Thomas Wallace House

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Thomas Wallace House

WallaceHousePetersburg.JPG

Thomas Wallace House, December 2009
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Location SW corner of Brown and S. Market Sts., Petersburg, Virginia
Coordinates 37°13′26″N77°24′22″W / 37.22389°N 77.40611°W / 37.22389; -77.40611 Coordinates: 37°13′26″N77°24′22″W / 37.22389°N 77.40611°W / 37.22389; -77.40611
Area less than one acre
Built c. 1855 (1855)
Architectural style Italianate
NRHP reference # 75002116 [1]
VLR # 123-0031
Significant dates
Added to NRHP May 2, 1975
Designated VLR April 15, 1975 [2]

Thomas Wallace House is a historic home located at Petersburg, Virginia. It was built about 1855, and is a two-story, three-bay, pressed brick dwelling in the Italianate style. It sits on a raised basement and has a low hipped roof with bracketed cornice. It has a one-story rear service wing and a front porch supported by six fluted Greek Doric order columns. On April 3, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln and General Ulysses S. Grant met in its library to discuss the inevitable end to the American Civil War and the surrender. [3]

Petersburg, Virginia Independent city in Commonwealth of Virginia, United States

Petersburg is an independent city in the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 32,420. The Bureau of Economic Analysis combines Petersburg with Dinwiddie County for statistical purposes. It is located on the Appomattox River. The city is just 21 miles (34 km) south of the historic commonwealth (state) capital city of Richmond. The city's unique industrial past and its location as a transportation hub combined to create wealth for Virginia and the Middle Atlantic and Upper South regions of the nation.

Italianate architecture 19th-century phase in the history of Classical architecture

The Italianate style of architecture was a distinct 19th-century phase in the history of Classical architecture.

Doric order Order of ancient Greek and Roman architecture, with no base to the column, simple capital, and triglyphs on the frieze

The Doric order was one of the three orders of ancient Greek and later Roman architecture; the other two canonical orders were the Ionic and the Corinthian. The Doric is most easily recognized by the simple circular capitals at the top of columns. Originating in the western Dorian region of Greece, it is the earliest and in its essence the simplest of the orders, though still with complex details in the entablature above.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. [1] It is located in the South Market Street Historic District.

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

South Market Street Historic District

South Market Street Historic District is a national historic district located at Petersburg, Virginia. The district includes 15 contributing buildings and 1 contributing object located in a predominantly residential section of Petersburg. It includes a varied collection of mid- to late-19th-century houses and includes notable examples of Late Victorian and Colonial Revival style architecture. Notable buildings include the Mt. Olivet Baptist Church (1858), Scott House (1855), and Williams House (1879). Located in the district and separately listed is the Thomas Wallace House.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  3. Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission Staff (April 1975). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Thomas Wallace House" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources. and Accompanying photo