Music of Final Fantasy XI

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The music of the MMORPG Final Fantasy XI was composed by Naoshi Mizuta along with regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu and Kumi Tanioka. The Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack, a compilation of almost all of the music in the game, was released by DigiCube in 2002, and subsequently re-released by Square Enix in 2004. Final Fantasy XI Rise of the Zilart Original Soundtrack was released by DigiCube in 2003 after the release of the Rise of the Zilart expansion for Final Fantasy XI, and re-released by Square Enix in 2004. Final Fantasy XI Chains of Promathia Original Soundtrack was produced by Square Enix in 2004 after the release of the Chains of Promathia expansion, and in 2005 Square Enix published Music from the Other Side of Vana'diel, a collection of arranged tracks from the game performed by The Star Onions, a group composed of Square Enix composers including Naoshi Mizuta, Kumi Tanioka and Hidenori Iwasaki. Final Fantasy XI Treasures of Aht Urhgan Original Soundtrack was released by Square Enix in 2006 for the Treasures of Aht Urhgan expansion.

Massively multiplayer online role-playing games (MMORPGs) are a combination of role-playing video games and massively multiplayer online games in which a very large number of players interact with one another within a virtual world.

<i>Final Fantasy XI</i> 2002 video game

Final Fantasy XI, also known as Final Fantasy XI Online, is a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG), developed and published by Square as part of the Final Fantasy series. Designed and produced by Hiromichi Tanaka, it was released in Japan on May 16, 2002, for PlayStation 2 and Microsoft Windows-based personal computers in November of that year. The game was the first MMORPG to offer cross-platform play between PlayStation 2 and personal computer. It was also the Xbox 360's first MMORPG. All versions of the game require a monthly subscription to play.

Naoshi Mizuta is a Japanese video game composer and musician. He is best known for his work on Final Fantasy XI, but has also composed music for Mega Man & Bass, Street Fighter Alpha, and Parasite Eve II. He started his career at Capcom before moving to Square in 1998.

Contents

In 2007, Square Enix released the Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack Premium Box, a collection of all of the previously released albums, as well as the as yet unreleased Final Fantasy XI Unreleased Tracks and Piano Collections Final Fantasy XI, an album of unreleased music from the game and its expansions and an album of piano arrangements of music from the game, respectively. After the release of the fourth expansion for the game, Final Fantasy XI Wings of the Goddess Original Soundtrack was released in 2008 by Square Enix. Additionally, in summer 2008 another Piano Collections Final Fantasy XI album, completely separate from the previous piano collections album, will be released by Square Enix.

Piano musical instrument

The piano is an acoustic, stringed musical instrument invented in Italy by Bartolomeo Cristofori around the year 1700, in which the strings are struck by hammers. It is played using a keyboard, which is a row of keys that the performer presses down or strikes with the fingers and thumbs of both hands to cause the hammers to strike the strings.

The music has received mixed reviews; while reviewers have praised some of the associated albums such as Final Fantasy XI Rise of the Zilart Original Soundtrack and Final Fantasy XI Treasures of Aht Urhgan Original Soundtrack, other albums, such as Final Fantasy XI Chains of Promathia Original Soundtrack and Music from the Other Side of Vana'diel, were not as universally liked. Several songs, especially "Distant Worlds", remain popular today, and have been performed numerous times in orchestral concert series, as well as been published in arranged and compilation albums by Square as well as outside groups.

Creation and influence

The music of Final Fantasy XI was scored by Nobuo Uematsu, Naoshi Mizuta, and Kumi Tanioka. [1] Composer Yasunori Mitsuda was also asked to contribute, but he was busy scoring Xenosaga . [2] The expansion packs were scored by Mizuta alone after Tanioka left to pursue other projects and Uematsu left Square Enix, although their names remain in the credits for those albums due to the inclusion of versions of songs they had previously composed for the game. The opening of the game features choral music with lyrics in Esperanto. [2] According to Uematsu, the choice of language was meant to symbolize the developers' hope that their online game could contribute to cross-cultural communication and cooperation. He also noted the increased difficulty of scoring a game for which there was no linear plotline, a major change from the previous Final Fantasy games. It was the first game in the series for which he composed while he was no longer a Square employee. [3] New music has been employed for special events, such as a holiday score titled Jeuno -Starlight Celebration- which can be heard in the city of Jeuno each mid to late December since 2004. Some of the game's music has been released on iTunes for download, such as the vocal "Distant Worlds", which was released on the Japanese iTunes Music Store on September 13, 2005, having been put in the game in a July 2005 patch. [4]

Yasunori Mitsuda Video game composer

Yasunori Mitsuda is a Japanese composer, musician, and sound producer. He is best known for his work in video games, primarily for the Chrono, Xeno, Shadow Hearts, and Inazuma Eleven franchises, among various others. Mitsuda began composing music for his own games in high school, later attending the Junior College of Music in Tokyo. As part of his college course, he was granted an intern position at the game development studio Wolf Team, studying under composer Motoi Sakuraba. Upon graduation in 1992, he joined Square after seeing a magazine advertisement in an office he was visiting with his professor.

Xenosaga is a role-playing video game series developed by Monolith Soft and primarily published by Namco. Forming part of the wider Xeno metaseries, Xenosaga is set in a science fiction universe and follows a group of characters as they face both a hostile alien race called the Gnosis and human factions fighting for control of the Zohar, an artifact connected to a god-like energy called U-DO. Gameplay across the series is similar, with the characters being guided through a linear narrative and fighting enemies using a turn-based combat system. The party fights both on foot and in a variety of mechs.

Esperanto constructed language

Esperanto is the most widely spoken constructed international auxiliary language. It was created in the late 19th century by L. L. Zamenhof, a Polish-Jewish ophthalmologist. In 1887, he published a book detailing the language, Unua Libro, under the pseudonym Dr. Esperanto. Esperanto translates to English as "one who hopes".

Albums

Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack

Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack
Ffxiost SQEX-10017~8 front.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedJune 5, 2002
May 10, 2004 (re-release)
Genre
LengthDisk 1: 56:01
Disk 2: 55:56
Label DigiCube
Square Enix (re-release)
Producer Nobuo Uematsu

Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack is the soundtrack album of Final Fantasy XI. The album contains musical tracks from the game, composed by Nobuo Uematsu, Naoshi Mizuta, and Kumi Tanioka. The soundtrack was released on June 5, 2002 by DigiCube with the catalog numbers SSCX-10069-70, and re-released on May 10, 2004 by Square Enix with the catalog numbers SQEX-10017-8. The album spans 51 tracks over two disks and covers a duration of 1:51:57. [5]

A soundtrack, also written sound track, can be recorded music accompanying and synchronized to the images of a motion picture, book, television program, or video game; a commercially released soundtrack album of music as featured in the soundtrack of a film, video, or television presentation; or the physical area of a film that contains the synchronized recorded sound.

Album collection of recorded music, words, sounds

An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a collection on compact disc (CD), vinyl, audio tape, or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century as individual 78-rpm records collected in a bound book resembling a photograph album; this format evolved after 1948 into single vinyl LP records played at ​33 13 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though album sales in the 21st-century have mostly focused on CD and MP3 formats. The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s.

Nobuo Uematsu Japanese video game composer

Nobuo Uematsu is a Japanese video game composer, best known for scoring most of the titles in the Final Fantasy series by Square Enix. He is considered to be one of the most well known composers in the video game industry. Sometimes referred to as the "Beethoven of video games music", he has appeared five times in the top 20 of the annual Classic FM Hall of Fame.

Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack reached #25 on the Japan Oricon charts, selling over 13,200 copies [6] [7] It received mixed reviews by critics, with Ben Schweitzer of RPGFan finding it to be a "strong" album, if "slower" and "more repetitive than previous Final Fantasy scores". [5] Liz Maas of RPGFan enjoyed the album, advising any fan of the series, even if not of the game itself, to buy the album. [5] Joe Schwebke of Soundtrack Central, on the other hand, found it to be "a collection of bland melodies, dull chord progressions, and aged tapestries of musical technique" and, while praising the sound quality, termed it overall a "disappointment". [8] Chris of Square Enix Music Online, however, felt that while it was "not instantly likable" that it had "the potential to become a favorite with multiple listens". [9]

Oricon Inc., established in 1999, is the holding company at the head of a Japanese corporate group that supplies statistics and information on music and the music industry in Japan. It started as Original Confidence Inc., which was founded by Sōkō Koike in November 1967 and became known for its music charts. Oricon Inc. was originally set up as a subsidiary of Original Confidence and took over the latter’s Oricon record charts in April 2002.

Final Fantasy XI Rise of the Zilart Original Soundtrack

Final Fantasy XI Rise of the Zilart Original Soundtrack is a soundtrack album of the Final Fantasy XI Rise of the Zilart expansion. The album contains musical tracks from the game, composed by Naoshi Mizuta and Nobuo Uematsu and arranged by Naoshi Mizuta. The soundtrack was released on May 21, 2003 by DigiCube with the catalog number SSCX-10093, and re-released on September 23, 2004 by Square Enix with the catalog number SQEX-10034. The album spans 19 tracks and covers a duration of 70:12. [1]

Final Fantasy XI Rise of the Zilart Original Soundtrack reached #53 on the Oricon charts and sold nearly 6,700 copies. [10] [11] It was well received by critics such as Patrick Gann of RPGFan, who called it "a solid OST" of "well-developed compositions". [1] Chris of Square Enix Music Online agreed, terming it "a very well-produced soundtrack" and "a consistent and fitting effort". [12]

Final Fantasy XI Chains of Promathia Original Soundtrack

Kumi Tanioka composed and arranged music from Final Fantasy XI and some of its expansions, and is also a member of The Star Onions. Kumi Tanioka 1.jpg
Kumi Tanioka composed and arranged music from Final Fantasy XI and some of its expansions, and is also a member of The Star Onions.

Final Fantasy XI Chains of Promathia Original Soundtrack is a soundtrack album of the Final Fantasy XI Chains of Promathia expansion. The album contains musical tracks from the game, composed by Naoshi Mizuta, Kumi Tanioka, and Nobuo Uematsu and arranged by Naoshi Mizuta and Kumi Tanioka. The soundtrack was released on November 17, 2004 by Square Enix with the catalog number SQEX-10041. It covers a duration of 78:20 over 24 tracks. [13]

Unlike the first expansion soundtrack, Promathia was not received well by critics, though it reached #57 on the Oricon charts and sold 6,000 copies. [10] [14] Patrick Gann expressed himself as "disappointed" and said that the album was full of "boring, repetitive string-work" instead of Mizuta's usual "strong, raw instrumentation". [13] Chris of Square Enix Music Online termed it "the least accessible Final Fantasy XI soundtrack" and disliked its "grating synth use", but also termed it "an excellent in-game accompaniment". [15]

Music from the Other Side of Vana'diel

Music from the Other Side of Vana'diel is an arranged album of tracks from Final Fantasy XI and its expansions, performed by The Star Onions, a group composed of Square Enix composers, including Naoshi Mizuta, Kumi Tanioka and Hidenori Iwasaki. The album was released by Square Enix on August 24, 2005 under the catalog number SQEX-10050. The album consists of newly arranged versions of songs from Final Fantasy XI and its first two expansions. The album contains 10 tracks and covers a duration of 53:21. The majority of the tracks are smooth jazz, with the exception of Awakening and Blessed in Her Glorious Light - The Grand Duchy of Jeuno, which encompass electronica and gospel respectively. [16]

The album received widely varied reviews by critics and reached #55 on the Oricon charts, selling nearly 8,000 copies. [10] [17] Mike Wilson of RPGFan termed it a "high caliber soundtrack" and said that it was full of "extremely well done" tracks. [16] Ryan Mattich of RPGFan was slightly less impressed, saying that while "each track is a masterpiece", that the album as a whole lacked cohesion. [16] Chris of Square Enix Music Online was much harsher towards the album, finding it to be "fundamentally flawed" due to a lack of coherence and disliked several of the tracks, especially the ones arranged by Mizuta. [18]

Final Fantasy XI Treasures of Aht Urhgan Original Soundtrack

Final Fantasy XI Treasures of Aht Urhgan Original Soundtrack is a soundtrack album of the Final Fantasy XI Treasures of Aht Urhgan expansion. The album contains musical tracks from the game, composed by Naoshi Mizuta and Nobuo Uematsu and arranged by Naoshi Mizuta. The soundtrack was released on May 24, 2006 by Square Enix with the catalog number SQEX-10072. It covers a duration of 64:48 over 21 tracks. [19]

Final Fantasy XI Treasures of Aht Urhgan Original Soundtrack was well received by critics, with Patrick Gann describing it as "wonderful", and saying that "nearly every song has its own memorable feel". [19] Chris of Square Enix Music Online agreed, terming it "a solid mixture of continuity and change". [20] It reached position #50 on the Oricon charts. [21]

Final Fantasy XI Unreleased Tracks

Final Fantasy XI Unreleased Tracks is a collection of Final Fantasy XI music composed by Naoshi Mizuta that had not been released as part of any of the official albums for Final Fantasy XI or its expansions. It spans 18 tracks and covers a duration of 50:43. It has not been released as a single album, but rather can only be found as part of the Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack Premium Box, which was released on March 28, 2007, by Square Enix with the catalog number SQEX-10093. [22] Final Fantasy XI Unreleased Tracks was well received by critics such as Patrick Gann, who said that it was an album full of "interesting pieces". [22]

Piano Collections Final Fantasy XI

Piano Collections Final Fantasy XI is a collection of Final Fantasy XI music composed by Nobuo Uematsu, Naoshi Mizuta, and Kumi Tanioka and arranged for the piano by Kaoru Ishikawa. It spans 10 tracks and covers a duration of 38:42. It has not been released as a single album, but rather can only be found as part of the Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack Premium Box, which was released on March 28, 2007, by Square Enix with the catalog number SQEX-10094. [22] The album received varied reviews by critics. Patrick Gann termed it "excellent" and praised the technical skills of the performers, though he disliked the short length of the album. [22] Jillian of Square Enix Music Online, on the other hand, was "disappointed" with the album, finding the arrangements to be "simplistic" and the performances, while good technically, to be lacking in passion. [23] The box set reached #35 on the Oricon charts. [24]

Final Fantasy XI Wings of the Goddess Original Soundtrack

Final Fantasy XI Wings of the Goddess Original Soundtrack is a soundtrack album of the Final Fantasy XI Wings of the Goddess expansion. The album contains musical tracks from the game, composed by Naoshi Mizuta, as well as three bonus tracks containing songs from the Treasures of Aht Urhgan expansion that were not included in the soundtrack. The soundtrack was released on the April 23, 2008 by Square Enix with the catalog number SQEX-10113 and spans a duration of 77:44 over 25 tracks. [25]

Final Fantasy XI Wings of the Goddess Original Soundtrack received mixed reviews from reviewers, with Patrick Gann saying that "It is consistently good, but rarely is it mind-blowing". He did, however, praise Mizuta, saying that "Mizuta has grown...to the point where I imagine he can take on nearly any project". [25] It reached position #47 on the Oricon charts. [26]

Piano Collections Final Fantasy XI (2008)

Piano Collections Final Fantasy XI is a collection of Final Fantasy XI music composed by Nobuo Uematsu and Naoshi Mizuta, arranged for the piano by Kaoru Ishikawa, and performed by Ayumi Iga and Kasumi Ōga. It spans 11 tracks and covers a duration of 41:30. Although it has the same name as the album from the Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack Premium Box, it is an entirely separate album. It was released on June 25, 2008 by Square Enix with the catalog number SQEX-10117. [27]

The album was well received by critics, with Patrick Gann praising its "high-quality arrangements, and extremely high-quality recording and production value". [27] It made it to position #25 on the Oricon charts and remained on the charts for four weeks. [28]

Sanctuary

Sanctuary is the second arranged album of tracks from Final Fantasy XI and its expansions by The Star Onions. The album was released by Square Enix on May 20, 2009 under the catalog number SQEX-10143. The album consists of newly arranged versions of songs from Final Fantasy XI and its first four expansions. The album contains 11 tracks and covers a duration of 52:40. The majority of the tracks are new age, combining the smooth jazz of their previous album with strings, funk, and classical. [29] Sanctuary reached #60 on the Oricon charts. [30] It was well received by Patrick Gann, who termed the arrangements as strong and balanced, and called the total album a "lovely little surprise". [29]

Memories of Dusk and Dawn

Final Fantasy XI 8th Anniversary: Memories of Dusk and Dawn is a compilation album of tracks from the game and its expansions. It was released on May 12, 2010 by Square Enix with the catalog number SQEX-10191. [31] The tracks were selected through a vote by fans, which ended on March 8, 2010. [32] The album has 27 tracks and has a length of 1:18:32. The majority of the tracks have appeared on previous albums, with only some music from the PlayOnline service as newly released. [31] Memories of Dusk and Dawn was noted by Gann as a good "best of" album, but of no use to fans of the music who have other albums from the series; it reached #27 on the Oricon charts when released. [31] [33]

Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack PLUS

Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack PLUS is a two-disc soundtrack album containing mostly previously unreleased music. The music on the first disc was composed by Naoshi Mizuta and comes from the Wings of the Goddess expansion, the three add-on scenarios and the Abyssea trilogy. The second disc contains the background tracks of the PlayOnline Viewer composed by Noriko Matsueda and Kumi Tanioka of which only two had been previously released as part of the Memories of Dusk and Dawn compilation. The soundtrack was released on November 9, 2011 by Square Enix with the catalog numbers SQEX-10284-5 and spans a duration of 2:15:40 over 40 tracks.

Track list

Final Fantasy XI Seekers of Adoulin Original Soundtrack

Final Fantasy XI Seekers of Adoulin Original Soundtrack is a soundtrack album of the Final Fantasy XI Seekers of Adoulin expansion. The album contains musical tracks from the game, composed by Naoshi Mizuta. The soundtrack was released on March 27, 2013 by Square Enix with the catalog number SQEX-10362 and spans a duration of 50:08 over 13 tracks. [34] An additional EP, Forever Today: Final Fantasy XI Seekers of Adoulin OST PLUS, was released for the Seekers of Adoulin expansion by Square Enix on November 11, 2014. The EP was released digitally only and has a catalog number of SQEX-50055. It also contains music composed by Mizuta, and spans a duration of 31:34 over 8 tracks. [35]

Final Fantasy XI Seekers of Adoulin Original Soundtrack received tepid reviews from reviewers, with Derek Heemsbergen of RPGFan calling it "a fine demonstration of how Mizuta has evolved as a musician", though he described several of the tracks as "safe" and "not the best". [34] It reached position #125 on the Oricon charts for one week. [36] Forever Today: Final Fantasy XI Seekers of Adoulin OST PLUS received better reviews, with Patrick Gann of RPGFan terming it a "digital-only nugget of goodness" containing a few solid tracks by Mizuta. [35]

Track list

Final Fantasy XI Priceless Remembrance

Final Fantasy XI Priceless Remembrance is a Blu-Ray soundtrack album containing music from the Rhapsodies of Vana'diel add-on. In addition to musical tracks from the add-on, the album also contains several musical tracks from the original soundtracks and video footage of scenery from the game, as well as MP3 encoded files of the audio tracks.

Track List

Legacy

The Black Mages, a band led by Nobuo Uematsu that arranges music from Final Fantasy video games into a rock music style, have arranged "Distant Worlds" in the album Darkness and Starlight , published in 2008. [37] Uematsu continues to perform certain pieces in his Dear Friends: Music from Final Fantasy concert series. [38] The music of Final Fantasy XI has also appeared in various official concerts and live albums, such as the Distant Worlds - Music from Final Fantasy concert tour, where "Opening Theme" and "Distant Worlds" were performed as a medley by the Royal Stockholm Philharmonic Orchestra, [39] while "Ronfaure" was performed by the New Japan Philharmonic Orchestra in the Tour de Japon: Music from Final Fantasy concert series. [40] Selections of music from Final Fantasy XI also appear on Japanese remix albums, called dōjin music, and on English remixing websites. [41]

Related Research Articles

Final Fantasy is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi and owned by Square Enix that includes video games, motion pictures, and other merchandise. The series began in 1987 as an eponymous role-playing video game developed by Square, spawning a video game series that became the central focus of the franchise. The music of the Final Fantasy series refers to the soundtracks of the Final Fantasy series of video games, as well as the surrounding medley of soundtrack, arranged, and compilation albums. The series' music ranges from very light background music to emotionally intense interweavings of character and situation leitmotifs.

The Black Mages were a Japanese instrumental rock band formed in 2002 by Nobuo Uematsu, Kenichiro Fukui and Tsuyoshi Sekito, who were three video game composers for Square Enix. The band arranged Uematsu's Final Fantasy video game series-based compositions in a hard rock style often similar to progressive metal, achieved with the additional use of synthesizers. Since its inception, the band had expanded to six members with the addition of Keiji Kawamori, Michio Okamiya and Arata Hanyuda. In August 2010, Uematsu announced the band had been disbanded, but he would continue to perform rock arrangements of his music as a part of another similar band, known as the Earthbound Papas.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy X was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu, along with Masashi Hamauzu and Junya Nakano. It was the first title in the main Final Fantasy series in which Uematsu was not the sole composer. The Final Fantasy X Original Soundtrack was released on four Compact Discs in 2001 by DigiCube, and was re-released in 2004 by Square Enix. Prior to the album's North American release, a reduced version entitled Final Fantasy X Original Soundtrack was released on a single disk by Tokyopop in 2002. An EP entitled feel/Go dream: Yuna & Tidus containing additional singles not present in the game was released by DigiCube in 2001. Piano Collections Final Fantasy X, a collection of piano arrangements of the original soundtracks by Masashi Hamauzu and performed by Aki Kuroda, was released by DigiCube in 2002 and re-released by Square EA in 2004. A collection of vocal arrangements of pieces from the game arranged by Katsumi Suyama along with radio drama tracks was released as Final Fantasy X Vocal Collection in 2002 by DigiCube.

Final Fantasy VII is a role-playing video game developed by Square and published by Sony Computer Entertainment as the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. Released in 1997, the game sparked the release of a collection of media centered on the game entitled the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. The music of the Final Fantasy VII series includes not only the soundtrack to the original game and its associated albums, but also the soundtracks and music albums released for the other titles in the collection. The first album produced was Final Fantasy VII Original Soundtrack, a compilation of all the music in the game. It was released as a soundtrack album on four CDs by DigiCube in 1997. A selection of tracks from the album was released in the single-disc Reunion Tracks by DigiCube the same year. Piano Collections Final Fantasy VII, an album featuring piano arrangements of pieces from the soundtrack, was released in 2003 by DigiCube, and Square Enix began reprinting all three albums in 2004. To date, these are the only released albums based on the original game's soundtrack, and were solely composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu; his role for the majority of subsequent albums has been filled by Masashi Hamauzu and Takeharu Ishimoto.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy VI was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. The Final Fantasy VI Original Sound Version, a compilation of all the music in the game, was released in Japan by NTT Publishing in 1994 and re-released by Square Enix in 2004. The album was released by Square Co./NTT Publishing in North America in 1994 under the name Kefka's Domain. Selected tracks from the official soundtrack were later released as part of the Music From FFV and FFVI Video Games album that was included with the release of Final Fantasy Anthology, and two EPs were produced containing character theme tracks entitled Final Fantasy VI Stars Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. A special orchestral arrangement of selected tracks from the game, arranged by Shiro Sagisu and Tsuneyoshi Saito, and performed by the Milan Symphony Orchestra, was released under the title Final Fantasy VI Grand Finale by NTT Publishing in 1994 and 2004, and a collection of piano arrangements, arranged by Shirou Satou and performed by Reiko Nomura, was released under the title Piano Collections Final Fantasy VI by Square/NTT Publishing in 1994 and by NTT Publishing in 2001. Additionally, a single containing unused and remixed tracks from the game was released as Final Fantasy VI Special Tracks by NTT Publishing in 1994.

Kumi Tanioka Japanese composer

Kumi Tanioka is a Japanese video game music composer and pianist. Born in Hiroshima, Japan, she graduated from Kobe University with a degree in musical performance, and began working as a video game composer in 1998. She joined video game developer and publisher Square that same year, and worked on over 15 games for them before leaving to work as an independent composer in 2010. She is most known for composing for the Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles series, which she composed for Square Enix. Tanioka has a style of "world music", whereby she combines instruments from different parts of the world into one cohesive sound. She also likes to incorporate piano music into her soundtracks, which she typically performs herself, as she has done as a part of The Star Onions, a musical group focusing on arrangements of Final Fantasy XI music made up of Square Enix composers, as well as on her own at various concerts, such as 2011's Final Fantasy XI-themed VanaCon.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy XII was composed primarily by Hitoshi Sakimoto. Additional music was provided by Masaharu Iwata and Hayato Matsuo, who also orchestrated the opening and ending themes. Former regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu's only work for this game was "Kiss Me Good-Bye", the theme song sung by Angela Aki. The Final Fantasy XII Original Soundtrack was released on four Compact Discs in 2006 by Aniplex. A sampling of tracks from the soundtrack was released as an album entitled Selections from Final Fantasy XII Original Soundtrack, and was released in 2006 by Tofu Records. Additionally, a promotional digital album titled The Best of Final Fantasy XII was released on the Japanese localization of iTunes for download only in 2006. "Kiss Me Good-Bye" was released by Epic Records as a single in 2006, and Symphonic Poem "Hope", the complete music from the game's end credits, was released by Hats Unlimited in 2006. An abridged version of the latter piece, which originally accompanied a promotional video for the game, was included in the official soundtrack album. An album of piano arrangements, titled Piano Collections Final Fantasy XII, was released by Square Enix in 2012.

The music of the video games Final Fantasy and Final Fantasy II was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu, who would go on to be the exclusive composer for the next seven Final Fantasy games. Although they were composed separately, music from the two games has only been released together. All Sounds of Final Fantasy I•II, a compilation of almost all of the music in the games, was released by DataM/Polystar in 1989, and subsequently re-released by NTT Publishing in 1994. Symphonic Suite Final Fantasy, an arranged album of music from the two games by Katsuhisa Hattori and his son Takayuki Hattori was released by DataM in 1989, and re-released by NTT Publishing/Polystar in 1994. Final Fantasy & Final Fantasy II Original Soundtrack, another arranged album, this time by Nobuo Uematsu and Tsuyoshi Sekito, was released in 2002 by DigiCube and again in 2004 by Square Enix.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy X-2 was composed by Noriko Matsueda and Takahito Eguchi. Regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu did not contribute any of the music, despite having composed the majority of the soundtrack for the first game, Final Fantasy X. The Final Fantasy X-2 Original Soundtrack was released on two Compact Discs in 2003 by Avex. After the release of Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission, an album entitled Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission Original Soundtrack composed of the songs added to the soundtrack for that game was released in 2003 by Avex. Final Fantasy X-2 Piano Collection, a collection of piano arrangements of the original soundtracks by Noriko Matsueda, Takahito Eguchi, Hiroko Kokubu, Masahiro Sayama, and Febian Reza Pane, was released by Avex in 2004.

The music of the Final Fantasy Tactics series, composed of Final Fantasy Tactics, Final Fantasy Tactics Advance, Final Fantasy Tactics A2: Grimoire of the Rift, and Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions, was primarily composed by Hitoshi Sakimoto. He was assisted by Masaharu Iwata in composing the music for Final Fantasy Tactics. The Final Fantasy Tactics Original Soundtrack, a compilation of almost all of the music in the game, was released by DigiCube in 1997, and re-released by Square Enix in 2006. No separate soundtrack has been released for Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions. The soundtrack was well received by critics, who found it to be astounding and one of the best video game music soundtracks in existence at the time of its release.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy VIII was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. The Final Fantasy VIII Original Soundtrack, a compilation of all music in the game, was released on four Compact Discs by DigiCube in Japan, and by Square EA in North America. A special orchestral arrangement of selected tracks from the game—arranged by Shirō Hamaguchi—was released under the title Fithos Lusec Wecos Vinosec Final Fantasy VIII, and a collection of piano arrangements—performed by Shinko Ogata—was released under the title Piano Collections Final Fantasy VIII.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy IV was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. The Final Fantasy IV Original Sound Version, a compilation of almost all of the music in the game, was released by Square Co./NTT Publishing, and subsequently re-released by NTT Publishing. It was released in North America by Tokyopop as Final Fantasy IV Official Soundtrack: Music from Final Fantasy Chronicles, with one additional track. It has since been re-released multiple times with slight changes as part of the Final Fantasy Finest Box and as Final Fantasy IV DS OST. An arranged album entitled Final Fantasy IV Celtic Moon, containing a selection of musical tracks from the game performed in the style of Celtic music by Máire Breatnach, was released by Square and later re-released by NTT Publishing. Additionally, a collection of piano arrangements composed by Nobuo Uematsu and played by Toshiyuki Mori titled Piano Collections Final Fantasy IV was released by NTT Publishing.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy III was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. Final Fantasy III Original Sound Version, a compilation of almost all of the music in the game, was released by Square Co./NTT Publishing in 1991, and subsequently re-released by NTT Publishing in 1994 and 2004. The soundtrack to the remake of Final Fantasy III for the Nintendo DS, Final Fantasy III Original Soundtrack was released by NTT Publishing in 2006, with revamped versions of the tracks and additional tracks. A vocal arrangement album entitled Final Fantasy III Yūkyū no Kaze Densetsu, or literally Final Fantasy III Legend of the Eternal Wind, contained a selection of musical tracks from the game. The tracks were performed by Nobuo Uematsu and Dido, a duo composed of Michiaki Kato and Shizuru Ohtaka. The album was released by Data M in 1990 and by Polystar in 1994.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy IX was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. It was his last exclusive Final Fantasy score. The Final Fantasy IX Original Soundtrack, a compilation of all music in the game, was originally released on four Compact Discs by DigiCube in 2000, and was re-released by Square Enix in 2004. A Best Of and arranged soundtrack album of musical tracks from the game entitled Final Fantasy IX: Uematsu's Best Selection was released in 2000 by Tokyopop Soundtrax. Final Fantasy IX Original Soundtrack PLUS, an album of music from the game's full motion videos and extra tracks, was released by DigiCube in 2000 and re-released in 2004, and a collection of piano arrangements of pieces from the original soundtrack arranged by Shirō Hamaguchi and performed by Louis Leerink was released as Piano Collections Final Fantasy IX in 2001.

The Chocobo video game series is a spin-off series composed of over a dozen games developed by Square Co. and later by Square Enix featuring a super deformed version of the Chocobo, a Final Fantasy series mascot and fictional bird, as the protagonist. Several of the titles have received separate album releases of music from the game. The music of the Chocobo series includes soundtrack albums for the Chocobo's Mysterious Dungeon sub-series—comprising Chocobo's Mysterious Dungeon, Chocobo's Dungeon 2, and Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo's Dungeon—and soundtrack albums of music from Chocobo Racing, Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo Tales, and Chocobo and the Magic Picture Book: The Witch, The Maiden, and the Five Heroes, as well as an album of arranged music from Chocobo's Mysterious Dungeon and a single entitled Chocobo no Fushigina Dungeon Toki Wasure No Meikyuu: Door Crawl for the theme song of Final Fantasy Fables: Chocobo's Dungeon.

The Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles video game series consists of Crystal Chronicles, a spin-off of the main Final Fantasy series, its sequels My Life as a King and My Life as a Darklord, and their spin-offs, Ring of Fates, Echoes of Time and The Crystal Bearers. Crystal Chronicles, Ring of Fates, and Echoes of Time have had released soundtrack albums to date, and Crystal Chronicles and Ring of Fates each have an associated single. Kumi Tanioka is the main composer for the series, having composed the three released soundtracks as well as the music for My Life as a King and My Life as a Darklord. Hidenori Iwasaki is filling that role for The Crystal Bearers. Nobuo Uematsu, the main composer for the regular Final Fantasy series, contributed one track to the Ring of Fates soundtrack. Yae and Donna Burke sang the Japanese and English versions of the theme song for Crystal Chronicles, respectively, while Aiko sang the theme song for Ring of Fates.

Final Fantasy is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi and owned by Square Enix that includes video games, motion pictures, and other merchandise. The original Final Fantasy video game, published in 1987, is a role-playing video game developed by Square, spawning a video game series that became the central focus of the franchise. The primary composer of music for the main series was Nobuo Uematsu, who single-handedly composed the soundtracks for the first nine games, as well as directing the production of many of the soundtrack albums. Music for the spin-off series and main series games beginning with Final Fantasy X was created by a variety of composers including Masashi Hamauzu, Naoshi Mizuta, Hitoshi Sakimoto, and Kumi Tanioka, as well as many others.

Final Fantasy XIII-2 is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square Enix in 2011 as the sequel to Final Fantasy XIII. The music of the game was composed by Masashi Hamauzu, Naoshi Mizuta, and Mitsuto Suzuki. It was intended to sound different from the music of previous Final Fantasy titles, featuring more musical styles and vocal pieces. Since the release of the game, Square Enix has published the 2011 four-disc soundtrack album, Final Fantasy XIII-2 Original Soundtrack, as well as an album of arrangements and alternate versions of tracks from the game, Final Fantasy XIII Original Soundtrack PLUS, in 2012. The theme song for the game, "Yakusoku no Basho", was released by singer Mai Fukui as a single in 2011, and the English version of the song, sung by Charice Pempengco and included in the non-Japanese versions of the game, was included on her 2012 album Infinity.

The music for the MMORPG Final Fantasy XIV was composed by Nobuo Uematsu, a regular contributor to the music of the Final Fantasy series. Several other composers including Masayoshi Soken and Naoshi Mizuta contributed music for updates to the game. The music for the game's reboot, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, was primarily composed by Soken, who was the sound director for both releases of the game. Music from both releases of the game has been released in several albums, though no album contains music from both XIV and A Realm Reborn. A pair of mini-albums containing a handful of selected tracks from XIV, Final Fantasy XIV: Battle Tracks and Final Fantasy XIV: Field Tracks, were released by Square Enix in 2010 when XIV first launched. A soundtrack album titled Final Fantasy XIV - Eorzean Frontiers, containing most of the music that had been released by that point for XIV, was digitally released in 2012. A final soundtrack album for the original release of the game, Before Meteor: Final Fantasy XIV Original Soundtrack, was released in 2013 just before the launch of A Realm Reborn, and contains all of the music that was composed for XIV throughout its lifetime. The latest soundtrack album, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn Original Soundtrack, was released in 2014, and contains all of the music for A Realm Reborn released up to that point.

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