Thomas Reynolds (bishop)

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Thomas Reynolds (also "Reynold" or "Raynolds") (died c.1560) was an English bishop and academic. He was the Warden of Merton College, Oxford from 1545 and was created Bishop of Hereford by Mary I.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

Warden is the title given to or adopted by the heads of some university colleges and other institutions.

Merton College, Oxford college of the University of Oxford

Merton College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of Oxford in England. Its foundation can be traced back to the 1260s when Walter de Merton, chancellor to Henry III and later to Edward I, first drew up statutes for an independent academic community and established endowments to support it. An important feature of Walter's foundation was that this "college" was to be self-governing and the endowments were directly vested in the Warden and Fellows.

Life

A cleric of the reformed Church of England under Edward VI, after the Restoration he was a chaplain to Queen Mary, who gave him preferment and created him Dean of Exeter in 1555. He also served as Vice-Chancellor of the University of Oxford. On the accession of Elizabeth I, the formalities for his post as bishop were not yet complete and he was deprived. He died in the Marshalsea Prison. [1] [2]

Church of England Anglican state church of England

The Church of England is the established church of England. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England is also the mother church of the international Anglican Communion. It traces its history to the Christian church recorded as existing in the Roman province of Britain by the third century, and to the 6th-century Gregorian mission to Kent led by Augustine of Canterbury.

Chaplain Provider of pastoral care, often a minister of a religious tradition, attached to an institution

A chaplain is, traditionally, a cleric, or a lay representative of a religious tradition, attached to a secular institution such as a hospital, prison, military unit, school, labor union, business, police department, fire department, university, or private chapel.

Dean of Exeter

The Dean of Exeter is the head of the Chapter of Cathedral Church of Saint Peter in Exeter, England. The chapter was established by William Briwere, Bishop of Exeter (1224–44) who set up the offices of dean and chancellor of Exeter Cathedral, allowing the chapter to elect those officers. The deanery is at 10 The Close, Exeter. The current dean is Jonathan Greener.

Reynolds was the uncle of John Reynolds and William Reynolds, of a family near Pinhoe, Devon. Adam Hamilton has argued for a relationship to Richard Reynolds, and incidentally for an identification of Thomas Reynolds as a Catholic at an earlier period of his life. [3] [4]

John Rainolds English theologian

John Rainolds was an English academic and churchman, of Puritan views. He is remembered for his role in the Authorized Version of the Bible, a project of which he was initiator.

William Reynolds was an English Roman Catholic theologian and Biblical scholar.

Pinhoe village in United Kingdom

Pinhoe is a suburb on the north eastern outskirts of Exeter in the English county of Devon, which was incorporated into the city in 1966. The 2001 census recorded a population of 6,108 people resident within Pinhoe Ward, one of 18 wards comprising the City of Exeter. The population increased to 6,454 at the 2011 Census

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References

  1. H. E. Salter and Mary D. Lobel, ed. (1954). "Merton College". A History of the County of Oxford: Volume 3: The University of Oxford. British History Online. Victoria County History. pp. 95–106.
  2. Norman Leslie Jones, The English Reformation: religion and cultural adaptation (2002), p. 116.
  3. Thomas Fowler, Corpus Christi (1898), p. 90.
  4. Adam Hamilton, The Angel of Syon: the life and martyrdom of Blessed Richard Reynolds, martyred at Tyburn, May 4, 1535 (1905), pp. 91–92.
Academic offices
Preceded by
Henry Tindall
Warden of Merton College, Oxford
1545–1559
Succeeded by
James Gervase
Preceded by
William Tresham
Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University
1556–1557
Succeeded by
Thomas Whyte
Church of England titles
Preceded by
Robert Parfew
Bishop of Hereford
1557–1558
Succeeded by
John Scory