Thomas T. Wright House

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Thomas T. Wright House

Thomas T. Wright House.jpg

Thomas T. Wright House, June 2012
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Location Southwest of Vevay on State Road 56, Craig Township, Switzerland County, Indiana
Coordinates 38°42′43″N85°7′25″W / 38.71194°N 85.12361°W / 38.71194; -85.12361 Coordinates: 38°42′43″N85°7′25″W / 38.71194°N 85.12361°W / 38.71194; -85.12361
Area 2 acres (0.81 ha)
Built 1838 (1838)
Built by Kyle, George
Architectural style Greek Revival
NRHP reference # 80000066 [1]
Added to NRHP December 10, 1980

Thomas T. Wright House, also known as the Old Hildreth Home, is a historic home located in Craig Township, Switzerland County, Indiana. The house is situated on a hill overlooking the Ohio River. It was built in 1838, and is a two-story, five bay, Greek Revival style brick dwelling with later additions. It features a two-tier front portico supported by Doric order columns. [2] :2

Craig Township, Switzerland County, Indiana Township in Indiana, United States

Craig Township is one of six townships in Switzerland County, Indiana, United States. As of the 2010 census, its population was 900 and it contained 477 housing units.

Switzerland County, Indiana County in the United States

Switzerland County is a county located in the U.S. state of Indiana. As of 2010, the population was 10,613. The county seat is Vevay.

Ohio River river in the midwestern United States

The Ohio River is a 981-mile (1,579 km) long river in the midwestern United States that flows southwesterly from western Pennsylvania south of Lake Erie to its mouth on the Mississippi River at the southern tip of Illinois. It is the second largest river by discharge volume in the United States and the largest tributary by volume of the north-south flowing Mississippi River that divides the eastern from western United States. The river flows through or along the border of six states, and its drainage basin includes parts of 15 states. Through its largest tributary, the Tennessee River, the basin includes several states of the southeastern U.S. It is the source of drinking water for three million people.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1980. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Indiana State Historic Architectural and Archaeological Research Database (SHAARD)" (Searchable database). Department of Natural Resources, Division of Historic Preservation and Archaeology. Retrieved 2016-07-01.Note: This includes Ann Farnsley and Mary Alice Hermsdorfer (November 1978). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thomas T. Wright House" (PDF). Retrieved 2016-07-01.