spirit World(チョコボレーシング 〜幻界へのロード〜, Chokobo Rēshingu ~ Genkai e no Rōdo ~)
  • Also included in the Chocobo Collection compilation release (1999, Japan) [16]
  • Also available on PlayStation Network (2009) [17]
Chocobo Stallion December 22, 1999 [18] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation
  • Developed by ParityBit [18] and published by Square in the Chocobo Collection compilation release [16]
  • A Chocobo raising and racing simulation
  • Also available on PlayStation Network (2008) [19]
Dice de Chocobo December 22, 1999 [16] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation
  • Developed by Denyusha [20] and published by Square in the Chocobo Collection compilation release [16]
  • A board game
  • Released on Game Boy Advance in 2002, as Chocobo Land: A Game of Dice [21]
  • PlayStation version available on PlayStation Network (2008) [22]
  • Game Boy Advance version released on Nintendo Wii U Virtual Console on February 10, 2016.
Hataraku Chocobo September 21, 2000 [23] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on WonderSwan Color
  • Developed and published by Square [23]
  • Title translates as Working Chocobo
  • A life simulation game
Dokodemo Chocobo May 24, 2002 [24] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on mobile phones
  • Developed and published by Square [24]
  • Title translates as Chocobo Anywhere
  • A two-part app; the first part is an adventure game, while in the second part items obtained in the first part can be used to decorate the standby screen of the phone.
Dokodemo Chocobo 2: Dasshutsu! Yūreisen May 23, 2003 [25] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on mobile phones
  • Developed and published by Square Enix [25]
  • Title translates as Chocobo Anywhere 2: Escape! Ghost Ship
  • An adventure game available for a different model of phone than Dokodemo Chocobo
  • A second part to the game with similar gameplay was released as a stand-alone download in 2004, titled Chocobo Anywhere 2.5: Infiltration! Ancient Ruin(どこでもチョコボ2・5 潜入! 古代遺跡, Dokodemo Chokobo 2.5: Sennyū! Kodai Iseki)
Choco-Mate May 23, 2003 [26] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on mobile phones
  • Developed and published by Square Enix [26]
  • Social networking service for mobile phones
Dokodemo Chocobo 3: Taose! Niji Iro Daimaō May 19, 2004 [27] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on mobile phones
  • Developed and published by Square Enix [27]
  • Title translates as Chocobo Anywhere 3: Defeat! The Great Rainbow-Colored Demon
  • An adventure game like Dokodemo Chocobo 2 for a third model of phone
Chocobo de Mobile December 14, 2006 [28] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on mobile phones
  • Developed and published by Square Enix [28]
  • Mobile application featuring sports and other mini-games
Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo Tales December 14, 2006 [29] April 3, 2007 [29] May 25, 2007 [29]
Notes:
  • Released on Nintendo DS
  • Developed by h.a.n.d. and published by Square Enix [30]
  • Originally released in Japan under the title Chocobo and the Magic Picture Book(チョコボと魔法の絵本, Chocobo to Mahō no Ehon)
  • An adventure and puzzle game
Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo's Dungeon December 13, 2007 [31] July 8, 2008 [31] November 7, 2008 [31]
Notes:
  • Released on Wii
  • Developed by h.a.n.d. and published by Square Enix [32]
  • Originally released in Japan under the title Chocobo's Mystery Dungeon: The Labyrinth of Forgotten Time(チョコボの不思議なダンジョン 時忘れの迷宮, Chocobo no Fushigina Dungeon: Toki Wasure no Meikyū)
  • Part of the Mystery Dungeon series of roguelike video games
Cid to Chocobo no Fushigi na Dungeon Toki Wasure no Meikyū DS+ October 30, 2008 [33] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on Nintendo DS
  • Developed by h.a.n.d. and published by Square Enix [30]
  • Title translates as Cid and Chocobo's Mystery Dungeon: The Labyrinth of Forgotten Time DS+
  • Enhanced port of Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo's Dungeon
  • Part of the Mystery Dungeon series of roguelike video games
Chocobo to Mahō no Ehon: Majo to Shōjo to Gonin no Yūsha December 11, 2008 [34] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on Nintendo DS
  • Developed by h.a.n.d. and published by Square Enix [30]
  • Title translates as Chocobo and the Magic Picture Book: The Witch, the Girl, and the Five Heroes
  • Adventure and puzzle game sequel to Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo Tales
Chocobo Panic May 28, 2010 [35] May 28, 2010 [35] May 28, 2010 [35]
Notes:
  • Released on iPad
  • Developed by Bottle Cube and published by Square Enix [35]
  • A party game
  • Removed from Apple App Store in 2017
Chocobo's Crystal Tower June 29, 2010 [36] November 2, 2010 (Facebook) [36] November 2, 2010 (Facebook) [36]
Notes:
  • Released on mobile phones
  • Developed by h.a.n.d. and published by Square Enix [36]
  • Originally released in Japan under the title Chocobo to Crystal no Tō(チョコボとクリスタルの塔,Chokobo to Kurisutaru no Tō, lit. "Chocobo and the Crystal Tower") [36]
  • Additionally released as a Facebook app
  • A life simulation game
  • Later shut down
Chocobo no Chocotto Nouen December 19, 2012 [37] nonenone
Notes:
  • Released on the GREE mobile platform
  • Developed by Smile-Lab and published by Square Enix [37]
  • Title translates as Chocobo's Chocotto Farm
  • A farming game
Chocobo Racing 3D cancelled [2] nonenone
Notes:
  • Announced for Nintendo 3DS
  • In development by h.a.n.d. and to be published by Square Enix
  • Cancellation confirmed in 2013 [2]
  • A racing game
Chocobo's Mystery Dungeon Every Buddy!March 20, 2019 [38] March 20, 2019 [38] March 20, 2019 [38]
Notes:

Music

TitleRelease dateLengthLabelRef.
Chocobo no Fushigina Dungeon Original SoundtrackDecember 21, 19971:11:37 DigiCube [39]
Chocobo no Fushigina Dungeon Coi Vanni GialliFebruary 5, 199840:52 DigiCube [40]
Chocobo no Fushigina Dungeon 2 Original SoundtrackJanuary 21, 19991:05:40 DigiCube [41]
Chocobo Racing Original SoundtrackMarch 25, 199957:00 Square Enix [42]
The Best of Chocobo and the Magic Book Original SoundtrackMarch 25, 199926:16 Square Enix [43]
Chocobo and the Magic Books Original SoundtrackMarch 25, 19991:51:57 Square Enix [44]
Chocobo no Fushigina Dungeon Toki Wasure No Meikyuu: Door CrawlDecember 12, 200714:18 Toshiba EMI [45]
Chocobo no Fushigina Dungeon Toki Wasure No Meikyū Original SoundtrackJanuary 23, 20081:16:01 Square Enix [46]
Compi de ChocoboSeptember 21, 20132:13:01 Square Enix [47]

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