Thuesen-Petersen House

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Thuesen-Petersen House
Thuesen-Petersen House Scipio Utah.jpeg
Location260 W. Center St., Scipio, Utah
Coordinates 39°14′30″N112°06′13″W / 39.24167°N 112.10361°W / 39.24167; -112.10361 (Thuesen-Petersen House) Coordinates: 39°14′30″N112°06′13″W / 39.24167°N 112.10361°W / 39.24167; -112.10361 (Thuesen-Petersen House)
Arealess than one acre
Builtc.1870
Built byThuesen, John
Architectural styleLate Victorian, Greek Revival
MPS Scandinavian-American Pair-houses TR
NRHP reference # 83004398 [1]
Added to NRHPFebruary 1, 1983

The Thuesen-Petersen House, located at 260 W. Center St. in Scipio, Utah, is a historic pair-house which was built in c.1870. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1983. [1] [2]

Scipio, Utah Town in Utah, United States

Scipio is a town on the eastern edge of Millard County, Utah, United States. The population was 290 at the 2000 census.

A pair-house is a three-room house found in the US built in the 19th century by Scandinavian immigrants as an adaptation of common houses from their homeland. Commonly found in the US state of Utah, pair-houses are historically significant as being representative of ethnic diversity in an area and time that favored uniformity among followers of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. A number of pair-houses are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

It was deemed "significant as an example of Scandinavian vernacular architecture in Utah" in its historic site inventory form, which describes it:

This house is an example of the TYPE IV pair house, a type distinguished by the presence of an indented porch on the facade. The house is built of a locally fired, yellow brick with the walls laid in a common bond fashion. Originally the house was only a single story and had straight gable roof and stove chimneys paired internally on the ridge. The distinctive second story which stands today was added in 1887. Expanding the house here simply meant adding a second story gabled room to each of the existing three bays. The house mixes Greek Revival and Victorian stylistic impulses. [2]

It was built by John Thuesen, who was born near Copenhagen, Denmark, in 1843. He and his family joined the LDS church in 1856, and he immigrated to Utah in 1866. [2]

Copenhagen Capital of Denmark

Copenhagen is the capital and most populous city of Denmark. As of July 2018, the city has a population of 777,218. It forms the core of the wider urban area of Copenhagen and the Copenhagen metropolitan area. Copenhagen is situated on the eastern coast of the island of Zealand; another small portion of the city is located on Amager, and it is separated from Malmö, Sweden, by the strait of Øresund. The Øresund Bridge connects the two cities by rail and road.

Denmark Constitutional monarchy in Europe

Denmark, officially the Kingdom of Denmark, is a Nordic country. Denmark proper, which is the southernmost of the Scandinavian countries, consists of a peninsula, Jutland, and an archipelago of 443 named islands, with the largest being Zealand, Funen and the North Jutlandic Island. The islands are characterised by flat, arable land and sandy coasts, low elevation and a temperate climate. The southernmost of the Scandinavian nations, Denmark lies southwest of Sweden and south of Norway, and is bordered to the south by Germany. The Kingdom of Denmark also includes two autonomous territories in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Denmark has a total area of 42,924 km2 (16,573 sq mi), land area of 42,394 km2 (16,368 sq mi), and the total area including Greenland and the Faroe Islands is 2,210,579 km2 (853,509 sq mi), and a population of 5.8 million.

The house is also associated with Jens Petersen, who was born in Ramsin, Hvidbjerg, Denmark in 1860, and who immigrated to Utah in 1875 with his father Niels and brother Andreas. They were unusual because they were not LDS church members, but apparently were attracted to Utah based on reports from Danish Mormons who had come to Utah earlier. Jens bought this house in 1879, the three lived there, then in 1887 Jens added the second story and also built a store on the property. The store was detached and moved to Main Street in 1936. [2]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Tom Carter; Deborah R. Temme; Fred Aegerter (1981). "Utah State Historical Society Site/Structure Inventory: Thuesen-Petersen House". National Park Service . Retrieved March 13, 2018. With photo from 1981.