Thorpeness Windmill

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Thorpeness Mill
Thorpeness windmill.jpg
Thorpeness Mill
Origin
Mill nameThorpeness Mill
Mill location TM 468 598
Coordinates 52°10′53″N1°36′32″E / 52.1815°N 1.6089°E / 52.1815; 1.6089 Coordinates: 52°10′53″N1°36′32″E / 52.1815°N 1.6089°E / 52.1815; 1.6089
Operator(s)Private
Year built1923
Information
Purpose Pumping water
Type Hollow Post mill
Roundhouse storeysOne storey
No. of sailsFour Sails
Type of sails Patent sails
Windshaft Cast iron
Winding Fantail
Fantail bladesSix blades
Type of pumpThree throw pump

Thorpeness Windmill is a Grade II listed [1] post mill at Thorpeness, Suffolk, England which was built in 1803 at Aldringham and moved to Thorpeness in 1923. Originally built as a corn mill, it was converted to a water pumping mill when it was moved to Thorpeness. It pumped water to the House in the Clouds.

Listed building Protected historic structure in the United Kingdom

A listed building, or listed structure, is one that has been placed on one of the four statutory lists maintained by Historic England in England, Historic Environment Scotland in Scotland, Cadw in Wales, and the Northern Ireland Environment Agency in Northern Ireland.

Post mill earliest type of European windmill

The post mill is the earliest type of European windmill. Its defining feature is that the whole body of the mill that houses the machinery is mounted on a single vertical post, around which it can be turned to bring the sails into the wind.

Thorpeness village in United Kingdom

Thorpeness is a village in the county of Suffolk, England. It belongs to the parish of Aldringham cum Thorpe and lies within the Suffolk Coast and Heaths AONB.

Contents

History

Thorpeness Mill was built as a corn mill at Aldringham in 1803. In the 1890s the Ogilvy family were the millers. [2]

In the winter of 1922, Aldringham Mill was dismantled by Messrs Whitmore's, millwrights of Wickham Market. Amos Clarke was millwright in charge. [3] It was rebuilt at Thorpeness to supply water to the House in the Clouds, which is really a water tower disguised as a house. [2]

A millwright is a high-precision craftsman or skilled tradesperson who installs, dismantles, repairs, reassembles, and moves machinery in factories, power plants, and construction sites.

Wickham Market farm village in the United Kingdom

Wickham Market is a large village and electoral ward situated in the River Deben valley of Suffolk, England, within the Suffolk Coastal heritage area.

Water tower Elevated structure supporting a tank

A water tower is an elevated structure supporting a water tank constructed at a height sufficient to pressurize a water supply system for the distribution of potable water, and to provide emergency storage for fire protection. In some places, the term standpipe is used interchangeably to refer to a water tower. Water towers often operate in conjunction with underground or surface service reservoirs, which store treated water close to where it will be used. Other types of water towers may only store raw (non-potable) water for fire protection or industrial purposes, and may not necessarily be connected to a public water supply.

The mill was used to supply the House in the clouds until 1940, when an engine was installed to do the job. [2] During the war, some children blocked the tramway that the winding wheels driven by the fantail run on, with the result that the steps lifted up and the mill tilted forward, leaving the steps in the air. Although a number of men sat on the steps of the mill, it would not return to its natural state. Millwright Ted Friend, of Whitmore's was called in and soon restored the mill to normal with deft use of a sledge hammer. [3] In 1972, the fantail was blown off in a storm [2] and in September 1973 the mill was damaged by a fire on the heath where it stands. One sail and stock were destroyed. In 1975, Suffolk Coastal District Council, Thorpeness Estate and the Countryside Commission granted money to enable the mill to be restored. The mill was restored in 1977 and subsequently purchased from the Thorpeness Estate by Suffolk County Council. [3]

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 70 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

Suffolk Coastal Non-metropolitan district in England

Suffolk Coastal was a local government district in Suffolk, England. Its council was based in Melton, having moved from neighbouring Woodbridge in 2017. Other towns include Felixstowe, Framlingham, Leiston, Aldeburgh, and Saxmundham.

The Countryside Commission was a statutory body in England and Wales, and later in England only. Its forerunner, the National Parks Commission, was established in 1949 by the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 to co-ordinate government activity in relation to National Parks.

In 2010 the Council put the Windmill on the market for sale at an estimated price £150,000. [4]

The Council accepted an offer of £72,100 in November 2010 (figures from Land Registry)

Description

Thorpeness Mill is a post mill on a single storey roundhouse. It is winded by a fantail arranged in the Suffolk style. The four Patent sails are carried on a cast iron windshaft. The brake wheel drives a three throw pump which pumped water from a well 28 feet (8.53 m) deep to water tanks housed in the House in the Clouds. [2] The mill could pump 1,800 imperial gallons (8,200 l) per hour. [3] The mill is winded by a six bladed fantail mounted on the ladder. [2]

Millers

Public access

Thorpeness Windmill is now in private hands and as such there is no public access .The windmill will be open on an ad hoc basis by the owner. For more information, look for "Friends of Thorpeness Windmill" on Facebook.

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The House in the Clouds is a water tower at Thorpeness, Suffolk, England. It was built in 1923 to receive water pumped from Thorpeness Windmill and was designed to improve the looks of the water tower, disguising its tank with the appearance of a weatherboarded building more in keeping with Thorpeness's mock-Tudor and Jacobean style, except seeming to float above the trees. The original capacity of the water tank was 50,000 imperial gallons (230,000 l) but during the Second World War, the House in the Clouds was hit by gunfire from anti-aircraft guns based at Thorpeness. The water tank was repaired using its own steel, which resulted in a reduced capacity of 30,000 imperial gallons (140,000 l). In 1977 the water tower was made redundant by a mains water supply to the village, and additional living space was created. In 1979 the main water tank was removed to fully convert the building into a house. The building currently has five bedrooms and three bathrooms; it contains a total of 85 steps from top to bottom and is around 70 ft high.

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References

  1. Historic England. "THORPENESS MILL, ALDRINGHAM CUM THORPE, SUFFOLK COASTAL, SUFFOLK (1215702)". National Heritage List for England . Retrieved 10 May 2009.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Regan, Dean (1997). Windmills of Suffolk. Suffolk: Dean Regan. pp. 26–28. ISBN   0-9531562-0-6.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Flint, Brian (1979). Suffolk Windmills. Woodbridge: Boydell. pp. 78, 81, 101, 111. ISBN   0-85115-112-4.
  4. McGhie, Caroline (25 June 2010). "A windmill and other quirky properties in Suffolk for sale". Telegraph Media Group. Retrieved 6 October 2010.