Thomas and Mary Hepworth House

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Thomas and Mary Hepworth House

Hepworth House Salt Lake City Utah.jpeg

Hepworth House in 2009
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Location 725 West 200 North,
Salt Lake City, Utah
Coordinates 40°46′25″N111°54′40″W / 40.77361°N 111.91111°W / 40.77361; -111.91111 Coordinates: 40°46′25″N111°54′40″W / 40.77361°N 111.91111°W / 40.77361; -111.91111
Area 0.29 acres (0.12 ha)
Built 1877 (1877)
Architect Unknown
Architectural style Italianate, I-house
NRHP reference # 00000404 [1]
Added to NRHP April 21, 2000

The Thomas & Mary Hepworth House is a historic house located at 725 West 200 North in Salt Lake City, Utah.

Description and history

Constructed in 1877, it is locally significant as the only known example of two-story, Italianate I-house design in Salt Lake City. It is significant architecturally as an expression of traditional central-passage plan houses in Utah, but also "updated with more vertical Victorian proportions and with stylish Italianate detailing." [2] :7

Italianate architecture 19th-century phase in the history of Classical architecture

The Italianate style of architecture was a distinct 19th-century phase in the history of Classical architecture.

I-house

The I-house is a vernacular house type, popular in the United States from the colonial period onward. The I-house was so named in the 1930s by Fred Kniffen, a cultural geographer at Louisiana State University who was a specialist in folk architecture. He identified and analyzed the type in his 1936 study of Louisiana house types. He chose the name "I-house" because of its common occurrence in the rural farm areas of Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, all states beginning with the letter "I". He did not use the term to imply that this house type originated in, or was restricted to, those three states. It is also referred to as Plantation Plain style.

Victorian architecture series of architectural revival styles

Victorian architecture is a series of architectural revival styles in the mid-to-late 19th century. Victorian refers to the reign of Queen Victoria (1837–1901), called the Victorian era, during which period the styles known as Victorian were used in construction. However, many elements of what is typically termed "Victorian" architecture did not become popular until later in Victoria's reign. The styles often included interpretations and eclectic revivals of historic styles. The name represents the British and French custom of naming architectural styles for a reigning monarch. Within this naming and classification scheme, it followed Georgian architecture and later Regency architecture, and was succeeded by Edwardian architecture.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 21, 2000. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References