Music of Final Fantasy X-2

Last updated

The music of the video game Final Fantasy X-2 was composed by Noriko Matsueda and Takahito Eguchi. Regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu did not contribute any of the music, despite having composed the majority of the soundtrack for the first game, Final Fantasy X . The Final Fantasy X-2 Original Soundtrack was released on two Compact Discs in 2003 by Avex. After the release of Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission, an album entitled Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission Original Soundtrack composed of the songs added to the soundtrack for that game was released in 2003 by Avex. Final Fantasy X-2 Piano Collection, a collection of piano arrangements of the original soundtracks by Noriko Matsueda, Takahito Eguchi, Hiroko Kokubu, Masahiro Sayama, and Febian Reza Pane, was released by Avex in 2004.

<i>Final Fantasy X-2</i> 2003 video game

Final Fantasy X-2 is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square for the PlayStation 2, as the direct sequel to Final Fantasy X. The game's story follows the character Yuna from Final Fantasy X as she seeks to resolve political conflicts in the fictional world of Spira before they lead to war and to search for her lost love Tidus from Final Fantasy X.

Noriko Matsueda is a Japanese former video game composer. She is best known for her work on the Front Mission series, The Bouncer, and Final Fantasy X-2. Matsueda collaborated with fellow composer Takahito Eguchi on several games. Composing music at an early age, she began studying the piano and electronic organ when she was three years old. She graduated from the Tokyo Conservatoire Shobi, where she met Eguchi.

Takahito Eguchi is a Japanese video game composer, arranger, and orchestrator. He is best known for collaborating with fellow composer Noriko Matsueda on numerous soundtracks, most notably The Bouncer and Final Fantasy X-2. He became interested in music when he was six years old after hearing his neighbor playing the piano. He attended the Tokyo Conservatoire Shobi where he acquainted Matsueda.

Contents

A single by Koda Kumi entitled real Emotion/1000 no Kotoba, based on the theme song for the game and the ending credits song, was published by Rhythm Zone prior to the game's release in 2003. Another single, titled Kuon: Memories of Waves and Light – Music from Final Fantasy X-2, was released by Avex in 2003 along with the original soundtrack. It consisted of live arrangements of several of the game's songs, composed and arranged by Noriko Matsueda and Takahito Eguchi. A set of three singles entitled Final Fantasy X-2 Vocal Collection- Paine, Rikku, and Yuna was published by Avex in 2003, with each single including vocal arrangements of songs from the game, sung by the respective character's voice actress.

Single (music) Type of music release usually containing one or two tracks

In the music industry, a single is a type of release, typically a song recording of fewer tracks than an LP record or an album. This can be released for sale to the public in a variety of different formats. In most cases, a single is a song that is released separately from an album, although it usually also appears on an album. Typically, these are the songs from albums that are released separately for promotional uses such as digital download or commercial radio airplay and are expected to be the most popular. In other cases a recording released as a single may not appear on an album.

Koda Kumi Japanese singer

Kumiko Kōda, known professionally as Koda Kumi, is a Japanese singer from Kyoto, known for her urban and R&B songs. After debuting with the single "Take Back" in December 2000, Koda gained fame in March 2003 when the songs from her seventh single, "Real Emotion/1000 no Kotoba", were used as themes for the video game Final Fantasy X-2. Her popularity grew with the release of her fourth studio album Secret (2005), her sixteenth single "Butterfly" (2005), and her first greatest hits album Best: First Things (2005), reaching the number-three, number-two, and number-one spots respectively.

Rhythm Zone (RZN) is a record label in the Avex Group that releases urban contemporary Japanese music.

The soundtrack received mixed reviews from critics; while several felt that the music was good and keeping in tone with the game, others found it to be odd and shallow. Several reviewers attributed the change to the lack of participation by Uematsu. Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission Original Soundtrack and Final Fantasy X-2 Piano Collection, on the other hand, were very well received by critics, who felt that they were far superior to the original soundtrack. The singles for the soundtrack were poorly received by critics, who found a few of the songs to be enjoyable but all of the singles to be overpriced.

Music criticism

The Oxford Companion to Music defines music criticism as 'the intellectual activity of formulating judgements on the value and degree of excellence of individual works of music, or whole groups or genres'. In this sense, it is a branch of musical aesthetics. With the concurrent expansion of interest in music and information media over the past century, the term has come to acquire the conventional meaning of journalistic reporting on musical performances.

Concept and creation

Final Fantasy X-2 marks the first soundtrack where former Square composer Nobuo Uematsu did not contribute a single piece, despite having composed the majority of the soundtrack for the predecessor, Final Fantasy X , as he was already busy with other projects. [1] None of the pieces from the Final Fantasy X soundtrack were re-used in X-2. Noriko Matsueda and Takahito Eguchi were brought on board to compose the music for the game, as the developers felt they were the "perfect fit" to incorporate a "pop" style into the music. [1] The game includes two songs with vocalized elements, one of which, the J-Pop song "Real Emotion", was written by Ken Kato and composed by Kazuhiro Hara. The other, J-Pop ballad "1000 Words", was written by scenario writers Kazushige Nojima and Daisuke Watanabe. Matsueda and Eguchi composed and arranged the track. Both songs were sung by Jade Villalon from Sweetbox in the English version of the game, and are available as bonus tracks on the Japanese release of her album Adagio. [2] In the Japanese version of the game both the songs were sung by Koda Kumi, and were released as a single entitled real Emotion/1000 no Kotoba. Kumi also released her own English versions of the songs on her CD single Come with Me , with slightly different versions of the lyrics than Jade. [3]

Nobuo Uematsu Japanese video game composer

Nobuo Uematsu is a Japanese video game composer, best known for scoring most of the titles in the Final Fantasy series by Square Enix. He is considered to be one of the most well known composers in the video game industry. Sometimes referred to as the "Beethoven of video games music", he has appeared five times in the top 20 of the annual Classic FM Hall of Fame.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy X was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu, along with Masashi Hamauzu and Junya Nakano. It was the first title in the main Final Fantasy series in which Uematsu was not the sole composer. The Final Fantasy X Original Soundtrack was released on four Compact Discs in 2001 by DigiCube, and was re-released in 2004 by Square Enix. Prior to the album's North American release, a reduced version entitled Final Fantasy X Original Soundtrack was released on a single disk by Tokyopop in 2002. An EP entitled feel/Go dream: Yuna & Tidus containing additional singles not present in the game was released by DigiCube in 2001. Piano Collections Final Fantasy X, a collection of piano arrangements of the original soundtracks by Masashi Hamauzu and performed by Aki Kuroda, was released by DigiCube in 2002 and re-released by Square EA in 2004. A collection of vocal arrangements of pieces from the game arranged by Katsumi Suyama along with radio drama tracks was released as Final Fantasy X Vocal Collection in 2002 by DigiCube.

Ballad form of verse, often a narrative set to music

A ballad is a form of verse, often a narrative set to music. Ballads derive from the medieval French chanson balladée or ballade, which were originally "danced songs". Ballads were particularly characteristic of the popular poetry and song of Ireland and Britain from the later medieval period until the 19th century. They were widely used across Europe, and later in Australia, North Africa, North America and South America. Ballads are often 13 lines with an ABABBCBC form, consisting of couplets of rhymed verse, each of 14 syllables. Another common form is ABAB or ABCB repeated, in alternating 8 and 6 syllable lines.

Albums

Final Fantasy X-2 Original Soundtrack

Final Fantasy X-2 Original Soundtrack
Ffx2 front.jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedMarch 31, 2003
LengthDisk 1: 66:30
Disk 2: 72:06
Label Avex
Producer Noriko Matsueda, Takahito Eguchi

Final Fantasy X-2 Original Soundtrack is a soundtrack album of music from Final Fantasy X-2 composed, arranged and produced by Noriko Matsueda and Takahito Eguchi. The album spans two discs and 61 tracks, covering a duration of 2:18:00. It was released on March 31, 2003 in Japan by Avex bearing the catalog number AVCD-17254. It included a booklet filled with printed images, providing more information about the soundtrack. [4]

Final Fantasy X-2 Original Soundtrack sold 82,000 copies as of January 2010; it reached position #5 on the Japanese Oricon charts and remained on the charts for 12 weeks. [5] [6] The game's soundtrack was met with mixed feelings from critics, because Final Fantasy X-2's score was the first in the series without input from Nobuo Uematsu, [7] composer of all previous games in the main series, and because of the change to a distinct J-pop atmosphere. [8] [9] While IGN commented that the music provided an "appropriately fitting backdrop" [10] and 1UP.com suggested that it "certainly is in keeping with the new flavor", [11] others, such as Electronic Gaming Monthly, regarded it as "too bubbly". [8] One staff member at RPGamer suggested that "the absence of Uematsu proves deafening" and "the soundtrack that accompanies this nonsensical adventure manages to encapsulate the shallow nature of the game perfectly". [9] Ben Schweitzer of RPGFan found that the Final Fantasy X-2 Original Soundtrack album was unique and enjoyable, but "ultimately forgettable." [4] Liz Maas of RPGFan agreed, finding the album to be simultaneously "refreshing" and "odd". [4] Chris Heit of Soundtrack Central, however, found that the album had "good, original music", although altogether different than previous Final Fantasy soundtracks. [12]

Oricon Inc., established in 1999, is the holding company at the head of a Japanese corporate group that supplies statistics and information on music and the music industry in Japan. It started as Original Confidence Inc., which was founded by Sōkō Koike in November 1967 and became known for its music charts. Oricon Inc. was originally set up as a subsidiary of Original Confidence and took over the latter’s Oricon record charts in April 2002.

Track list

Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission Original Soundtrack

Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission Original Soundtrack is a soundtrack album of music from Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission composed, arranged and produced by Noriko Matsueda, Takahito Eguchi and Kazuhiro Hara. The album spans 10 tracks, covering a duration of 45:21. It includes the English versions of "real Emotion" and "1000 Words", performed by Jade Villalon of Sweetbox, as well as the eight tracks added for the International version of Final Fantasy X-2, released in Japan on February 19, 2004. The album was released on July 16, 2003 in Japan by Avex bearing the catalog number AVCD-17388. [13]

The album was better received than the original soundtrack, with Patrick Gann finding several of the tracks to be "beautiful" and the album as a whole "a sure step up from the X-2 OST". He concluded that "if you owned and kept the X-2 OST, you're a fool not to add this CD to your collection." [13] Chris of Square Enix Music Online had similar feelings for the album, terming it a "high-quality and surprising effort" and "an incredible improvement" over the original soundtrack. [14] The album reached #42 on the Oricon charts and remained on the charts for four weeks, selling over 9,800 copies. [15] [16]

Final Fantasy X-2 Piano Collection

Final Fantasy X-2 Piano Collection is a collection of music from the game's soundtrack composed by Noriko Matsueda and Takahito Eguchi and arranged for the piano. The tracks were arranged by Noriko Matsueda, Takahito Eguchi, Hiroko Kokubu, Masahiro Sayama, and Febian Reza Pane. Matsueda and Eguchi's tracks were performed by Shinko Ogata, while the other arrangers performed their own works. The album spans 12 tracks and covers a duration of 47:38. It was released on March 31, 2004 by Avex with catalog number AVCD-17444. [17]

The album was very well received, with Patrick Gann claiming that it "shines as a light in the darkness" compared to the original soundtrack and that he was "extremely pleased" with the album. [17] Chris from Square Enix Music Online agreed, calling the album "nothing short of fantastic" and saying that the pianists did "a flawless job executing each arrangement". [18] Jillian of Square Enix Music Online agreed, finding it to be the best Final Fantasy piano arrangement album to date. [19]

Singles

Real Emotion/1000 no Kotoba

"real Emotion/1000 no Kotoba"(real Emotion/1000の言葉,riaru Emōshon/Sen no Kotoba) is a double A-side by Koda Kumi, consisting of the songs "Real Emotion" and "1000 no Kotoba" (lit. "1000 words"), which are used as the opening and closing themes respectively of Square Enix's game Final Fantasy X-2 , which was used in a cut-scene in the game as well as its ending credits.

"1000 no Kotoba" was arranged by Takahito Eguchi and Noriko Matsueda. The CD contains the two songs in addition to their instrumental versions, covering a duration of 20:02. It was published by Rhythm Zone on March 5, 2003 with the catalog number RZCD-45080. [20]

Real Emotion/1000 Words was poorly received by critics, with Patrick Gann declaring himself to be "not too impressed". [20] It sold 283,000 copies. [21]

Kuon: Memories of Waves and Light – Music from Final Fantasy X-2

Kuon: Memories of Waves and Light – Music from Final Fantasy X-2 is an arranged single consisting of the songs from the game "Kuon: Memories of Waves and Light", "Besaid", and "Yuna's Ballad", composed and arranged by Noriko Matsueda and Takahito Eguchi. The songs feature live instruments, and are the only arranged tracks released from the Final Fantasy X-2 OST to date. The album was released by Avex on March 31, 2003. It covers a duration of 9:37 and has a catalog number of AVCD-30444. [22]

Gann was more receptive to the album than to "Real Emotion", feeling that the tracks were three of the best tracks from the soundtrack, and that the single was worth purchasing if only because it was the only release of arranged music from the game to date. However, he felt that for the length, the single was overpriced. [22] Chris of Square Enix Music Online also felt the single was overpriced, but additionally felt that the arrangements were "unremarkable musically" and that the album as a whole was "a cheap production." [23] Memories of Waves and Light reached #32 on the Oricon charts and stayed on the charts for eight weeks. [24]

Final Fantasy X-2 Vocal Collection

Final Fantasy X-2 Vocal Collection was a set of three singles, each consisting of two tracks sung by the voice actress for one of the main characters of the game and two instrumental tracks. The singles, Final Fantasy X-2 Vocal Collection- Paine, Final Fantasy X-2 Vocal Collection- Rikku, and Final Fantasy X-2 Vocal Collection- Yuna, were released by Avex on July 16, 2003. The songs were composed and arranged by Noriko Matsueda and Takahito Eguchi. Paine was voiced by Megumi Toyoguchi, Rikku by Marika Matsumoto, and Yuna by Mayuko Aoki. Each single was produced with an accompanying DVD which included a music video, an interview with the voice actress, and a montage of scenes from the game. Paine covered a duration of 16:19 and had a catalog number of AVCD-30485/B, [25] Rikku had a duration of 16:09 and a catalog number of AVCD-30483/B, [26] while Yuna covered a duration of 18:59 and had a catalog number of AVCD-30481/B. [27]

The Final Fantasy Vocal Collection singles received mixed reviews, with Patrick Gann praising Paine as "sophisticated" and applauding the instrumentation, while also approving of Yuna, terming it "peaceful" and the best of the three. [25] [27] However, he also derided Rikku as "cheesy" and disliked the lyrics of one of the two tracks from Paine. Additionally, he overall found the singles to be very overpriced for the small amount of material included. [26] Paine, Rikku and Yuna reached #30, #25, and #21 on the Oricon charts, respectively, and stayed on the charts for four, six, and seven weeks. [28] [29] [30]

Track listing

Legacy

Unlike the music from the main Final Fantasy series, no songs from Final Fantasy X-2 have been played at any of the numerous Final Fantasy concerts. Selections of music from the game have appeared on Japanese remix albums, called dojin music, and on English remixing websites. [31]

Related Research Articles

Masashi Hamauzu Japanese composer and pianist

Masashi Hamauzu is a Japanese composer, arranger, pianist, and lyricist. Hamauzu, who was employed at Square Enix from 1996 to 2010, was best known during that time for his work on the Final Fantasy and SaGa video game series. Born into a musical family in Germany, Hamauzu was raised in Japan. He became interested in music while in kindergarten, and took piano lessons from his parents.

Final Fantasy is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi and owned by Square Enix that includes video games, motion pictures, and other merchandise. The series began in 1987 as an eponymous role-playing video game developed by Square, spawning a video game series that became the central focus of the franchise. The music of the Final Fantasy series refers to the soundtracks of the Final Fantasy series of video games, as well as the surrounding medley of soundtrack, arranged, and compilation albums. The series' music ranges from very light background music to emotionally intense interweavings of character and situation leitmotifs.

Final Fantasy VII is a role-playing video game developed by Square and published by Sony Computer Entertainment as the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. Released in 1997, the game sparked the release of a collection of media centered on the game entitled the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. The music of the Final Fantasy VII series includes not only the soundtrack to the original game and its associated albums, but also the soundtracks and music albums released for the other titles in the collection. The first album produced was Final Fantasy VII Original Soundtrack, a compilation of all the music in the game. It was released as a soundtrack album on four CDs by DigiCube in 1997. A selection of tracks from the album was released in the single-disc Reunion Tracks by DigiCube the same year. Piano Collections Final Fantasy VII, an album featuring piano arrangements of pieces from the soundtrack, was released in 2003 by DigiCube, and Square Enix began reprinting all three albums in 2004. To date, these are the only released albums based on the original game's soundtrack, and were solely composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu; his role for the majority of subsequent albums has been filled by Masashi Hamauzu and Takeharu Ishimoto.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy VI was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. The Final Fantasy VI Original Sound Version, a compilation of all the music in the game, was released in Japan by NTT Publishing in 1994 and re-released by Square Enix in 2004. The album was released by Square Co./NTT Publishing in North America in 1994 under the name Kefka's Domain. Selected tracks from the official soundtrack were later released as part of the Music From FFV and FFVI Video Games album that was included with the release of Final Fantasy Anthology, and two EPs were produced containing character theme tracks entitled Final Fantasy VI Stars Vol. 1 and Vol. 2. A special orchestral arrangement of selected tracks from the game, arranged by Shiro Sagisu and Tsuneyoshi Saito, and performed by the Milan Symphony Orchestra, was released under the title Final Fantasy VI Grand Finale by NTT Publishing in 1994 and 2004, and a collection of piano arrangements, arranged by Shirou Satou and performed by Reiko Nomura, was released under the title Piano Collections Final Fantasy VI by Square/NTT Publishing in 1994 and by NTT Publishing in 2001. Additionally, a single containing unused and remixed tracks from the game was released as Final Fantasy VI Special Tracks by NTT Publishing in 1994.

Real Emotion / 1000 no Kotoba 2003 single by Kumi Koda

"Real Emotion/1000 no Kotoba" is a double A-side single by Japanese singer Koda Kumi. The single contains the songs "Real Emotion" and "1000 no Kotoba", which were featured in the game Final Fantasy X-2.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy XII was composed primarily by Hitoshi Sakimoto. Additional music was provided by Masaharu Iwata and Hayato Matsuo, who also orchestrated the opening and ending themes. Former regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu's only work for this game was "Kiss Me Good-Bye", the theme song sung by Angela Aki. The Final Fantasy XII Original Soundtrack was released on four Compact Discs in 2006 by Aniplex. A sampling of tracks from the soundtrack was released as an album entitled Selections from Final Fantasy XII Original Soundtrack, and was released in 2006 by Tofu Records. Additionally, a promotional digital album titled The Best of Final Fantasy XII was released on the Japanese localization of iTunes for download only in 2006. "Kiss Me Good-Bye" was released by Epic Records as a single in 2006, and Symphonic Poem "Hope", the complete music from the game's end credits, was released by Hats Unlimited in 2006. An abridged version of the latter piece, which originally accompanied a promotional video for the game, was included in the official soundtrack album. An album of piano arrangements, titled Piano Collections Final Fantasy XII, was released by Square Enix in 2012.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy V was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. The Final Fantasy V Original Sound Version, a compilation of almost all of the music in the game, was released by Square Co./NTT Publishing, and subsequently re-released by NTT Publishing after the game was brought to North America as part of the Final Fantasy Anthology. An arranged album entitled Final Fantasy V Dear Friends, containing a selection of musical tracks from the game arranged in multiple styles, including live and vocal versions, was released by Square/NTT Publishing and later re-released by NTT Publishing. Additionally, a collection of piano arrangements composed by Nobuo Uematsu, arranged by Shirou Satou and played by Toshiyuki Mori titled Piano Collections Final Fantasy V was released by Square/NTT Publishing, and re-released by NTT Publishing.

The music of the video games Final Fantasy and Final Fantasy II was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu, who would go on to be the exclusive composer for the next seven Final Fantasy games. Although they were composed separately, music from the two games has only been released together. All Sounds of Final Fantasy I•II, a compilation of almost all of the music in the games, was released by DataM/Polystar in 1989, and subsequently re-released by NTT Publishing in 1994. Symphonic Suite Final Fantasy, an arranged album of music from the two games by Katsuhisa Hattori and his son Takayuki Hattori was released by DataM in 1989, and re-released by NTT Publishing/Polystar in 1994. Final Fantasy & Final Fantasy II Original Soundtrack, another arranged album, this time by Nobuo Uematsu and Tsuyoshi Sekito, was released in 2002 by DigiCube and again in 2004 by Square Enix.

The music of the Final Fantasy Tactics series, composed of Final Fantasy Tactics, Final Fantasy Tactics Advance, Final Fantasy Tactics A2: Grimoire of the Rift, and Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions, was primarily composed by Hitoshi Sakimoto. He was assisted by Masaharu Iwata in composing the music for Final Fantasy Tactics. The Final Fantasy Tactics Original Soundtrack, a compilation of almost all of the music in the game, was released by DigiCube in 1997, and re-released by Square Enix in 2006. No separate soundtrack has been released for Final Fantasy Tactics: The War of the Lions. The soundtrack was well received by critics, who found it to be astounding and one of the best video game music soundtracks in existence at the time of its release.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy VIII was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. The Final Fantasy VIII Original Soundtrack, a compilation of all music in the game, was released on four Compact Discs by DigiCube in Japan, and by Square EA in North America. A special orchestral arrangement of selected tracks from the game—arranged by Shirō Hamaguchi—was released under the title Fithos Lusec Wecos Vinosec Final Fantasy VIII, and a collection of piano arrangements—performed by Shinko Ogata—was released under the title Piano Collections Final Fantasy VIII.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy III was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. Final Fantasy III Original Sound Version, a compilation of almost all of the music in the game, was released by Square Co./NTT Publishing in 1991, and subsequently re-released by NTT Publishing in 1994 and 2004. The soundtrack to the remake of Final Fantasy III for the Nintendo DS, Final Fantasy III Original Soundtrack was released by NTT Publishing in 2006, with revamped versions of the tracks and additional tracks. A vocal arrangement album entitled Final Fantasy III Yūkyū no Kaze Densetsu, or literally Final Fantasy III Legend of the Eternal Wind, contained a selection of musical tracks from the game. The tracks were performed by Nobuo Uematsu and Dido, a duo composed of Michiaki Kato and Shizuru Ohtaka. The album was released by Data M in 1990 and by Polystar in 1994.

The music of the MMORPG Final Fantasy XI was composed by Naoshi Mizuta along with regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu and Kumi Tanioka. The Final Fantasy XI Original Soundtrack, a compilation of almost all of the music in the game, was released by DigiCube in 2002, and subsequently re-released by Square Enix in 2004. Final Fantasy XI Rise of the Zilart Original Soundtrack was released by DigiCube in 2003 after the release of the Rise of the Zilart expansion for Final Fantasy XI, and re-released by Square Enix in 2004. Final Fantasy XI Chains of Promathia Original Soundtrack was produced by Square Enix in 2004 after the release of the Chains of Promathia expansion, and in 2005 Square Enix published Music from the Other Side of Vana'diel, a collection of arranged tracks from the game performed by The Star Onions, a group composed of Square Enix composers including Naoshi Mizuta, Kumi Tanioka and Hidenori Iwasaki. Final Fantasy XI Treasures of Aht Urhgan Original Soundtrack was released by Square Enix in 2006 for the Treasures of Aht Urhgan expansion.

<i>Racing Lagoon</i> video game

Racing Lagoon is a 1999 video game developed and published by Square. The game is unique in that it combines street racing with role-playing elements. The game's story follows a new member of a street racing team in 1999 Yokohama, Japan as he tries to learn about his forgotten past and a mysterious race that took place ten years prior to the game's opening.

Yuna is a fictional character from Square Enix's Final Fantasy series. She was first introduced as the female protagonist and one of the main playable characters of the 2001 role-playing video game Final Fantasy X, appearing as a summoner embarking on a journey to defeat the world-threatening monster Sin alongside her companions, including the male protagonist Tidus. Yuna reappears in Final Fantasy X-2, where she becomes the protagonist, searching for a way to find Tidus two years following his disappearance. Yuna has also been featured in other Square Enix games, notably Dissidia 012 Final Fantasy.

Front Mission is a series of tactical role-playing games produced by Square Enix. The music of the series includes the soundtracks to the main series, composed of Front Mission through Front Mission 5: Scars of the War, as well as the spin-off games, which include Front Mission Series: Gun Hazard, Front Mission Alternative, Front Mission: Online, Front Mission 2089 and its remake Front Mission 2089: Border of Madness, Front Mission 2089-II, and Front Mission Evolved. The soundtracks of the series' installments have been released in album form in Japan, with the exceptions of 2089, 2089-II, and Border of Madness, which reuse music from the other installments, and Evolved, which was published in 2010. The soundtrack to Front Mission was released in 1995 by NTT Publishing, which also published the soundtrack to Front Mission: Gun Hazard in 1996. DigiCube published soundtrack albums for Front Mission 2 and Alternative in 1997 and 3 in 1999. Square Enix published the albums for Front Mission 4 in 2004, and 5 and Online in 2006.

Final Fantasy XIII-2 is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square Enix in 2011 as the sequel to Final Fantasy XIII. The music of the game was composed by Masashi Hamauzu, Naoshi Mizuta, and Mitsuto Suzuki. It was intended to sound different from the music of previous Final Fantasy titles, featuring more musical styles and vocal pieces. Since the release of the game, Square Enix has published the 2011 four-disc soundtrack album, Final Fantasy XIII-2 Original Soundtrack, as well as an album of arrangements and alternate versions of tracks from the game, Final Fantasy XIII Original Soundtrack PLUS, in 2012. The theme song for the game, "Yakusoku no Basho", was released by singer Mai Fukui as a single in 2011, and the English version of the song, sung by Charice Pempengco and included in the non-Japanese versions of the game, was included on her 2012 album Infinity.

References

  1. 1 2 Dunham, Jeremy (2003). "Final Fantasy X-2 Developer Interview". IGN. Archived from the original on 2013-02-06. Retrieved 2006-07-16.
  2. "Miscellaneous Final Fantasy CDs". ffmusic.info. Archived from the original on 2012-07-16. Retrieved 2008-04-18.
  3. Gann, Patrick. "Kumi Koda - Come With Me". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2008-04-18.
  4. 1 2 3 Maas, Liz; Schweitzer, Ben. "Final Fantasy X-2 OST". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2008-04-03.
  5. "『FF XIII』サウンドトラックが初日TOP3入り" (in Japanese). Oricon. 2010-01-28. Archived from the original on 2013-02-06. Retrieved 2010-02-03.
  6. FINAL FANTASY X−2 Original Soundtrack (in Japanese). Oricon. Archived from the original on 2012-10-22. Retrieved 2010-06-24.
  7. Mattich, Ryan (2003). "Final Fantasy X-2 - Review". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2012-07-29. Retrieved 2006-07-31.
  8. 1 2 Bettenhausen, Shane (2004). "Final Fantasy X-2 PS2 Review". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on 2013-02-06. Retrieved 2007-08-26.
  9. 1 2 Raven, Red (2003). "Final Fantasy X-2 - Review". RPGamer. Archived from the original on 2012-06-23. Retrieved 2006-07-31.
  10. Dunham, Jeremy (2003). "Final Fantasy X-2 Review". IGN. Archived from the original on 2013-02-06. Retrieved 2006-07-31.
  11. "Final Fantasy X-2 PS2 Review". 1UP.com. 2004. Archived from the original on 2013-02-06. Retrieved 2007-08-26.
  12. Heit, Chris (2003-11-29). "Final Fantasy 10-2 Original Soundtrack". Soundtrack Central. Archived from the original on 2012-02-06. Retrieved 2008-04-16.
  13. 1 2 Gann, Patrick. "Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission OST". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2008-04-03.
  14. Chris. "Final Fantasy X-2 International + Last Mission Original Soundtrack". Square Enix Music Online. Archived from the original on 2012-02-08. Retrieved 2008-04-17.
  15. Greening, Chris. "Square Enix Album Sales". Square Enix Music Online. Archived from the original on 2018-06-18. Retrieved 2018-06-20.
  16. FINAL FANTASY X−2 INTERNATIONAL+LAST MISSION Original Soundtrack (in Japanese). Oricon. Archived from the original on 2012-10-22. Retrieved 2010-06-24.
  17. 1 2 Gann, Patrick. "Final Fantasy X-2 Piano Collection". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2008-04-14.
  18. Chris. "Final Fantasy X-2 Piano Collection Review by Chris". Square Enix Music Online. Archived from the original on 2012-02-08. Retrieved 2008-04-17.
  19. Jillian. "Final Fantasy X-2 Piano Collection: Review by Jillian". Square Enix Music Online. Archived from the original on 2012-02-08. Retrieved 2008-04-17.
  20. 1 2 Gann, Patrick. "Kumi Koda – Real Emotion/1000 Words". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2008-04-03.
  21. オリコンランキング情報サービス「you大樹」 [Oricon Ranking Information Service 'You Big Tree']. Oricon (in Japanese). Retrieved 2018-06-20.
  22. 1 2 Gann, Patrick. "Eternity ~Memories of Lightwaves~ Music from Final Fantasy X-2". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2008-04-11.
  23. Chris. "Eternity ~Memory of the Lightwaves~ Music from FFX-2: Review by Chris". Square Enix Music Online. Archived from the original on 2012-02-08. Retrieved 2008-04-17.
  24. 久遠〜光と波の記憶〜Music from FINAL FANTASY X−2 (in Japanese). Oricon. Archived from the original on 2012-10-22. Retrieved 2010-06-24.
  25. 1 2 Gann, Patrick. "Final Fantasy X-2 Vocal Collection - Paine". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2008-04-14.
  26. 1 2 Gann, Patrick. "Final Fantasy X-2 Vocal Collection - Rikku". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2008-04-14.
  27. 1 2 Gann, Patrick. "Final Fantasy X-2 Vocal Collection - Yuna". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2008-04-14.
  28. FINAL FANTASY X−2 Vocal Collection PAINE (in Japanese). Oricon. Archived from the original on 2012-10-22. Retrieved 2010-06-24.
  29. FINAL FANTASY X−2 VOCAL COLLECTION/RIKKU (in Japanese). Oricon. Archived from the original on 2012-10-22. Retrieved 2010-06-24.
  30. FINAL FANTASY X−2 VOCAL COLLECTION/YUNA (in Japanese). Oricon. Archived from the original on 2012-10-22. Retrieved 2010-06-24.
  31. "Game: Final Fantasy X-2 (2003, Square Enix, PS2)". OverClocked ReMix. Archived from the original on 2012-11-08. Retrieved 2008-04-14.