St. Paul's Episcopal Church (Richmond, Virginia)

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St. Paul's Episcopal Church
StPaulsEpiscopalRichmond.JPG
Image of St. Paul's Church in Richmond, Virginia, USA
Religion
Affiliation Episcopal Church
Ecclesiastical or organizational status Active
LeadershipThe Rev. Charlie Dupree, the Rev. Rainey Dankel, and the Rev. Ben Campbell
Year consecrated1845
StatusActive
Location
Location815 E. Grace St., Richmond, Virginia
State Virginia
Geographic coordinates 37°32′24″N77°26′07″W / 37.540112°N 77.435390°W / 37.540112; -77.435390
Architecture
Architect(s) Thomas Somerville Stewart
Style Greek Revival
Completed1845
Specifications
Direction of façadenortheast
Capacity850
Materials
St. Paul's Church
USA Virginia location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Usa edcp location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location815 E. Grace St., Richmond, Virginia
Coordinates 37°32′23″N77°26′7″W / 37.53972°N 77.43528°W / 37.53972; -77.43528 Coordinates: 37°32′23″N77°26′7″W / 37.53972°N 77.43528°W / 37.53972; -77.43528
Area0.8 acres (0.32 ha)
Built1845 (1845)
ArchitectSteward, Thomas B.
Architectural styleGreek Revival
NRHP reference No. 69000357 [1]
VLR No.127-0014
Significant dates
Added to NRHPJune 4, 1969
Designated VLRNovember 5, 1968 [2]
Website
https://www.stpaulsrva.org/

St. Paul's Episcopal Church is an historic Episcopal church in Richmond, Virginia, United States. Located directly across the street from the Virginia State Capitol, it has long been a popular house of worship for political figures, including General Robert E. Lee and Confederate President Jefferson Davis [3] (earning it the nickname "the Cathedral of the Confederacy"). [4] Davis was a member.

Other notable people associated with the church are Rev. Dr. Charles Minnigerode, who led the church during the Civil War and Reconstruction eras. The Right. Rev. John Shelby Spong, now retired as bishop of the Diocese of Newark, began to attract national attention while rector of St. Paul's (1969–1976).

St. Paul's was built in 1845 as a branch of the Monumental Church, which had outgrown its building. The Greek Revival church was designed by Thomas Somerville Stewart and modeled largely on St. Luke's Church, now Church of St. Luke & the Epiphany, in Philadelphia. [5] It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1969 as St. Paul's Church. [1]

The corner stone was laid on 10-Oct-1843 according to the St. Paul's History book. [6] Consecration was 11-Nov-1845.

The same book estimates the probable cost, before construction, as "not exceeding $53,500". That excludes the organ and lot. Later an approximation of $55,000 is given. Organ is estimated at $4,000 and lot was $6,000 and then an additional lot was added for $1,075. The book also reports that there were 804 sittings in the nave and 358 in the gallery for a total of 1162.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Archived from the original on 21 September 2013. Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  3. "St. Paul's Church National Register Nomination Form" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Archived from the original (PDF) on 18 August 2010. Retrieved 11 July 2011.
  4. "'Cathedral of the Confederacy' reckons with its history and charts future". 19 June 2017.
  5. "Who We Are: History", StPauls-Episcopal.org, archived from the original on 2011-04-11, retrieved 2011-02-28
  6. "St. Paul's Episcopal Church: 150 years : 1845-1995". Pine Tree Press (1995).