Tibet Religious Foundation of His Holiness the Dalai Lama

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The Tibet Religious Foundation of His Holiness the Dalai Lama is one of the offices of the official representation of the 14th Dalai Lama and of the Tibetan government in exile, and a non-profit organization, founded in March 1997 and based in Taipei, Taiwan. [1]

The Office, whose chairman then was Kesang Yangkyi Takla, was open 16 April 1998 in presence of Taiwan President Lee Teng-hui and of Tibetan Minister Sonam Topgyal [2]

The foundation, with Tsegyam Ngawa as its chairman from 2003 to 2008, [3] also serves as a de facto Tibetan representative office in Taiwan. [4]

Since May 2008, Mr. Dawa Tsering has been serving as the chairman of the Foundation.

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References

  1. Staff. "達賴喇嘛西藏宗教基金會: About Foundation". Tibet Religious Foundation of H.H. The Dalai Lama. Retrieved 4 February 2010.(in English)
  2. Dalai Lama opens representative office in Taiwan, AFP, April 16, 1998
  3. "NGAWA TSEGYAM". Tibetanwhoswho.wordpress.com. 31 May 2011. Retrieved 29 October 2018.
  4. "Taiwan Headlines: Foundation leader calls for candidates to speak for Tibet". Government Information Office, Republic of China (Taiwan). 18 March 2008. Archived from the original on 22 December 2012. Retrieved 4 February 2010. Source: Taiwan News.