Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call

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Theatrythm Final Fantasy:
Curtain Call
Theatrhythm Final Fantasy Curtain Call US cover.jpg
North American cover art
Developer(s) Square Enix 1st Production Department
indieszero
Publisher(s) Square Enix
Director(s) Masanobu Suzui
Producer(s) Ichiro Hazama
Artist(s) Monster Octupus
Composer(s)
Series Final Fantasy
Theatrhythm
Platform(s) Nintendo 3DS
Release
  • JP: April 24, 2014
  • NA: September 16, 2014
  • AU: September 18, 2014
  • EU: September 19, 2014
Genre(s) Rhythm
Mode(s) Single-player, multiplayer

Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call [lower-alpha 1] is a rhythm video game. A sequel to the 2012 video game Theatrhythm Final Fantasy and the second title in the rhythm series, it features similar gameplay to its predecessor. It was released for the Nintendo 3DS on April 24, 2014 in Japan, on September 16, 2014 in North America, on September 18, 2014 in Australia, and in Europe on September 19, 2014.

Rhythm game genre of music-themed action video game

Rhythm game or rhythm action is a genre of music-themed action video game that challenges a player's sense of rhythm. Games in the genre typically focus on dance or the simulated performance of musical instruments, and require players to press buttons in a sequence dictated on the screen. Doing so causes the game's protagonist or avatar to dance or to play their instrument correctly, which increases the player's score. Many rhythm games include multiplayer modes in which players compete for the highest score or cooperate as a simulated musical ensemble. While conventional control pads may be used as input devices, rhythm games often feature novel game controllers that emulate musical instruments. Certain dance-based games require the player to physically dance on a mat, with pressure-sensitive pads acting as the input device.

Video game electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a video device such as a TV screen or computer monitor

A video game is an electronic game that involves interaction with a user interface to generate visual feedback on a two- or three-dimensional video display device such as a TV screen, virtual reality headset or computer monitor. Since the 1980s, video games have become an increasingly important part of the entertainment industry, and whether they are also a form of art is a matter of dispute.

<i>Theatrhythm Final Fantasy</i> 2012 video game

Theatrhythm Final Fantasy is a rhythm video game, developed by indieszero and published by Square Enix for Nintendo 3DS and iOS. Based on the Final Fantasy video game franchise, the game involves using the touch screen in time to various pieces of music from the series. The game was released in Japan in February 2012, and in North America, Australia and Europe in July 2012. An iOS version was released in December 2012. A sequel, Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call, was released in 2014. A third game based on the Dragon Quest series, Theatrhythm Dragon Quest, was released in 2015. An arcade game, Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: All-Star Carnival, was released in 2016.

Contents

Gameplay

As with Theatrhythm Final Fantasy, Curtain Call is a rhythm video game. Players use characters from across the Final Fantasy series to navigate through songs in rhythm games. Players go through the various stages and modes collecting Rhythm Points: the better the player performs, the more Rhythm Points the player gains at the end of the stage. The game is split up into three different gameplay modes: Field Stages, where the player controls one character, Battle songs, where teams of characters face off against enemies and bosses, and Event Stages, which features songs played against a full-motion video background of the game or film the music is drawn from. A new Versus mode is included where two players face off against each other in multiplayer using the game song. [1]

Curtain Call includes 221 songs not counting downloadable content (DLC) taken from various entries in the series. Along with the songs and DLC content created for the original and fresh songs from titles features in the original, the game features new songs from Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn , Final Fantasy X-2 , Final Fantasy XIII 's two sequels XIII-2 and Lightning Returns , Final Fantasy Type-0 , the movie Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children and other spin-off games in the franchise such as Final Fantasy Adventure , and the Crystal Chronicles and Dissidia games. [2] [3] There are 60 playable characters available to the player, not including DLC. [1]

Downloadable content (DLC) is additional content created for a released video game. It is distributed through the Internet by the game's official publisher. Downloadable content can be of several types, ranging from aesthetic outfit changes to a new, extensive storyline, similar to an expansion pack. As such, DLC may add new game modes, objects, levels, challenges, or other features to a complete, already-released game. It is a form of video game monetization, enabling a publisher to gain additional revenue from a title after it has been purchased by offering DLC at low costs, frequently using a type of microtransaction system for payment.

<i>Final Fantasy X-2</i> 2003 video game

Final Fantasy X-2 is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square for the PlayStation 2, as the direct sequel to Final Fantasy X. The game's story follows the character Yuna from Final Fantasy X as she seeks to resolve political conflicts in the fictional world of Spira before they lead to war and to search for her lost love Tidus from Final Fantasy X.

<i>Final Fantasy XIII</i> 2010 role-playing video game

Final Fantasy XIII is a science fiction role-playing video game developed and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 consoles and later for the Microsoft Windows operating system. Released in Japan in December 2009 and worldwide in March 2010, it is the thirteenth title in the mainline Final Fantasy series. The game includes fast-paced combat, a new system for the series for determining which abilities are developed for the characters called "Crystarium", and a customizable "Paradigm" system to control which abilities are used by the characters. Final Fantasy XIII includes elements from the previous games in the series, such as summoned monsters, chocobos, and airships.

Field Stages are linked to the characters the stages are drawn from: if the player is going through an airship level to music from Final Fantasy V, it will use the airship from the game. After finishing a level, the player and character(s) earn crystals, and the player is presented with a selection of new characters to pick from. [4] During battle sequences, players can perform a Critical Hit Trigger on an enemy after hitting specific notes. In Versus mode, a special EX Burst gauge fills up, and when full allows nine different EX Burst Skills, which are used to put the other player at a disadvantage. A new mode, called Medley Quests, was added, where the player completes quests defeats bosses and gains new characters. The Museum feature returns, where players can review their scores and loot. During Field Stages, a Fat Chocobo will appear at random, granting the player various pieces of loot. [5] For battle mode, players assemble four-character teams. Spells for healing and such are used automatically when the player strikes specific notes. [1] A new "Daily Feature" is available, where a new song is presented to the player each day, and upon successful completion the player receives 1.5x the normal amount of Rhythm Points. [5]

Development

The first sign of Curtain Call's existence came in September 2013, when the trademark was registered for North America. [6] The title was announced nearly two weeks later in Shonen Jump magazine. [7] According to producer Ichiro Hazama, it is to be the last Theatrhythm, though it will serve as the base for future additions to the game such as DLC and other content in the future. [8] An English demo was released on the Nintendo eShop on September 4, 2014, which will unlock characters in the full game if downloaded. [9]

<i>Shonen Jump</i> (magazine)

Shonen Jump, officially stylized SHONEN JUMP and abbreviated SJ, was a shōnen manga anthology published in North America by Viz Media. It debuted in November 2002 with the first issue having a January 2003 cover date. Based on Shueisha's popular Japanese magazine Weekly Shōnen Jump, Shonen Jump is retooled for English readers and the American audience, including changing it from a weekly publication to a monthly one. It features serialized chapters from four manga series, and articles on Japanese language and culture, as well as manga, anime, video games, and figurines. Prior to the magazine's launch, Viz launched an extensive marketing campaign to promote it and help it succeed where previous manga anthologies published in North America had failed. Shueisha purchased an equity interest in Viz to help fund the venture, and Cartoon Network, Suncoast, and Diamond Distributors became promotional partners in the magazine.

Nintendo eShop digital application distribution platform for the Nintendo 3DS, Wii U and Switch

The Nintendo eShop is a digital distribution service powered by the Nintendo Network for the Nintendo 3DS, Wii U, and Nintendo Switch and by a dedicated online infrastructure for the Nintendo Switch. Launched in June 2011 on the Nintendo 3DS, the eShop was enabled by the release of a system update that added the functionality to the Nintendo 3DS's HOME Menu. It is the successor to both the Wii Shop Channel and DSi Shop. Unlike on the Nintendo 3DS, the eShop was made available on the launch date of the Wii U, although a system update is required in order to access it. It is also a multitasking application, which means it is easily accessible even when a game is already running in the background through the system software, though this feature is exclusive to the Wii U and the Nintendo Switch. The Nintendo eShop features downloadable games, demos, applications, streaming videos, consumer rating feedback, and other information on upcoming game releases.

Reception

Reception
Aggregate score
AggregatorScore
Metacritic 83/100 [10]
Review scores
PublicationScore
Destructoid 8/10 [11]
Edge 6/10 [12]
EGM 9/10 [13]
Famitsu 35/40 [14]
Game Informer 8/10 [15]
Game Revolution Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svg [16]
GameSpot 8/10 [17]
GameTrailers 8.3/10 [18]
GameZone9.5/10 [19]
IGN 8.5/10 [20]
Joystiq Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar half.svg [21]
Polygon 8/10 [22]
Digital Spy Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [23]
Slant Magazine Star full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svg [24]

Theatrhythm Final Fantasy: Curtain Call received a positive reception in Japan. The game scored 35/40 from Famitsu , with the four reviewers giving scores of 9, 9, 9 and 8. [14] In its first week on sale in Japan, the game sold 80,523 copies, going through 55.72% of its shipment. Square Enix deliberately shipped a large quantity of the game because sales of the previous Theatrhythm were so strong that there were supply problems. [25]

<i>Famitsu</i> periodical literature

Famitsu, formerly Famicom Tsūshin, is a line of Japanese video game magazines published by Enterbrain, Inc. and Tokuma. Famitsu is published in both weekly and monthly formats as well as in the form of special topical issues devoted to only one console, video game company, or other theme. Shūkan Famitsū, the original Famitsū publication, is considered the most widely read and respected video game news magazine in Japan. From October 28, 2011 Enterbrain began releasing the digital version of the magazine exclusively on BookWalker weekly.

Elsewhere, the game received "favorable" reviews according to the review aggregation website Metacritic. [10] Digital Spy gave it a score of four stars out of five and stated that "As a tribute to a franchise's greatest moments, it's almost unparalleled in its breadth and attention to detail, and whether you're a long-time fan or someone who has only skimmed through a few core entries, there's no better way to revisit the series." [23] Slant Magazine also gave it a similar score of four stars out of five and said, "While there may not be anything new in Curtain Call, there sure is a lot of it. And if you think their games have grown stale, here's proof that at least their music hasn't." [24] However, Shacknews gave it a score of seven out of ten and said, "It's too bad that now that the company has shown how well it can work, it's taking a bow." [26]

Notes

  1. Known in Japanese as シアトリズム ファイナルファンタジーカーテンコール(Shiatorizumu Fainaru Fantajī Kātenkōrupronounced "theatre-rhythm"); Pronounced "theatre-rhythm".

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References

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