Lee Teng-hui

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Lee, Teng-hui (1971). Intersectoral Capital Flows in the Economic Development of Taiwan, 1895–1960. Cornell University Press. ISBN   978-0-8014-0650-8. OCLC   1086842416.

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Further reading

  • Matray, James I., ed. East Asia and the United States: an encyclopedia of relations since 1784. Vol. 1 ( Greenwood, 2002) 1:346–347.
Lee Teng-hui
李登輝
Zong Tong Li Deng Hui Xian Sheng Yu Zhao  (Guo Min Da Hui Shi Lu ).jpg
Lee in 1999
President of the Republic of China
In office
13 January 1988 20 May 2000
Political offices
Preceded by Mayor of Taipei
9 June 1978–5 December 1981
Succeeded by
Governor of Taiwan Province
5 December 1981–20 May 1984
Succeeded by
Preceded by Vice President of the Republic of China
20 May 1984–13 January 1988
Succeeded by
Preceded by President of the Republic of China
13 January 1988–20 May 2000
Succeeded by
Party political offices
Preceded by Chairman of the Kuomintang
1988–2000
Succeeded by
New title Kuomintang nominee for President of the Republic of China
1996