Eyes on Me (Faye Wong song)

Last updated
"Eyes on Me"
FayeWong-EyesOnMe.jpg
"Eyes on Me" CD single cover
Song by Faye Wong
ReleasedFebruary 24, 1999
FormatCD
Recorded1998[ citation needed ]
Genre Pop
Label Toshiba-EMI
Composer(s) Nobuo Uematsu
Lyricist(s) Kako Someya

"Eyes on Me" is a pop ballad performed by Chinese singer Faye Wong as a love theme for the video game Final Fantasy VIII . The music was composed by Nobuo Uematsu with English lyrics by Kako Someya. [1]

Popular music is music with wide appeal that is typically distributed to large audiences through the music industry. These forms and styles can be enjoyed and performed by people with little or no musical training. It stands in contrast to both art music and traditional or "folk" music. Art music was historically disseminated through the performances of written music, although since the beginning of the recording industry, it is also disseminated through recordings. Traditional music forms such as early blues songs or hymns were passed along orally, or to smaller, local audiences.

Faye Wong Chinese singer-songwriter and actress

Faye Wong is a Chinese singer-songwriter and actress, often referred to as "the Diva" in the Chinese-speaking world. Early in her career she briefly used the stage name Shirley Wong. Born in Beijing, she moved to British Hong Kong in 1987 and came to public attention in the early 1990s by singing in Cantonese, often combining alternative music with mainstream Chinese pop. Since 1994 she has recorded mostly in her native Mandarin. In 2000 she was recognised by Guinness World Records as the Best Selling Canto-Pop Female. Following her second marriage in 2005 she withdrew from the limelight, but returned to the stage in 2010 amidst immense interest.

Theme music is a piece that is often written specifically for a radio program, television program, video game, or movie and is usually played during the intro, opening credits, and/or ending credits.

Contents

Single

The song was released as a CD single in Japan on February 24, 1999. It was the first song in video game history to win an award at the 14th Annual Japan Gold Disc Awards, where it won "Song of the Year (Western Music)" in 2000. [2] [3] [4]

CD single music single in the form of a standard size compact disc

A CD single is a music single in the form of a compact disc. The standard in the Red Book for the term CD single is an 8cm CD. It now refers to any single recorded onto a CD of any size, particularly the CD5, or 5-inch CD single. The format was introduced in the mid-1980s but did not gain its place in the market until the early 1990s. With the rise in digital downloads in the early 2010s, sales of CD singles have decreased.

History of video games aspect of history

The history of video games goes as far back as the early 1950s, when academic computer scientists began designing simple games and simulations as part of their research or just for fun. At M.I.T. in the 1960s, professors and students played games such as 3D tic-tac-toe and Moon Landing. These games were played on computer such as the IBM 1560, and moves were made by means of punch cards. Video gaming did not reach mainstream popularity until the 1970s and 1980s, when video arcade games and gaming consoles using joysticks, buttons, and other controllers, along with graphics on computer screens and home computer games were introduced to the general public. Since the 1980s, video gaming has become a popular form of entertainment and a part of modern popular culture in most parts of the world. One of the early games was Spacewar!, which was developed by computer scientists. Early arcade video games developed from 1972 to 1978. During the 1970s, the first generation of home consoles emerged, including the popular game Pong and various "clones". The 1970s was also the era of mainframe computer games. The golden age of arcade video games was from 1978 to 1982. Video arcades with large, graphics-decorated coin-operated machines were common at malls and popular, affordable home consoles such as the Atari 2600 and Intellivision enabled people to play games on their home TVs. During the 1980s, gaming computers, early online gaming and handheld LCD games emerged; this era was affected by the video game crash of 1983. From 1976 to 1992, the second generation of video consoles emerged.

The Japan Gold Disc Award (日本ゴールドディスク大賞) for music sales in the Recording Industry Association of Japan, is major music awards held annually in Japan.

It sold over 500,000 copies, [5] placing it as the best-selling video game music disc ever released in Japan until the release of "Hikari" by Utada Hikaru for Kingdom Hearts . [6]

Video game music is the soundtrack that accompanies video games. Early video game music was once limited to simple melodies of early sound synthesizer technology. These limitations inspired the style of music known as chiptunes, which combines simple melodic styles with more complex patterns or traditional music styles, and became the most popular sound of the first video games.

Utada Hikaru Japanese-American musician (1983-)

Hikaru Utada, who has also gone by Utada Hikaru and the mononym Utada, is a Japanese-American singer-songwriter and producer. Born in the United States to Japanese parents, record producer Utada Teruzane and enka singer Keiko Fuji, Utada began to write music and lyrics at an early age and often traveled to Tokyo, as a result of her father's job. Eventually, a recording contract with Toshiba-EMI was signed and, under the stage name "Cubic U", Utada released her English-language début album Precious in early 1998, but was a commercial failure. In the following year, heavily influenced by R&B and dance-pop, her Japanese-language début First Love was released and became an instant success. Backed by the massive success of singles "Automatic", "Time Will Tell" and "Movin' On Without You", the album sold two million copies in its first week in Japan, topped the Oricon charts for six non-consecutive weeks and went on to sell six million more throughout the rest of 1999. First Love eventually became the country's best-selling album of all time.

<i>Kingdom Hearts</i> video game series

Kingdom Hearts is a series of action role-playing games developed and published by Square Enix. It is a collaboration between Disney Interactive and Square Enix, and is under the direction of Tetsuya Nomura, a longtime Square Enix character designer.

The B-side was a ballad, "Red Beans" (simplified Chinese : ; traditional Chinese : ; pinyin :hóng dòu), composed by Jim Lau with Mandarin lyrics by Lin Xi. The Japanese title for it was "Akashia no Mi"(アカシアの実,"Acacia Seeds"). It had been included in Faye Wong's 1998 album Sing and Play , along with a Cantonese version "Repayment" (simplified Chinese : ; traditional Chinese : ; Jyutping :seung4 waan4), and was popular in its own right.

Simplified Chinese characters Standardized Chinese characters developed in mainland China

Simplified Chinese characters are standardized Chinese characters prescribed in the Table of General Standard Chinese Characters for use in mainland China. Along with traditional Chinese characters, they are one of the two standard character sets of the contemporary Chinese written language. The government of the People's Republic of China in mainland China has promoted them for use in printing since the 1950s and 1960s to encourage literacy. They are officially used in the People's Republic of China and Singapore.

Traditional Chinese characters Traditional Chinese characters

Traditional Chinese characters are Chinese characters in any character set that does not contain newly created characters or character substitutions performed after 1946. They are most commonly the characters in the standardized character sets of Taiwan, of Hong Kong and Macau. The modern shapes of traditional Chinese characters first appeared with the emergence of the clerical script during the Han Dynasty, and have been more or less stable since the 5th century.

Pinyin Chinese romanization scheme for Mandarin

Hanyu Pinyin, often abbreviated to pinyin, is the official romanization system for Standard Chinese in mainland China and to some extent in Taiwan. It is often used to teach Standard Mandarin Chinese, which is normally written using Chinese characters. The system includes four diacritics denoting tones. Pinyin without tone marks is used to spell Chinese names and words in languages written with the Latin alphabet, and also in certain computer input methods to enter Chinese characters.

Track listing
No.TitleLength
1."Eyes on Me"5:36
2."Red Beans"4:15
3."Eyes on Me (Instrumental)"5:42

Theme song in the game

Near the end of the production of Final Fantasy VII , the developers suggested to use a singer, but abandoned the idea due to a lack of reasoning based on the game's theme and storyline. [7] However, Nobuo Uematsu thought a ballad would closely relate to the theme and characters of Final Fantasy VIII. This resulted in the game's developers sharing "countless" artists, eventually deciding on Faye Wong, a Chinese vocalist. Uematsu claims "her voice and mood seem to match my image of the song exactly", and that her ethnicity "fits the international image of Final Fantasy". After negotiations were made, "Eyes on Me" was recorded in Hong Kong with an orchestra. [8]

<i>Final Fantasy VII</i> 1997 video game

Final Fantasy VII is a 1997 role-playing video game developed by Square for the PlayStation console. It is the seventh main installment in the Final Fantasy series. Published in Japan by Square, it was released in other regions by Sony Computer Entertainment and became the first in the main series to see a PAL release. The game's story follows Cloud Strife, a mercenary who joins an eco-terrorist organization to stop a world-controlling megacorporation from using the planet's life essence as an energy source. Events send Cloud and his allies in pursuit of Sephiroth, a superhuman intent on destroying their planet. During the journey, Cloud builds close friendships with his party members, including Aerith Gainsborough, who holds the secret to saving their world.

Hong Kong East Asian city

Hong Kong, officially the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region of the People's Republic of China, is a special administrative region on the eastern side of the Pearl River estuary in southern China. With over 7.4 million people of various nationalities in a 1,104-square-kilometre (426 sq mi) territory, Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated places in the world.

Orchestra large instrumental ensemble

An orchestra is a large instrumental ensemble typical of classical music, which combines instruments from different families, including bowed string instruments such as the violin, viola, cello, and double bass, brass instruments such as the horn, trumpet, trombone and tuba, woodwinds such as the flute, oboe, clarinet and bassoon, and percussion instruments such as the timpani, bass drum, triangle, snare drum, cymbals, and mallet percussion instruments each grouped in sections. Other instruments such as the piano and celesta may sometimes appear in a fifth keyboard section or may stand alone, as may the concert harp and, for performances of some modern compositions, electronic instruments.

The lyrics, written in imperfect English, [9] unveil the hopes of a night club singer for romance with a member of her audience:

I kind of liked it your way
How you shyly placed your eyes on me;
Oh, did you ever know
That I had mine on you?

Within Final Fantasy VIII, the song is written by Julia Heartilly, a pianist who is a love interest of Laguna Loire. [10] It is heard repeatedly throughout the game in various incarnations as an instrumental piece, including a version entitled Julia. Its full version is heard during a moment between Squall Leonhart and Rinoa Heartilly—the main protagonists—on board the Ragnarok. It is played once more during the game's ending.

The song was popular among gamers in the West, and brought Faye Wong to the attention of many who were not previously familiar with her music. [11]

Other versions

A happy hardcore remix was recorded for the 2000 Dancemania compilation Speed 4 ., [12] and on the first greatest hits compilation of the Dancemania Speed series. [13] There is another dance remix of the song made by Almighty, later included on the Japanese release of Wong's 2000 album Fable , Dancemania X5, [14] and Dancemania Diamond Complete Edition (Millennium Hits Collection) [15]

In 2004, a version by Manami Kiyota entitled "Summer Album"(夏のアルバム,"Natsu no Arubamu") with Japanese lyrics by Kazushige Nojima was included on Final Fantasy Song Book: Mahoroba . [16]

The original song was also covered by Angela Aki for release on her 2006 single " Kokoro no Senshi ", with minor grammatical changes. [17] In an Excite Japan interview, Aki reports composer Nobuo Uematsu as saying her version 'shed light on "Eyes on Me"'. [18]

Covers by Kanon [19] and Susan Calloway [20] have also been made; these singers have also collaborated with Nobuo Uematsu on The Last Story and Final Fantasy XIV respectively.

A Korean language version of the song was covered by the singer MayBee. [21]

Charts

Chart (1999)Peak
position
Oricon Singles Chart [22] 9

See also

Related Research Articles

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Final Fantasy is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi and owned by Square Enix that includes video games, motion pictures, and other merchandise. The original Final Fantasy video game, published in 1987, is a role-playing video game developed by Square, spawning a video game series that became the central focus of the franchise. The primary composer of music for the main series was Nobuo Uematsu, who single-handedly composed the soundtracks for the first nine games, as well as directing the production of many of the soundtrack albums. Music for the spin-off series and main series games beginning with Final Fantasy X was created by a variety of composers including Masashi Hamauzu, Naoshi Mizuta, Hitoshi Sakimoto, and Kumi Tanioka, as well as many others.

The music for the MMORPG Final Fantasy XIV was composed by Nobuo Uematsu, a regular contributor to the music of the Final Fantasy series. Several other composers including Masayoshi Soken and Naoshi Mizuta contributed music for updates to the game. The music for the game's reboot, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn, was primarily composed by Soken, who was the sound director for both releases of the game. Music from both releases of the game has been released in several albums, though no album contains music from both XIV and A Realm Reborn. A pair of mini-albums containing a handful of selected tracks from XIV, Final Fantasy XIV: Battle Tracks and Final Fantasy XIV: Field Tracks, were released by Square Enix in 2010 when XIV first launched. A soundtrack album titled Final Fantasy XIV - Eorzean Frontiers, containing most of the music that had been released by that point for XIV, was digitally released in 2012. A final soundtrack album for the original release of the game, Before Meteor: Final Fantasy XIV Original Soundtrack, was released in 2013 just before the launch of A Realm Reborn, and contains all of the music that was composed for XIV throughout its lifetime. The latest soundtrack album, Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn Original Soundtrack, was released in 2014, and contains all of the music for A Realm Reborn released up to that point.

References

  1. "Final Fantasy VIII - Eyes on Me". Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2016-03-05. Retrieved 2018-09-20.
  2. "Walt Disney Concert Hall - Nobuo Uematsu". Walt Disney Concert Hall. Archived from the original on 2008-03-22. Retrieved 2007-03-15.
  3. Japan Gold Disc Award 2000
  4. ゴールドディスク大賞受賞者一覧 [List of Gold Disc Awards](PDF) (in Japanese). Recording Industry Association of Japan. p. 7. Retrieved 2012-02-15.
  5. Greening, Chris. "Square Enix Album Sales". Square Enix Music Online. Retrieved 5 August 2011.
  6. Square Enix USA site staff. "Nobuo Uematsu's Profile". Square Enix USA. Archived from the original on 12 March 2009. Retrieved 17 March 2006.
  7. Mielke, James (2008-02-15). "A Day in the Life of Final Fantasy's Nobuo Uematsu". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on 2013-02-06. Retrieved 2008-08-05.
  8. Maeda, Yoshitake (1999). Final Fantasy VIII Original Soundtrack (Limited Edition). DigiCube.
  9. "Final Fantasy VIII: Eyes on Me - Faye Wong". Square Enix Music Online. Retrieved 2009-10-11. a prime example of Engrish
  10. Raine: "Then the first song she released was 'Eyes On Me'?" / Laguna: "H-How does the song go?" / Raine: "You don't know?" / Laguna: "Well, you never let me hear it!" / Raine: "I didn't think you listened to music. The song's about being in love... I really like it." (Final Fantasy VIII)
  11. The changing musical tastes of China, BBC News, 23 August 2005. Retrieved 10 May 2011.
  12. Discogs, Dancemania Speed 4
  13. Discogs, Dancemania Speed Best 2001 Hyper Nonstop Megamix
  14. Discogs, Dancemania X5
  15. Discogs, Dancemania Diamond Complete Edition (Millennium Hits Collection)
  16. Mahoroba track list Archived 2009-08-26 at the Wayback Machine , Universal Music
  17. "Angela Aki/Kokoro no Senshi". Neowing. Retrieved 2007-03-27.
  18. "Interview" (in Japanese). Excite.co.jp. 2005-03-06. Archived from the original on 2008-04-10. Retrieved 2010-12-04.
  19. Eyes on Me by Kanon on YouTube
  20. Eyes on Me by Susan Calloway on YouTube
  21. Eyes on Me by MayBee on YouTube
  22. http://www.oricon.co.jp/prof/artist/139259/products/music/272358/1/