North West Durham (UK Parliament constituency)

Last updated
North West Durham
County constituency
for the House of Commons
NorthWestDurham2007Constituency.svg
Boundary of North West Durham in County Durham
EnglandDurham.svg
Location of County Durham within England
County County Durham
Electorate 72,760 (December 2010) [1]
Major settlements Consett, Crook, Lanchester and Willington
Current constituency
Created 1950
Member of Parliament Richard Holden (Conservative)
Number of membersOne
Created from Barnard Castle, Consett, and Spennymoor
18851918
Number of membersOne
Type of constituency County constituency
Replaced by Consett and Barnard Castle
Created from South Durham
North Durham

North West Durham is a constituency [n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 12 December 2019 by Richard Holden of the Conservative Party.

Contents

History

1885–1918

A first incarnation of the seat occurred under the Redistribution of Seats Act 1885 however this was abolished in 1918 to create Consett and to enlarge, using its Weardale part, Barnard Castle. During the first creation, Liberals represented the area and the first member until 1914 was the son of a prominent Chartist, Ernest Jones, and helped to promote New Liberalism, encouraging the Liberal Party to take on instead the politics of "mass working-class" appeal. This politics was epitomised by David Lloyd George whose People's Budget in 1909 led to the supremacy of the House of Commons over the House of Lords in 1911, national pensions under a basic welfare state (but without a National Health Service).

1950–present

On its recreation in 1950, North-West Durham became the successor to Barnard Castle save for the town of that name and its immediate vicinity which instead joined the Bishop Auckland seat. Consett was abolished in 1983 having seen a gradual decline in population in the latter half of its years, and its area was added to North West Durham that year. Until December 2019, this seat has been represented in Westminster by members of the Labour Party, it is now represented by Richard Holden of the Conservative Party.

Both the future Conservative Party leader and Prime Minister, Theresa May, and the future Liberal Democrat leader, Tim Farron, were candidates for their respective parties at this seat for the 1992 general election, which both of them lost to incumbent Labour MP Hilary Armstrong.

Boundaries

North West Durham (UK Parliament constituency)
Map of current boundaries
North West Durham constituency within northern Durham, showing boundaries used from 1885-1918 Northern Durham.jpg
North West Durham constituency within northern Durham, showing boundaries used from 1885–1918

1950–1974: The Urban Districts of Brandon and Byshottles, Crook and Willington, and Tow Law, and the Rural Districts of Lanchester and Weardale.

1974–1983: The Urban Districts of Brandon and Byshottles, Crook and Willington, Spennymoor, and Tow Law, the Rural Districts of Lanchester and Weardale, and the parish of Brancepeth in the Rural District of Durham.

1983–1997: The District of Derwentside wards of Benfieldside, Blackhill, Burnhope, Burnopfield, Castleside, Consett North, Consett South, Cornsay, Crookhall, Delves Lane, Ebchester and Medomsley, Esh, Lanchester, and Leadgate, and the District of Wear Valley wards of Crook North, Crook South, Howden, Hunwick, St John's Chapel, Stanhope, Stanley, Tow Law, Wheatbottom and Helmington Row, Willington East, Willington West, and Wolsingham.

1997–2010: The District of Derwentside wards of Benfieldside, Blackhill, Burnhope, Burnopfield, Castleside, Consett North, Consett South, Cornsay, Crookhall, Delves Lane, Dipton, Ebchester and Medomsley, Esh, Lanchester, and Leadgate, and the District of Wear Valley wards of Crook North, Crook South, Howden, Hunwick, St John's Chapel, Stanhope, Stanley, Tow Law, Wheatbottom and Helmington Row, Willington East, Willington West, and Wolsingham.

2010–present: The District of Derwentside wards of Benfieldside, Blackhill, Burnhope, Burnopfield, Castleside, Consett East, Consett North, Consett South, Cornsay, Delves Lane, Dipton, Ebchester and Medomsley, Esh, Lanchester, and Leadgate, and the District of Wear Valley wards of Crook North, Crook South, Howden, Hunwick, St John's Chapel, Stanhope, Tow Law and Stanley, Wheatbottom and Helmington Row, Willington Central, Willington West End, Wolsingham, and Witton-le-Wear. [2]

The constituency is in the north west of County Durham, in the North East England region. When it was created in 1885 it centred on two main communities, Consett and Lanchester.

It currently consists of the western part of the former Derwentside district (including Consett and Lanchester) and the northern part of the former Wear Valley district (including Weardale, Crook and Willington).

Constituency profile

For many years the area gave large majorities suggesting a safe seat for the Labour Party; the majority of the electorate live in former mining or steel towns, where Labour traditionally have polled higher than other parties with the remainder in rural farms and villages throughout valleys cleft from the eastern, rocky part of the Pennines. The previous MP was Laura Pidcock, who was elected at the 2017 general election. Prior to that, the constituency was served by Pat Glass who announced her intention to step down at the 2017 general election in the wake of the Brexit referendum. Her successor, Laura Pidcock a close supporter of party leader Jeremy Corbyn lost the seat in 2019 general election to the current MP, Richard Holden, as part of the Conservative Party's strategy to target seats in the so-called red wall.

Members of Parliament

MPs 1885–1918

Atherley-Jones Atherley Jones.jpg
Atherley-Jones
ElectionMember [3] Party
1885 Llewellyn Atherley-Jones Liberal
1914 Aneurin Williams Liberal
1918 Constituency abolished

MPs since 1950

ElectionMember [3] Party
1950 Constituency recreated
1950 James Murray Labour
1955 William Ainsley Labour
1964 Ernest Armstrong Labour
1987 Hilary Armstrong Labour
2010 Pat Glass Labour
2017 Laura Pidcock Labour
2019 Richard Holden Conservative

Elections

North west durham graph.png

Elections in the 2010s

#

General election 2019: North West Durham [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Conservative Richard Holden 19,990 41.9 Increase2.svg 7.4
Labour Laura Pidcock 18,84639.5Decrease2.svg 13.3
Brexit Party John Wolstenholme3,1936.7New
Liberal Democrats Michael Peacock2,8315.9Decrease2.svg 1.2
Independent Watts Stelling1,2162.6New
Green David Sewell1,1732.5Increase2.svg 1.4
Independent David Lindsay4140.9New
Majority1,1442.4N/A
Turnout 47,66366.0Decrease2.svg 0.5
Conservative gain from Labour Swing Increase2.svg10.4
General election 2017: North West Durham [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Laura Pidcock 25,308 52.8 Increase2.svg 5.9
Conservative Sally-Ann Hart 16,51634.5Increase2.svg 11.1
Liberal Democrats Owen Temple3,3987.1Decrease2.svg 2.0
UKIP Alan Breeze2,1504.5Decrease2.svg 12.5
Green Dominic Horsman5301.1Decrease2.svg 2.6
Majority8,79218.3Decrease2.svg 5.2
Turnout 47,90266.5Increase2.svg 5.2
Labour hold Swing Decrease2.svg 2.6
General election 2015: North West Durham [6] [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Pat Glass 20,074 46.9 +4.6
Conservative Charlotte Haitham-Taylor10,01823.4+3.4
UKIP Bruce Reid7,26517.0+14.1
Liberal Democrats Owen Temple3,8949.1-15.8
Green Mark Shilcock1,5673.7New
Majority10,05623.5+6.1
Turnout 42,81861.3-0.7
Labour hold Swing +0.6
General election 2010: North West Durham [8] [9] [10]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Pat Glass 18,539 42.3 -11.6
Liberal Democrats Owen Temple10,92724.9+5.0
Conservative Michelle Tempest8,76620.0+3.6
Independent Watts Stelling2,4725.6-4.2
BNP Michael Stewart1,8524.2New
UKIP Andrew McDonald1,2592.9New
Majority7,61217.4-16.6
Turnout 43,81562.0+4.2
Labour hold Swing -8.3

Elections in the 2000s

General election 2005: North West Durham [11]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Hilary Armstrong 21,312 53.9 -8.6
Liberal Democrats Alan Ord7,86919.9+5.0
Conservative Jamie Devlin6,46316.4-4.5
Independent Watts Stelling3,8659.8New
Majority13,44334.0-7.4
Turnout 39,50958.0−0.5
Labour hold Swing −6.8
General election 2001: North West Durham [12]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Hilary Armstrong 24,526 62.5 -6.3
Conservative William Clouston8,19320.9+5.6
Liberal Democrats Alan Ord5,84614.9+4.1
Socialist Labour Joan Hartnell6611.7New
Majority16,33341.6-11.9
Turnout 39,22658.5-10.2
Labour hold Swing -5.9

Elections in the 1990s

General election 1997: North West Durham [13]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Hilary Armstrong 31,855 68.8 +10.7
Conservative Louise St John-Howe7,10115.3-12.0
Liberal Democrats Anthony Gillings4,99110.8-3.9
Referendum Rodney Atkinson 2,3725.1New
Majority24,75453.5+23.3
Turnout 46,31968.7-6.8
Labour hold Swing +11.4

General election 1992: North West Durham [14] [15]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Hilary Armstrong 26,734 57.8 +6.9
Conservative Theresa May 12,74727.6−0.8
Liberal Democrats Tim Farron 6,72814.6-6.1
Majority13,98730.2+7.7
Turnout 46,20975.5+2.0
Labour hold Swing +3.4

Elections in the 1980s

General election 1987: North West Durham [16]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Hilary Armstrong 22,94750.9+6.3
Conservative Derek Iceton12,78528.36-1.41
Liberal Chris Foote Wood 9,34920.74-4.91
Majority10,16222.54
Turnout 45,08173.54
Labour hold Swing
General election 1983: North West Durham [17] [18]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ernest Armstrong 19,13544.58
Conservative T Middleton12,77929.77
Liberal Chris Foote Wood 11,00825.65
Majority6,35614.81
Turnout 42,92370.66
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s

General election 1979: North West Durham [19]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ernest Armstrong 29,52561.30
Conservative T Fenwick14,24529.58
Liberal J Hannibell4,3949.12
Majority15,28031.72
Turnout 48,16175.98
Labour hold Swing
General election October 1974: North West Durham [20]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ernest Armstrong 27,95364.16
Conservative MJB Cookson9,19721.11
Liberal JK Forster6,41814.73
Majority18,75643.05
Turnout 43,56671.09
Labour hold Swing
General election February 1974: North West Durham [21]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ernest Armstrong 28,32659.01
Conservative J Riddell10,86522.64
Liberal JK Forster8,80918.35
Majority17,46136.37
Turnout 47,99979.09
Labour hold Swing
General election 1970: North West Durham [22]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ernest Armstrong 24,245 69.6 -4.0
Conservative Alan E Page10,59030.4+4.0
Majority13,65539.2-8.0
Turnout 34,83472.8-0.6
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s

General election 1966:
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ernest Armstrong 25,26073.58
Conservative Colin Nevil Glen MacAndrew, 2nd Baron MacAndrew9,07026.42
Majority16,19047.16
Turnout 34,33073.37
Labour hold Swing
General election 1964: North West Durham
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour Ernest Armstrong 26,00669.75
Conservative Kenneth L Ellis11,28030.25
Majority14,72639.50
Turnout 37,28677.98
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s

General election 1959: North West Durham
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour William Ainsley 28,06468.06
Conservative Olive Sinclair13,17231.94
Majority14,89236.12
Turnout 41,23681.45
Labour hold Swing
General election 1955: North West Durham
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour William Ainsley 27,11667.41
Conservative Thomas T Hubble13,11032.59
Majority14,00634.82
Turnout 40,22679.05
Labour hold Swing
General election 1951: North West Durham
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour James Murray 30,41768.66
Conservative James Quigley13,88531.34
Majority16,53237.32
Turnout 44,30285.06
Labour hold Swing
General election 1950: North West Durham
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Labour James Murray 31,08469.67
Conservative James Quigley13,53030.33
Majority17,55439.34
Turnout 44,61486.52
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1910s

Aneurin Williams 1910 Aneurin Williams.jpg
Aneurin Williams
1914 North West Durham by-election [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Aneurin Williams 7,241 40.6 14.5
Unionist James Ogden Hardicker5,56431.23.7
Labour G. H. Stuart-Bunning 5,02628.2New
Majority1,6779.420.8
Turnout 17,83188.1+12.8
Registered electors 20,233
Liberal hold Swing 5.4
Atherley-Jones Llewellyn Atherley-Jones.jpg
Atherley-Jones
General election December 1910: North West Durham [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Llewellyn Atherley-Jones 8,998 65.1 1.7
Conservative James Ogden Hardicker4,82734.9+1.7
Majority4,17130.23.4
Turnout 13,82575.310.3
Registered electors 18,361
Liberal hold Swing 1.7
General election January 1910: North West Durham [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Llewellyn Atherley-Jones 10,497 66.8 2.8
Conservative J.L. Knott5,22733.2+2.8
Majority5,27033.65.6
Turnout 15,72485.6+5.4
Registered electors 18,361
Liberal hold Swing 2.8

Elections in the 1900s

General election 1906: North West Durham [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Llewellyn Atherley-Jones 9,146 69.6 +19.5
Conservative Robert Marcus Filmer 3,99930.419.5
Majority5,14739.2+39.0
Turnout 13,14580.2+5.2
Registered electors 16,384
Liberal hold Swing +19.5
General election 1900: North West Durham [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Llewellyn Atherley-Jones 5,158 50.1 8.3
Conservative J. Joicey5,13749.9+8.3
Majority210.216.6
Turnout 10,29575.06.9
Registered electors 13,725
Liberal hold Swing 8.3

Elections in the 1890s

General election 1895: North West Durham [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Llewellyn Atherley-Jones 5,428 58.4 5.5
Conservative J. Joicey3,86941.6+5.5
Majority1,55916.811.0
Turnout 9,29781.9+4.3
Registered electors 11,346
Liberal hold Swing 5.5
General election 1892: North West Durham [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Llewellyn Atherley-Jones 5,121 63.9 N/A
Liberal Unionist John D Dunville [24] 2,89136.1New
Majority2,23027.8N/A
Turnout 8,01277.6N/A
Registered electors 10,330
Liberal hold Swing N/A

Elections in the 1880s

General election 1886: North West Durham [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Llewellyn Atherley-Jones Unopposed
Liberal hold
General election 1885: North West Durham [23]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Liberal Llewellyn Atherley-Jones 5,081 62.2
Conservative Arthur Bootle-Wilbraham3,08537.8
Majority1,99624.4
Turnout 8,16685.6
Registered electors 9,543
Liberal win (new seat)

See also

Notes and references

Notes
  1. A county constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
References
  1. "Electorate Figures – Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  2. "The Parliamentary Constituencies (England) Order 2007". National Archives. Retrieved 21 June 2016. Theis article contains quotations from this source, which is available under the Open Government Licence v3.0.
  3. 1 2 Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "D" (part 4)
  4. "Durham North West Parliamentary constituency". BBC News. BBC. Retrieved 24 November 2019.
  5. "See which candidates will be standing in your constituency in the General Election". The Northern Echo.
  6. "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  7. "Durham North West". BBC News. Retrieved 15 May 2015.
  8. "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015.
  9. http://www.durham.gov.uk/PDFApproved/ParliamentaryElection2010_SoPN_Rev_NWD.pdf
  10. "BBC NEWS – Election 2010 – Durham North West". BBC News.
  11. "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  12. "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  13. "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  14. "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  15. "Politics Resources". Election 1992. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Archived from the original on 24 July 2011. Retrieved 2010-12-06.
  16. "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  17. "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015.
  18. "UK General Election results: June 1983 [Archive]". www.politicsresources.net. Archived from the original on 2015-09-24. Retrieved 2009-09-25.
  19. "UK General Election results: May 1979 [Archive]". www.politicsresources.net. Archived from the original on 2015-09-24. Retrieved 2009-09-25.
  20. "UK General Election results: October 1974 [Archive]". www.politicsresources.net. Archived from the original on 2017-08-20. Retrieved 2009-09-25.
  21. "UK General Election results: February 1974 [Archive]". www.politicsresources.net. Archived from the original on 2017-08-20. Retrieved 2009-09-25.
  22. "UK General Election results 1970 [Archive]". www.politicsresources.net. Archived from the original on 2015-09-24. Retrieved 2009-09-25.
  23. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Craig, FWS, ed. (1974). British Parliamentary Election Results: 1885-1918. London: Macmillan Press. ISBN   9781349022984.
  24. "Mr. John Dunville in North-West Durham". Belfast News Letter . 14 Nov 1890. p. 3. Retrieved 21 November 2017.

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