List of Final Fantasy media

Last updated

Final Fantasy is a series of role-playing video games developed and published by Square Enix (formerly Square). Its first game premiered in Japan in 1987, and Final Fantasy games have subsequently been localized for markets in North America, Europe and Australia, on nearly every video game console since its debut on the Nintendo Entertainment System. Final Fantasy is Square Enix's most successful franchise, having sold over 97 million units worldwide to date. [1] In addition to traditional role-playing games, the series includes tactical role-playing games, portable games, massively multiplayer online role-playing games, and games for mobile phones. Its popularity has placed it as the sixth-best-selling video game franchise, and the series has won multiple awards over the years. [2]

Final Fantasy is a Japanese science fantasy media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix. The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs/JRPGs). The first game in the series was released in 1987, with 14 other main-numbered entries being released since then. The franchise has since branched into other video game genres such as tactical role-playing, action role-playing, massively multiplayer online role-playing, racing, third-person shooter, fighting, and rhythm, as well as branching into other media, including CGI films, anime, manga, and novels.

A role-playing video game is a video game genre where the player controls the actions of a character immersed in some well-defined world. Many role-playing video games have origins in tabletop role-playing games and use much of the same terminology, settings and game mechanics. Other major similarities with pen-and-paper games include developed story-telling and narrative elements, player character development, complexity, as well as replayability and immersion. The electronic medium removes the necessity for a gamemaster and increases combat resolution speed. RPGs have evolved from simple text-based console-window games into visually rich 3D experiences.

Square Enix Japanese video game developer, publisher, and distribution company

Square Enix Holdings Co., Ltd. is a Japanese video game developer, publisher, and distribution company known for its Final Fantasy, Dragon Quest, and Kingdom Hearts role-playing video game franchises, among numerous others. Several of them have sold over 10 million copies worldwide, with the Final Fantasy franchise alone selling over 115 million. The Square Enix headquarters are in the Shinjuku Eastside Square Building in Shinjuku, Tokyo. The company employs over 4300 employees worldwide.

Contents

In addition to the 15 games released as part of the main (numbered) series and their many spin-offs and related titles, the Final Fantasy series has spawned many works in other media including anime, movies, novels and manga, and radio dramas. Final Fantasy: Unlimited , originally a stand-alone anime series, now has its own sub-franchise which includes video games. Many games, particularly the main series, have soundtrack album releases featuring their music in different arrangements. Square Enix has also consistently released companion books for its games which provide additional backstory and plot information, as well as detailed walkthroughs for the game. Since the announcement of Compilation of Final Fantasy VII , Square Enix has focused on "polymorphic content", expanding each game world with material on many video game platforms, as well as other forms of media. [3]

<i>Final Fantasy: Unlimited</i> anime

Final Fantasy: Unlimited is an anime television series based on Square Enix's popular Final Fantasy role-playing video game franchise.

Video game music is the soundtrack that accompanies video games. Early video game music was once limited to simple melodies of early sound synthesizer technology. These limitations inspired the style of music known as chiptunes, which combines simple melodic styles with more complex patterns or traditional music styles, and became the most popular sound of the first video games.

Arrangement musical composition in altered form

In music, an arrangement is a musical reconceptualization of a previously composed work. It may differ from the original work by means of reharmonization, melodic paraphrasing, orchestration, or development of the formal structure. Arranging differs from orchestration in that the latter process is limited to the assignment of notes to instruments for performance by an orchestra, concert band, or other musical ensemble. Arranging "involves adding compositional techniques, such as new thematic material for introductions, transitions, or modulations, and endings.. .. Arranging is the art of giving an existing melody musical variety".

Video games

Each game in the main series takes place in a different fictional universe, although beginning with Final Fantasy X-2 , additional video games set in the main series games' worlds have been released. [4] Compilation of Final Fantasy VII and Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy are cross-platform multimedia projects consisting of games, films, books, and other media centered on their respective main series game, Final Fantasy VII and Final Fantasy XIII . [3] [5] Final Fantasy Tactics , although originally envisioned as a spin-off game, became its own series as part of Ivalice Alliance , which counts Final Fantasy XII in its membership. [6]

Fictional universe self-consistent fictional setting with elements that may differ from the real world

A fictional universe is a self-consistent setting with events, and often other elements, that differ from the real world. It may also be called an imagined, constructed or fictional realm. Fictional universes may appear in novels, comics, films, television shows, video games, and other creative works.

<i>Final Fantasy X-2</i> 2003 video game

Final Fantasy X-2 is a role-playing video game developed and published by Square for the PlayStation 2, as the direct sequel to Final Fantasy X. The game's story follows the character Yuna from Final Fantasy X as she seeks to resolve political conflicts in the fictional world of Spira before they lead to war and to search for her lost love Tidus from Final Fantasy X.

<i>Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy</i> video game series

Fabula Nova Crystallis Final Fantasy is a series of games within the Final Fantasy video game franchise. It was primarily developed by series creator and developer Square Enix, which also acted as publisher for all titles. While featuring various worlds and different characters, each Fabula Nova Crystallis game is ultimately based on and expands upon a common mythos focusing on important crystals tied to deities. The level of connection to the mythos varies between each title. The series title translates from Latin as 'The New Tale of the Crystal'. Each development team was given the freedom to adapt the mythos to fit the context of a game's story.

A large number of spin-off video games have also been made for the Final Fantasy series. These spin-off games vary in their relation to the main series; the first, The Final Fantasy Legend games, were marketed as related in North America but were considered to be the first three games of the SaGa series in their native Japan, and later SaGa games released outside Japan bear no Final Fantasy branding. [7] Dissidia Final Fantasy , on the other hand, is a fighting game using characters from the main series exclusively. [8] Overall, more than 30 games have been released as spin-offs of the main Final Fantasy series, many within their own sub-series.

<i>The Final Fantasy Legend</i> 1989 video game

The Final Fantasy Legend, known in Japan as Makai Toushi Sa·Ga, is a video game released for the Game Boy in December 1989 by Square Co. It is the first game in the SaGa series and the first role-playing video game for the system. Square translated the game into English for worldwide release and renamed it, linking it with the Final Fantasy series to improve marketing. Sunsoft re-released it in North America during 1998; Square followed with a remake released for the WonderSwan Color and mobile phones in 2002 and 2007 respectively.

<i>Dissidia Final Fantasy</i> video game

Dissidia Final Fantasy is a fighting game with action RPG elements developed and published by Square Enix for the PlayStation Portable as part of the campaign for the Final Fantasy series' 20th anniversary. It was released in Japan on December 18, 2008, in North America on August 25, 2009, in Australia on September 3, 2009 and in Europe on September 4, 2009. It was then re-released as an international version in Japan, based on the North American port, as Dissidia Final Fantasy: Universal Tuning, on November 1, 2009.

TitleOriginal release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy December 18, 1987 [9] July 12, 1990 [10] March 14, 2003 [11] (PlayStation)
Notes:
Final Fantasy II December 17, 1988 [9] April 8, 2003 [11] (PlayStation)March 14, 2003 [11] (PlayStation)
Notes:
Final Fantasy III April 27, 1990 [9] November 14, 2006 [26] (Nintendo DS)May 4, 2007 [26] (Nintendo DS)
Notes:
  • Released on Family Computer
  • Also available on Virtual Console [18]
  • Full 3D remake for Nintendo DS, [27] iOS and PC.
Final Fantasy IV July 19, 1991 [28] November 23, 1991 [29] February 27, 2002 [30] (PlayStation)
Notes:
  • Released on Super Famicom, first released in North America as "Final Fantasy II" on Super NES [31]
  • Also available on PlayStation, [32] WonderSwan Color, [33] Game Boy Advance, [34] mobile phone, [35] and Virtual Console [18]
  • Full 3D remake for Nintendo DS [36]
Final Fantasy V December 6, 1992 [28] October 5, 1999 [37] (PlayStation)February 27, 2002 [30] (PlayStation)
Notes:
  • Released on Super Famicom
  • Also available on PlayStation [38] Game Boy Advance, [39] Virtual Console, [18] and PlayStation Network [40]
Final Fantasy VI April 2, 1994 [28] October 11, 1994 [41] March 1, 2002 [42] (PlayStation)
Notes:
  • Released on Super Famicom, first released in North America as "Final Fantasy III" on Super NES [43]
  • Also available on PlayStation [42] Game Boy Advance, [44] and Virtual Console [18]
Final Fantasy VII January 31, 1997 [45] September 7, 1997 [46] November 17, 1997 [47]
Notes:
Final Fantasy VIII February 11, 1999 [45] September 9, 1999 [51] October 27, 1999 [52]
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation
  • Also available on Microsoft Windows personal computer [53] and PlayStation Network [54]
Final Fantasy IX July 7, 2000 [55] November 13, 2000 [55] February 16, 2001 [55]
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation
  • Also available on Microsoft Windows personal computer [56] and PlayStation Network [57]
Final Fantasy X July 19, 2001 [58] December 17, 2001 [58] May 24, 2002 [58]
Notes:
Final Fantasy XI May 16, 2002 [60] October 28, 2003 [61] (Microsoft Windows)September 17, 2004 [62] (Microsoft Windows)
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation 2, Microsoft Windows personal computer, and Xbox 360
  • Five expansion packs and six "add-on scenarios" released in the following years [63]
Final Fantasy XII March 16, 2006 [64] October 31, 2006 [65] February 23, 2007 [66]
Notes:
  • Released on PlayStation 2
  • International version released in Japan [67]
Final Fantasy XIII December 17, 2009 [68] March 9, 2010 [69] March 9, 2010 [69]
Notes:
Final Fantasy XIV September 21, 2010 [70] September 21, 2010 [71] [72] September 21, 2010 [73]
Notes:
  • Released on Microsoft Windows.
  • Completely revamped version released in 2013 as Final Fantasy XIV: A Realm Reborn for Windows, PlayStation 3 and in 2014 for PlayStation 4
Final Fantasy XV November 29, 2016November 29, 2016November 29, 2016
Notes:

Film and television

Square's initial forays into film and television were critical and commercial failures. Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals was poorly received and the box office failure of Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within lead to the merger between Square and Enix. [74] [75] [76] The series did not have success in film until Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children , which ultimately won several awards for "best anime feature" and sold over 2.4 million copies within a year. [77] [78] [79]

<i>Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals</i> 1994 original video animation

Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals is an anime OVA based on the Final Fantasy series of role-playing video games. It was released in Japan in 1994 and distributed by Urban Vision in 1997 in North America on VHS. Urban Vision have since lost the distribution license and to date the series hasn't been released in any other format, such as DVD, following its initial video release.

<i>Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within</i> 2001 computer-animated film directed by Hironobu Sakaguchi

Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within is a 2001 American computer-animated science fiction film directed by Hironobu Sakaguchi, creator of the Final Fantasy series of role-playing video games. It was the first photorealistic computer-animated feature film and was the most expensive video game-inspired film until the release of Prince of Persia in 2010. It features the voices of Ming-Na Wen, Alec Baldwin, Donald Sutherland, James Woods, Ving Rhames, Peri Gilpin and Steve Buscemi.

Enix Japanese video game publisher

Enix Corporation was a Japanese video game publisher that produced video games, anime and manga. Enix is known for publishing the Dragon Quest series of role-playing video games.

TitleOriginal release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy: Legend of the Crystals March 21, 1994 [80] November 24, 1998 [81] none
Notes:
Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within September 15, 2001 [82] July 11, 2001 [83] August 3, 2001 [83]
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited October 2, 2001 [84] October 28, 2003 [85] March 15, 2004 [86]
Notes:
Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children September 14, 2005 [87] April 25, 2006 [87] April 24, 2006 [87]
Notes:
Brotherhood: Final Fantasy XV March 30, 2016March 30, 2016March 30, 2016
Notes:
  • Original 5 episode animated television series by A-1 Pictures, that was released for free on the internet.
  • Focuses on the four main characters of Final Fantasy XV - Prince Noctis, Gladiolus, Prompto and Ignis - and establishes their back story and how the latter three each met Prince Noctis.
  • Blu-Ray version with a 6th bonus episode, focusing on Lunafreya, was included with the Ultimate Collector's Edition of Final Fantasy XV and with the Limited Edition of Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV .
Kingsglaive: Final Fantasy XV July 2016August 17, 2016October, 2016
Notes:
  • Kingsglaive is based on the setting and story of the 2016 video game Final Fantasy XV, which is thematically connected to the Fabula Nova Crystallis subseries.
  • A prequel that focuses on Noctis' father and the Niflheim Invasion, leading directly into the events of the game.

Radio drama

Despite its decline in the United States, radio drama has remained popular in Japan. The series features a small number of radio drama releases.

Radio drama dramatized, purely acoustic performance

Radio drama is a dramatised, purely acoustic performance. With no visual component, radio drama depends on dialogue, music and sound effects to help the listener imagine the characters and story: "It is auditory in the physical dimension but equally powerful as a visual force in the psychological dimension."

TitleOriginal release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy Tactics AdvanceFebruary 26, 2003 [90] nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited Before 2003nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited After 2 2003nonenone
Notes:
  • Radio drama that continues the story of the anime [92]

Soundtracks

The primary composer of music for the main series was Nobuo Uematsu, who single-handedly composed the soundtracks for the first nine games, as well as directed the production of many of the albums. Music for the spin-off series and main series games beginning with Final Fantasy X was created by a variety of composers including Masashi Hamauzu, Naoshi Mizuta, Hitoshi Sakimoto, and Kumi Tanioka, as well as many others. [2] In addition to the original soundtracks, listed below, many games have inspired orchestral, vocal, or piano arrangement albums, as well as compilation albums featuring music from several Final Fantasy games.

TitleOriginal release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

All Sounds of Final Fantasy I & IIDecember 21, 1988 [93] nonenone
Notes:
  • One CD (62:33) with 49 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DataM/Polystar
Final Fantasy III Original Sound VersionJuly 15, 1991 [94] nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy IV Original Sound VersionJune 14, 1991 [95] August 21, 2001 [96] none
Notes:
  • One CD (58:23) with 44 tracks
  • Released in Japan by Square Co. and NTT Publishing
Final Fantasy V Original Sound VersionDecember 7, 1992 [97] nonenone
Notes:
  • Two CDs (2:08:30) with 67 tracks
  • Released in Japan by Square Co. and NTT Publishing
Final Fantasy VI Original Sound VersionMarch 25, 1994 [98] July 1, 1994 [99] none
Notes:
  • Three CDs (3:07:21) with 61 tracks
  • Released in Japan by NTT Publishing
Final Fantasy VII Original SoundtrackFebruary 10, 1997 [100] nonenone
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:39:53) with 85 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DigiCube
Final Fantasy VIII Original SoundtrackMarch 1, 1999 [101] January 2000 [102] none
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:09:30) with 74 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DigiCube
Final Fantasy IX Original SoundtrackAugust 30, 2000 [103] nonenone
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:46:31) with 110 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DigiCube
Final Fantasy X Original SoundtrackAugust 1, 2001 [104] nonenone
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:32:26) with 91 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DigiCube
Final Fantasy XI Original SoundtrackJune 5, 2002 [105] nonenone
Notes:
  • Two CDs (1:51:57) with 51 tracks
  • Released in Japan by DigiCube
Final Fantasy XII Original SoundtrackMay 31, 2006 [106] January 31, 2012none
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:54:34) with 100 tracks
  • Released in Japan by Aniplex
Final Fantasy XIII Original SoundtrackJanuary 27, 2010 [107] nonenone
Notes:
  • Four CDs (4:04:06) with 85 tracks
  • Released in Japan by Square Enix

Companion books

Starting with Final Fantasy III, Square began publishing guide books for its games which traditionally include additional content such as developer interviews and expanded plot and setting information. Studio BentStuff wrote the first Ultimania book for Final Fantasy VIII in 1999, though the company had been contracted to write Final Fantasy VII True Script Dissection for the previous game. Since then, Ultimania books have been written for every major Final Fantasy title, including Battle Ultimania, Scenario Ultimania, and Ultimania Omega editions for some games. [108] Square experimented with online content delivery with Final Fantasy IX Online Ultimania, but the move was criticized for forcing customers to buy a print guide while releasing most of the information online. [109] Another online Ultimania was planned for Final Fantasy XI, but it was dropped during development. [110] Square Enix has produced expanded editions to some books, such as Final Fantasy VII 10th Anniversary Ultimania Revised Edition. [111] In addition to the Ultimania series, Square Enix also publishes an Official Complete Guide series of guide books. [112]

A set of three artbooks have also been produced under the title The Sky: The Art of Final Fantasy. The set was first released in Japan in May 2002 by Digicube, then released in North America as a boxed set a decade later on October 17, 2012 by Dark Horse Books with additional postcards, prints, and booklets. A third edition was released in a slipcase by Dark Horse Books on July 17, 2013 without the additional pieces. Each book features concept art by Yoshitaka Amano, with the first book covering Final Fantasy I through III, the second IV through VI, and the third VII through X. [113] [114] [115]

Novels and manga

Many Final Fantasy games have been adapted as novels and manga series. With the advent of the Internet, web novels and digital publishing have also become common. These stories act as companion pieces, offering an interpretation of the game's events or expanding the plot of the games by depicting additional scenarios.

TitleOriginal release date

Japan

North America

PAL region

Final Fantasy II Muma no MeikyūApril 1989 [116] nonenone
Notes:
  • Novelization of Final Fantasy II written by Kenji Terada
  • Roughly translates to "Labyrinth of Nightmare"
  • (JP) ISBN   978-4-04-410604-1
Yūkyū no Kaze Densetsu Final Fantasy IIISeptember 1992 [117] nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy: The Spirits WithinnoneJune 26, 2001 [118] none
Notes:
Sō no KizunaMarch 2002 [119] nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy: Unlimited AfterMay 2002 [120] nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy XI ~The Out of Orders~April 19, 2003 [121] nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy XIMay 2003 [122] nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles ~Hatenaki Sora no Mukō ni~January 10, 2004 [125] nonenone
Notes:
On the Way to a Smile September 14, 2005 [126] February 20, 2007 [88] February 20, 2007 [88]
Notes:
  • Collection of two novellas, "Case of Denzel" and "Case of Tifa", set in Final Fantasy VII's continuity, written by Kazushige Nojima and published in the book Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children Prologue
  • Released in English in the Advent Children Limited Edition Collector's Set along with "Case of Barret" written specifically for that release
  • Four more stories, "Case of Yuffie", "Case of Red XIII", "Case of Shinra", and "Case of the Lifestream", and the previous three were published in a single anthology in Japan by Square Enix, on April 16, 2009 [127]
  • (JP) ISBN   978-4-7575-2462-0
Final Fantasy XIIDecember 22, 2006 [128] nonenone
Notes:
Adventure LognoneMarch 20, 2007 [129] none
Notes:
Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles Ring of Fates 4 Komaansoroji KomikkuMarch 1, 2008 [130] nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy IVDecember 25, 2008 [131] nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy IV: The AfterMarch 26, 2009 [132] nonenone
Notes:
Final Fantasy XIII Episode Zero: PromiseSeptember 28, 2009 [133] nonenone
Notes:
  • Series of web novels written by Jun Eishima and first published on the official Japanese Final Fantasy XIII website, depicting the thirteen days leading up to the events of the game
  • Later published in a single anthology by Square Enix on December 24, 2009 [134]
  • (JP) ISBN   978-4-7575-2770-6
Final Fantasy: Memory of HeroesOctober 31, 2012 [135] nonenone
Notes:
  • Novel containing three short stories, each covering the story of Final Fantasy I, II, or III, written by Umemura Takashi [135]
  • (JP) ISBN   978-4-7575-3775-0

See also

Related Research Articles

<i>Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles</i> 2003 video game

Final Fantasy Crystal Chronicles is an action role-playing game developed by The Game Designers Studio and published for the GameCube by Nintendo in 2003 in Japan; and 2004 in North America, Europe and Australia. A remastered version for Nintendo Switch and PlayStation 4 will be released in 2019. A spin-off of the Final Fantasy series, Crystal Chronicles was the first title released for a Nintendo console since Final Fantasy VI in 1994.

Tifa Lockhart character in Final Fantasy VII

Tifa Lockhart is a fictional character in Square's role-playing video game Final Fantasy VII. Created and designed by Tetsuya Nomura, she has since appeared in the fighting game Ehrgeiz and made cameo appearances in several other titles, as well as the CGI film sequel to Final Fantasy VII, Advent Children and related games and media in the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII series.

<i>Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII</i> video game (2006)

Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII is an action role-playing third-person shooter developed and published by Square Enix in 2006 for the PlayStation 2. It is part of the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII metaseries, a multimedia collection set within the universe of the popular 1997 video game Final Fantasy VII. The game is set three years after the events of the original game, and focuses on one of the game's playable characters, Vincent Valentine. In the story, Vincent is targeted by Deepground, a mysterious organization that plans to awaken a creature known as Omega, with the ability to destroy the Planet.

<i>Compilation of Final Fantasy VII</i> media franchise

The Compilation of Final Fantasy VII is a metaseries produced by Square Enix. A subseries stemming from the main Final Fantasy series, it is a collection of video games, animated features and short stories based in the world and continuity of Final Fantasy VII. Officially announced in 2003 with the reveal of Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children, the series' core products are three video games and one movie release. Alongside these are tie-in products and spin-offs including books, mobile games and an original video animation. Advent Children and the mobile title Before Crisis: Final Fantasy VII are a sequel and prequel to VII, respectively focusing on Cloud Strife, the original game's main protagonist, and covert operatives known as the Turks. Crisis Core: Final Fantasy VII follows the story of Zack Fair, an important major character in VII, while Dirge of Cerberus: Final Fantasy VII, which acts as a sequel to Advent Children, follows Vincent Valentine, one of the original's optional characters.

Final Fantasy VII is a role-playing video game developed by Square and published by Sony Computer Entertainment as the seventh installment in the Final Fantasy series. Released in 1997, the game sparked the release of a collection of media centered on the game entitled the Compilation of Final Fantasy VII. The music of the Final Fantasy VII series includes not only the soundtrack to the original game and its associated albums, but also the soundtracks and music albums released for the other titles in the collection. The first album produced was Final Fantasy VII Original Soundtrack, a compilation of all the music in the game. It was released as a soundtrack album on four CDs by DigiCube in 1997. A selection of tracks from the album was released in the single-disc Reunion Tracks by DigiCube the same year. Piano Collections Final Fantasy VII, an album featuring piano arrangements of pieces from the soundtrack, was released in 2003 by DigiCube, and Square Enix began reprinting all three albums in 2004. To date, these are the only released albums based on the original game's soundtrack, and were solely composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu; his role for the majority of subsequent albums has been filled by Masashi Hamauzu and Takeharu Ishimoto.

Yoshinori Kitase Japanese video game designer

Yoshinori Kitase is a Japanese game director and producer working for Square Enix. He is known as the director of Final Fantasy VI, Chrono Trigger, Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy VIII and Final Fantasy X, and the producer of the Final Fantasy X and Final Fantasy XIII series. Kitase is an Executive Officer at Square Enix, the Head of Square Enix's Business Division 1 and part of the Final Fantasy Committee that is tasked with keeping the franchise's releases and content consistent.

Motomu Toriyama video game designer

Motomu Toriyama is a Japanese game director and scenario writer who has been working for Square Enix since 1994. He initially worked on cutscenes in Bahamut Lagoon and Final Fantasy VII. Toriyama started directing with Final Fantasy X-2 and has continued doing so with large-scale projects such as Final Fantasy XIII and its sequels Final Fantasy XIII-2 and Lightning Returns: Final Fantasy XIII. Since 2003, he has been directing his own team of scenario writers at the company. He is currently directing Mobius Final Fantasy and is a member of Square Enix's Business Division 1, and part of the Final Fantasy Committee that is tasked with keeping the franchise's releases and content consistent.

The music of the video game Final Fantasy VIII was composed by regular series composer Nobuo Uematsu. The Final Fantasy VIII Original Soundtrack, a compilation of all music in the game, was released on four Compact Discs by DigiCube in Japan, and by Square EA in North America. A special orchestral arrangement of selected tracks from the game—arranged by Shirō Hamaguchi—was released under the title Fithos Lusec Wecos Vinosec Final Fantasy VIII, and a collection of piano arrangements—performed by Shinko Ogata—was released under the title Piano Collections Final Fantasy VIII.

Daisuke Watanabe is a Japanese video game writer employed by Square Enix. He is mostly known for his work on the role-playing video game series Final Fantasy and the action RPG series Kingdom Hearts.

Final Fantasy is a media franchise created by Hironobu Sakaguchi, and developed and owned by Square Enix. The franchise centers on a series of fantasy and science fantasy role-playing video games (RPGs). The eponymous first game in the series, published in 1987, was conceived by Sakaguchi as his last-ditch effort in the game industry; the title was a success and spawned sequels. While most entries in the series are separate from each other, they have recurring elements carrying over between entries: these include plot themes and motifs, gameplay mechanics such as the Active Time Battle (ATB) system, and signature character designs from the likes of Yoshitaka Amano and Tetsuya Nomura.

References

  1. "Press Release: Square Enix Brings an Unrivaled Lineup of Franchises to E3 2010" (Press release). Square Enix. 2010-06-09. Archived from the original on 2010-06-13. Retrieved 2010-06-10.
  2. 1 2 "Final Frontiers". Edge (177). Future Publishing. July 2007. pp. 72–79. Archived from the original on 2012-05-09. Retrieved 2007-10-07.
  3. 1 2 Kohler, Chris (2004-09-24). "More Compilation of Final Fantasy VII details". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2012-04-16. Retrieved 2006-08-10.
  4. Shoemaker, Brad (2003-11-18). "Final Fantasy X-2 for PlayStation 2 Review". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2003-12-04. Retrieved 2010-06-25.
  5. Shoemaker, Brad (2006-05-06). "E3 06: Square Enix announces trio of Final Fantasy XIII games". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2006-11-18. Retrieved 2010-10-04.
  6. Mielke, James (2007-05-15). "Interviews on Final Fantasy's Nintendo DS, Wii Assault". 1UP.com. Archived from the original on 2012-08-13. Retrieved 2010-06-25.
  7. Kennedy, Sam; Steinman, Gary (August 2001). "Milking The Final Fantasy Franchise". Official U.S. PlayStation Magazine (44): 99.
  8. "Dissidia Final Fantasy (PSP)". GameSpy. Archived from the original on 2009-07-02. Retrieved 2010-01-27.
  9. 1 2 3 "Square Enix Japan: Games 1990–1985" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2008-05-09. Retrieved 2008-01-03.
  10. "Final Fantasy for NES: Summary". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2007-06-30. Retrieved 2007-08-16.
  11. 1 2 3 "Final Fantasy Origins for PS". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-04-02. Retrieved 2010-06-24.
  12. "Final Fantasy for MSX". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-07-31. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  13. "Final Fantasy for WSC". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-04-02. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  14. "Final Fantasy for PlayStation". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2010-01-25. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  15. 1 2 "Final Fantasy I & II: Dawn of Souls for Game Boy Advance". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-04-02. Retrieved 2010-01-27.
  16. Tsukioka, Aki (2004-02-24). "Square Enix to Launch DoCoMo Sites for World-Famous Game Titles". Japan Corporate News Network. Archived from the original on 2004-04-21. Retrieved 2008-10-16.
  17. "Final Fantasy Anniversary Edition for PSP". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2011-11-26. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  18. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Kohler, Chris (2009-03-25). "Final Fantasy Coming to Virtual Console and WiiWare". Wired . Archived from the original on 2010-07-30. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
  19. "ファイナルファンタジー". PlayStation Official Site (Japan). Archived from the original on 2011-08-16. Retrieved 2011-04-04.
  20. 1 2 Nosowitz, Dan (2010-01-21). "Holy Crap, Final Fantasy Is Coming to iPhone". Gizmodo. Archived from the original on 2010-04-10. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
  21. "Final Fantasy II for WSC". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-10-04. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  22. "Final Fantasy II for PlayStation". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-06-02. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  23. "Final Fantasy II for Cell Phones". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2010-02-21. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  24. "Final Fantasy II Anniversary Edition for PSP". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-05-25. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  25. "ファイナルファンタジーII". PlayStation Official Site (Japan). Archived from the original on 2011-10-01. Retrieved 2011-04-04.
  26. 1 2 "Final Fantasy III for DS". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-01-24. Retrieved 2010-03-26.
  27. "Final Fantasy III for DS". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2010-03-03. Retrieved 2010-03-26.
  28. 1 2 3 "Square Enix Japan: Games 1995–1991" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2008-05-14. Retrieved 2008-01-03.
  29. "Final Fantasy II for SNES: Summary". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2007-10-14. Retrieved 2008-01-03.
  30. 1 2 "Final Fantasy Anthology". RPGamer. Archived from the original on 2010-06-27. Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  31. "Final Fantasy II for SNES". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2007-10-14. Retrieved 2008-01-03.
  32. "Final Fantasy IV for PlayStation". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2010-03-09. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  33. "Final Fantasy IV for WSC". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2010-04-25. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  34. "Final Fantasy IV Advance for Game Boy Advance". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2006-02-18. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  35. "Final Fantasy IV Advance for cell phones". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2010-08-12. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
  36. "Final Fantasy IV". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-05-05. Retrieved 2010-07-25.
  37. "Final Fantasy Anthology". IGN. Archived from the original on 2010-12-15. Retrieved 2010-01-27.
  38. "Final Fantasy V for PlayStation". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2010-03-10. Retrieved 2010-03-26.
  39. "Final Fantasy V for Game Boy Advance". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2008-12-05. Retrieved 2010-03-26.
  40. "Final Fantasy V coming to PSN". Computer and Video Games. Archived from the original on 2011-04-06. Retrieved 2011-04-04.
  41. "1995–1991| Square Enix". Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2008-11-20. Retrieved 2009-08-26.
  42. 1 2 "Final Fantasy VI for PlayStation". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2010-11-09. Retrieved 2010-03-26.
  43. "Final Fantasy III for SNES". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2011-07-19. Retrieved 2010-03-26.
  44. "Final Fantasy VI for Game Boy Advance". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2011-08-16. Retrieved 2010-03-26.
  45. 1 2 "Square Enix Japan: Games 2000–1996" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2012-03-05. Retrieved 2008-01-03.
  46. Smith, Molly; Kramer, Chris (1997-02-09). "Sony Computer Entertainment America Unveils Release Date For Most Anticipated Video Game Title of 1997". Business Wire . Retrieved 2007-03-03.
  47. "Final Fantasy VII for PlayStation". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2011-07-26. Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  48. "Final Fantasy VII for PC". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2010-03-17. Retrieved 2010-03-26.
  49. "Final Fantasy VII". IGN. Archived from the original on 2010-04-16. Retrieved 2010-04-09.
  50. "Final Fantasy VII for PlayStation". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2011-07-26. Retrieved 2010-03-30.
  51. "Square Enix North America: Games 2000–1996". Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2012-09-25. Retrieved 2008-01-03.
  52. "Final Fantasy VIII for PlayStation". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-04-15. Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  53. "Final Fantasy VIII for PC". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2011-07-13. Retrieved 2010-03-26.
  54. "Final Fantasy VIII". IGN. Archived from the original on 2010-04-12. Retrieved 2010-04-09.
  55. 1 2 3 "Final Fantasy IX for PlayStation". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2011-04-30. Retrieved 2010-01-27.
  56. "Final Fantasy IX for PC". Steam. Archived from the original on 2016-04-08. Retrieved 2017-01-26.
  57. "Final Fantasy IX". Playstation. Archived from the original on 2017-09-04. Retrieved 2017-01-26.
  58. 1 2 3 "Final Fantasy X for PlayStation 2". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2011-07-11. Retrieved 2010-01-27.
  59. Dunham, Jeremy (2003-11-24). "Final Fantasy X-2 Developer Interview". IGN. Archived from the original on 2012-08-10. Retrieved 2008-11-24.
  60. "Square Enix Japan: Games 2004–2001" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2008-05-14. Retrieved 2008-01-03.
  61. "Square Enix North America: Games 2004–2001". Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2012-09-24. Retrieved 2008-01-03.
  62. "Final Fantasy XI Online (European)". Allgame. Archived from the original on 2014-11-15. Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  63. "Square Enix Announces Release Date of Final Fantasy XI Ultimate Collection". Square Enix. 2009-10-13. Archived from the original on 2009-10-16. Retrieved 2010-01-27.
  64. "Square Enix Japan: Games 2007–2006" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2008-05-14. Retrieved 2008-01-03.
  65. "Final Fantasy XII in stores October 31, 2006". Square Enix. 2006-06-28. Archived from the original on August 23, 2006. Retrieved 2006-08-13.
  66. "Final Fantasy XII dated". Eurogamer. 2007-01-12. Archived from the original on 2009-02-01. Retrieved 2007-01-19.
  67. "Final Fantasy XII International Zodiac Job System for PlayStation 2". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-02-13. Retrieved 2010-03-29.
  68. Robinson, Andy (2009-09-08). "Final Fantasy XIII out Dec 17 in Japan". Computer and Video Games . Archived from the original on 2010-12-30. Retrieved 2009-09-08.
  69. 1 2 Marfuggi, Antonio (November 13, 2009). "Final Fantasy XIII – The Time Has Come". Sony Computer Entertainment. Archived from the original on May 7, 2011. Retrieved 2009-11-10.
  70. SQUARE ENIX CO.; LTD. "ファイナルファンタジーXIV 公式プロモーションサイト". FINAL FANTASY XIV. Archived from the original on 2010-11-15.
  71. Bailey, Kat (2010-06-30). "Final Fantasy XIV PC Release Date Confirmed, PS3 Version Delayed". 1up.com. Archived from the original on 2013-01-16. Retrieved 2011-12-06.
  72. "Results Briefing Session - The Fiscal Year Ended 31 March 2010" (PDF). Square Enix Holdings. Archived (PDF) from the original on 29 September 2011. Retrieved 2010-05-18.
  73. "Final Fantasy XIV dated". MCV. 2010-06-30. Archived from the original on 2010-07-03. Retrieved 2010-06-30.
  74. Duffy, James (2006-08-02). "Movies that were Box-office Bombs". Boston.com. Archived from the original on 2012-10-25. Retrieved 2010-01-02.
  75. Isler, Ramsey (2007-12-17). "Gaming to Anime: Final Fantasy VI". IGN. Archived from the original on 2011-08-03. Retrieved 2009-07-03.
  76. Briscoe, David (2002-02-04). "'Final Fantasy' flop causes studio to fold". Chicago Sun-Times.
  77. "Festival Official Presentation". Sitges Film Festival. 2005-04-10. Archived from the original on 2010-01-15. Retrieved 2010-07-26.
  78. Carle, Chris (2007-02-24). "NYCC 07: American Anime Award Winners Revealed". IGN. Archived from the original on 2010-03-16. Retrieved 2010-07-26.
  79. "世界中で高い評価!『FFVII AC』累計出荷数は240万枚" (in Japanese). Gpara. 2006-06-19. Archived from the original on 2013-06-01. Retrieved 2010-07-26.
  80. NTT Publishing Information Paper (in Japanese). NTT Publishing. 1994. Archived from the original on 2013-11-11.
  81. Legend of Crystals: Final Fantasy 1 (Dub) (VHS) (VHS video tape). Square Enix.
  82. "Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within". IMDb. Archived from the original on 2009-05-05. Retrieved 2010-12-27.
  83. 1 2 "Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within". Box Office Mojo. Archived from the original on 2010-03-29. Retrieved 2010-12-27.
  84. "Final Fantasy Unlimited". TV.com. Archived from the original on 2010-08-01. Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  85. "Final Fantasy – Unlimited (Phase 1) (2004)". Amazon.com . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  86. "Final Fantasy Unlimited Volume 1 (DVD)". Amazon.com . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  87. 1 2 3 "Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children for PSP". GameSpot. Archived from the original on 2009-02-12. Retrieved 2010-01-27.
  88. 1 2 3 Carle, Chris (2007-02-16). "Double Dip Digest: Final Fantasy VII: Advent Children (Limited Edition Collector's Set)". IGN. Archived from the original on 2012-07-07. Retrieved 2010-06-24.
  89. "Advent Children Complete North American Release June". Square Enix. 2009-05-29. Archived from the original on 2012-02-21. Retrieved 2010-01-28.
  90. "Final Fantasy Tactics Advance Radio Edition – Complete Version: Vol. 1". Square Enix Music Online. 2006. Archived from the original on 2007-12-23. Retrieved 2007-10-22.
  91. "ファイナルファンタジー:アンリミテッド Before アウラ いのちつぐもの" (in Japanese). Seesaa. 2009-09-29. Archived from the original on 2009-10-12. Retrieved 2010-07-20.
  92. "FF:U ファイナルファンタジー:アンリミテッドアフターツー -リサ たちきられたくさり-" (in Japanese). Rakuten. Archived from the original on 2011-07-23. Retrieved 2010-07-20.
  93. "All Sounds of Final Fantasy I & II". MusicBrainz . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  94. "Final Fantasy III: Original Sound Version". MusicBrainz . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  95. "Final Fantasy IV: Original Sound Version". MusicBrainz . Retrieved 2010-06-24.
  96. "Final Fantasy IV Official Soundtrack: Music From Final Fantasy Chronicles". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2010-12-01. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
  97. "Final Fantasy V: Original Sound Version". MusicBrainz . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  98. "Final Fantasy VI: Original Sound Version". MusicBrainz. Archived from the original on 2007-09-29. Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  99. "Kefka's Domain: The complete soundtrack from the Final Fantasy III video game". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-08-17. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
  100. "Final Fantasy VII: Original Soundtrack". MusicBrainz . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  101. "Final Fantasy VIII: Original Soundtrack". MusicBrainz. Archived from the original on 2007-10-14. Retrieved 2010-06-24.
  102. "Final Fantasy VIII Music Collection". RPGFan. Archived from the original on 2013-08-17. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
  103. "Final Fantasy IX: Original Soundtrack". MusicBrainz . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  104. "Final Fantasy X: Original Soundtrack". MusicBrainz . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  105. "Final Fantasy XI: Original Soundtrack". MusicBrainz . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  106. "Final Fantasy XII: Original Soundtrack". MusicBrainz . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  107. "Final Fantasy XIII: Original Soundtrack". MusicBrainz . Retrieved 2010-07-06.
  108. "Final Fantasy X Ultimania Guide". IGN. 2001-08-20. Archived from the original on 2011-08-06. Retrieved 2010-06-25.
  109. "The 25 Dumbest Moments in Gaming – Readers' Top 5". GameSpy. 2003-06-14. Archived from the original on 2004-07-04. Retrieved 2010-06-25.
  110. "Final Fantasy XI Playtest". IGN. 2002-04-05. Archived from the original on 2011-07-13. Retrieved 2010-06-25.
  111. "Final Fantasy VII Ultimania Book Getting Revision". Kotaku. 2009-04-01. Archived from the original on 2011-03-03. Retrieved 2010-06-25.
  112. "Square Enix Game Books Online | ファイナルファンタジーシリーズ" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2010-07-01. Retrieved 2010-07-19.
  113. "The Sky: The Art of Final Fantasy Boxed Set :: Profile :: Dark Horse Comics". Archived from the original on May 30, 2013. Retrieved August 8, 2013.
  114. Kohler, Chris (March 5, 2013). "The Breathtaking Final Fantasy Art of Yoshitaka Amano". Wired . Condé Nast. Archived from the original on August 11, 2013. Retrieved August 8, 2013.
  115. "Amano Yoshitaka "The Sky" Final Fantasy Illustrations by DigiCube". Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved August 8, 2013.
  116. ファイナルファンタジー2 夢魔の迷宮 (in Japanese). Yahoo!. Archived from the original on 2011-08-03. Retrieved 2010-07-26.
  117. 悠久の風伝説 ファイナルファンタジー3より 3 (in Japanese). Yahoo!. Archived from the original on 2011-08-03. Retrieved 2007-08-18.
  118. Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within (Mass Market Paperback). Amazon.com. ISBN   0743424190.
  119. ファイナルファンタジー:アンリミテッド―双の絆 (in Japanese). Amazon.com. ISBN   9784044277017.
  120. ファイナルファンタジー:アンリミテッドアフター~外界の章~ (in Japanese). Amazon.com. ISBN   4887870353.
  121. ファイナルファンタジー11―星の誓い (文庫) (in Japanese). Amazon.com. ISBN   4757714246.
  122. ファイナルファンタジー11 星の誓い (in Japanese). Yahoo!. Archived from the original on 2011-08-03. Retrieved 2007-08-18.
  123. Final Fantasy XI: Das Lied des Sturms, Bd 1 (in German). Amazon.com. ISBN   3833214554.
  124. Final Fantasy XI on line, Tome 1 : Le Chant de la tempête (in French). Amazon.com. ISBN   2265085596.
  125. "FF Crystal Chronicles Goes Comic". IGN. December 18, 2003. Archived from the original on August 3, 2011. Retrieved 2007-01-20.
  126. Final fantasy VII advent children prologue (Shueisha V-Jump) (単行本) (in Japanese). Amazon.com. ISBN   4087793397.
  127. "On the Way to a Smile Final Fantasy Ⅶ" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2012-10-11. Retrieved 2010-07-19.
  128. "ガンガンコミックスOnline 一覧" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2010-08-25. Retrieved 2010-07-19.
  129. "Final Fantasy XI Newsletter Issue 18". PlayOnline. 2007-03-08. Archived from the original on 2009-06-29. Retrieved 2009-08-27.
  130. ファイナルファンタジー・クリスタルクロニクル リング・オブ・フェイト 4コマアンソロジーコミック (in Japanese). Amazon.com. ISBN   4757741030.
  131. 小説 ファイナルファンタジーIV 上 (Game Novels) (新書) (in Japanese). Amazon.com. ISBN   4757524587.
  132. "Square Enix Game Books Online" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2012-10-11. Retrieved 2010-07-08.
  133. Neal (2009-09-28). "Final Fantasy XIII Episode Zero -Promise- (Encounter) released". finalfantasy-xiii.net. Archived from the original on 2012-03-03. Retrieved 2010-06-25.
  134. "Final Fantasy XIII Episode Zero -Promise-" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2013-07-06. Retrieved 2010-07-19.
  135. 1 2 "小説FINAL FANTASYI・II・III Memory of Heroes 公式ページ" (in Japanese). Square Enix. Archived from the original on 2016-03-04. Retrieved 2016-03-23.