Three Hills (Warm Springs, Virginia)

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Three Hills
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Location348 Three Hills Ln., near Warm Springs, Virginia
Coordinates 38°02′44″N79°46′57″W / 38.04556°N 79.78250°W / 38.04556; -79.78250 Coordinates: 38°02′44″N79°46′57″W / 38.04556°N 79.78250°W / 38.04556; -79.78250
Area27.24 acres (11.02 ha)
Built1913 (1913)
ArchitectCarneal and Johnston
Architectural styleItalian Renaissance, Colonial Revival
NRHP reference # 13000986 [1]
VLR #008-0050
Significant dates
Added to NRHPDecember 24, 2013
Designated VLRSeptember 19, 2013 [2]
Three Hills, home of novelist Mary Johnston, Warm Springs, Virginia, 1915. Three-Hills-ca1915.jpg
Three Hills, home of novelist Mary Johnston, Warm Springs, Virginia, 1915.

Three Hills is a historic home located near Warm Springs, Bath County, Virginia. It was built in 1913, and is a 2 1/2-story, frame and stucco Italian Renaissance style dwelling. It consists of a central block with flanking two-story wings and rear additions. The house has a Colonial Revival style interior. The front facade features a single-story, flat-roofed portico. Also on the property are the contributing small formal boxwood garden, three frame and stucco, one-story cottages, and a stone and brick freestanding chimney. Three Hills was built by American novelist and women's rights advocate Mary Johnston (1870-1936), who lived and operated an inn there until her death. [3] J. Ambler Johnston, a young architect, distant relative of the writer and one of the founding partners of the Carneal and Johnston architectural firm (recently merged with Ballou Justice Upton), designed the house. [3]

Warm Springs, Virginia Census-designated place in Virginia, United States

Warm Springs is a census-designated place (CDP) in and the county seat of Bath County, Virginia, United States. The population as of the 2010 Census was 123. It lies along U.S. Route 220 near the center of the county. Warm Springs includes the historical mill town called Germantown.

Bath County, Virginia County in the United States

Bath County is a United States county located on the central western border of the Commonwealth of Virginia, on the West Virginia state line. As of the 2010 census, the population was 4,731; in 2015, the population was estimated at 4,470, it the second-least populous county in Virginia. Bath's county seat is Warm Springs.

Stucco material made of aggregates, a binder, and water

Stucco or render is a construction material made of aggregates, a binder, and water. Stucco is applied wet and hardens to a very dense solid. It is used as a decorative coating for walls and ceilings, and as a sculptural and artistic material in architecture. Stucco may be used to cover less visually appealing construction materials, such as metal, concrete, cinder block, or clay brick and adobe.

Another home of Johnston's listed on the National Register of Historic Places is Linden Row in Richmond. [4]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

Linden Row

Linden Row is a set of seven historic rowhouses located in Richmond, Virginia. They were built in 1847 and 1853, and are three-story, Greek Revival style brick veneer townhouses on high basements and topped by a simple white cornice of wood. Each house has an identical Grecian Doric order entrance porch supported by two fluted Doric columns. A three-story porch runs the entire length of the back of the houses. Linden Row includes a house owned by noted author Mary Johnston, who died there in 1936.

It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2013. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 12/23/13 through 12/27/13. National Park Service. 2014-01-03.
  2. "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 19 March 2013.
  3. 1 2 Cox Bryan, Mollie (March 3, 2016). "Ahead of her Time". Virginia Living . Cape Fear Publishing. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  4. David Edwards and Peter Luebke (August 2013). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Three Hills" (PDF). Virginia Department of Historic Resources. and Accompanying six photos

Additional Reading

"Three Hills: The Home of Mary Johnston." Virginia Suffrage News, November 1, 1914. https://virginiachronicle.com/?a=d&d=VSN19141101&e=-------en-20--1--txt-txIN-------