Tichnor Rice Dryer and Storage Building

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Tichnor Rice Dryer and Storage Building
Tichnor Rice Dryer and Storage Building.jpg
Tichnor Rice Dryer and Storage Building
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Location1030 AR 44, Tichnor, Arkansas
Area5.9 acres (2.4 ha)
Built1956 (1956)
MPS Cotton and Rice Farm History and Architecture in the Arkansas Delta MPS
NRHP reference # 06000911 [1]
Added to NRHPSeptember 22, 2006

The Tichnor Rice Dryer and Storage Building is a historic rice processing facility at 1030 Arkansas Highway 44 in Tichnor, Arkansas. It is an L-shaped structure, four stories in height, and rests on a concrete pad that is open to truck access on its north, east, southeast, and northwest elevations. It is sided in corrugated metal and has a metal gable roof. Built in 1955 for Woodrow Turner, it is the largest building in the small community, and remains an important facility for local rice growers to dry their crop. [2]

Tichnor is an unincorporated community in Arkansas County, Arkansas, United States. It is the location of the Tichnor Rice Dryer and Storage Building, and is the nearest community to the Roland Site, both listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

The facility was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2006. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

See also

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National Register of Historic Places listings in Arkansas County, Arkansas Wikimedia list article

This is a list of the National Register of Historic Places listings in Arkansas County, Arkansas.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. "NRHP nomination for Ticnor Rice Dryer and Storage Building" (PDF). Arkansas Preservation. Retrieved 2014-10-26.

Coordinates: 34°08′11″N91°15′57″W / 34.136339°N 91.265794°W / 34.136339; -91.265794

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