Thomas Skelton House

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Thomas Skelton House
FalmouthME ThomasSkeltonHouse.jpg
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Nearest city 124 US 1, Falmouth, Maine
Coordinates 43°42′28″N70°14′14″W / 43.70778°N 70.23722°W / 43.70778; -70.23722 Coordinates: 43°42′28″N70°14′14″W / 43.70778°N 70.23722°W / 43.70778; -70.23722
Area 1 acre (0.40 ha)
Built 1798 (1798)
Architectural style Federal
NRHP reference # 73000124 [1]
Added to NRHP May 7, 1973

The Thomas Skelton House is an historic house at 124 United States Route 1 in Falmouth, Maine. Built about 1798 in Portland, it is a well-preserved example of Federal style architecture. It was moved to its present site in 1971 to avoid demolition. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on May 7, 1973. [1]

Falmouth, Maine Town in Maine, United States

Falmouth is a town in Cumberland County, Maine, United States. The population was 11,185 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Portland–South Portland–Biddeford, Maine metropolitan statistical area.

Portland, Maine largest city in Maine

Portland is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Maine, with a population of 67,067 as of 2017. The Greater Portland metropolitan area is home to over half a million people, more than one-third of Maine's total population, making it the most populous metro in northern New England. Portland is Maine's economic center, with an economy that relies on the service sector and tourism. The Old Port district is a popular destination known for its 19th-century architecture and nightlife. Marine industry still plays an important role in the city's economy, with an active waterfront that supports fishing and commercial shipping. The Port of Portland is the largest tonnage seaport in New England.

Federal architecture architectural style

Federal-style architecture is the name for the classicizing architecture built in the newly founded United States between c. 1780 and 1830, and particularly from 1785 to 1815. This style shares its name with its era, the Federalist Era. The name Federal style is also used in association with furniture design in the United States of the same time period. The style broadly corresponds to the classicism of Biedermeier style in the German-speaking lands, Regency architecture in Britain and to the French Empire style.

Contents

Description and history

The Thomas Skelton House stands at the northern corner of Old US 1 and Gilsland Farm Road in southeastern Falmouth. It is a 2-1/2 story wood frame structure, five bays wide, with a side gable roof, central chimney, clapboard siding, and a concrete foundation faced in brick. The house is oriented facing southeast, on a lot that also includes a garage and former carriage barn. Its main entrance is in the center, flanked by pilasters and topped by a simple entablature. The interior retains original plaster and woodwork, and follows a typical center-chimney plan. The entry vestibule has a narrow winding stair leading to the second floor, with parlor to the left and kitchen to the right, with a long and narrow room behind the chimney. A modern shed-roof ell has been added to the rear, in which modern kitchen facilities are located. [2]

The house was built about 1798 by Thomas Skelton, a Portland housewright, and stood on Pleasant Street in Portland. Originally 1-1/2 stories in height, the second story was added about 1810, around the time its owner, Benjamin Deake, married. Threatened with demolition, the building was carefully documented in 1971 by the Greater Portland Landmarks Commission, and then moved to this site and restored. It is one of Portland's oldest surviving buildings. [2]

See also

National Register of Historic Places listings in Cumberland County, Maine Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Cumberland County, Maine.

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