Tim Murphy (American football coach)

Last updated
Tim Murphy
Tim Murphy FB coach.jpg
Murphy on board the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower in May 2010
Current position
Title Head coach
Team Harvard
Conference Ivy League
Record178–81
Biographical details
Born (1956-10-09) October 9, 1956 (age 64)
Kingston, Massachusetts
Playing career
1974–1977 Springfield
Position(s) Linebacker
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1979 Brown (part-time assistant)
1980Brown (assistant OL)
1981 Lafayette (OL)
1982–1984 Boston University (OL)
1985–1986 Maine (OC)
1987–1988Maine
1989–1993 Cincinnati
1994–present Harvard
Head coaching record
Overall210–126–1
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 Yankee (1987)
9 Ivy (1997, 2001, 2004, 2007–2008, 2011, 2013–2015)

Timothy Lester Murphy (born October 9, 1956) is an American football coach and former player.

Contents

Career

He is currently the head coach for Harvard Football. Murphy has led the program since the 1994 season. He is Harvard's most successful coach.

Murphy served as the head coach at the University of Maine from 1987 to 1988 and at the University of Cincinnati from 1989 to 1993.

Harvard football has recently enjoyed 16 consecutive winning seasons under Murphy's leadership. Murphy's 137 wins at Harvard places him first among head coaches in the program's history. The 2004 squad went 10–0 and was the only undefeated team in Division I-AA that season. He repeated this feat in 2014, with his 10-0 Crimson squad again posting the only undefeated record in FCS that season.

In 2012, Murphy was elected president of the American Football Coaches Association. [1]

Head coaching record

YearTeamOverallConferenceStandingBowl/playoffsCoaches#AP°
Maine Black Bears (Yankee Conference)(1987–1988)
1987 Maine8–46–1T–1st
1988 Maine7–44–4T–3rd
Maine:15–810–5
Cincinnati Bearcats (NCAA Division I-A independent)(1989–1993)
1989 Cincinnati 1–9–1
1990 Cincinnati 1–10
1991 Cincinnati 4–7
1992 Cincinnati 3–8
1993 Cincinnati 8–3
Cincinnati:17–37–1
Harvard Crimson (Ivy League)(1994–present)
1994 Harvard 4–62–5T–7th
1995 Harvard 2–81–68th
1996 Harvard 4–62–5T–6th
1997 Harvard 9–17–01st
1998 Harvard 4–63–4T–5th
1999 Harvard 5–53–45th
2000 Harvard 5–54–3T–3rd
2001 Harvard 9–07–01st19
2002 Harvard 7–36–12nd
2003 Harvard 7–34–3T–2nd
2004 Harvard 10–07–01st13
2005 Harvard 7–35–2T–2nd
2006 Harvard 7–34–33rd
2007 Harvard 8–27–01st21
2008 Harvard 9–16–1T–1st15
2009 Harvard 7–36–12nd
2010 Harvard 7–35–2T–2nd
2011 Harvard 9–17–01st14
2012 Harvard 8–25–22nd
2013 Harvard 9–16–1T–1st
2014 Harvard 10–07–01st14
2015 Harvard 9–16–1T–1st
2016 Harvard 7–35–23rd
2017 Harvard 5–53–4T–5th
2018 Harvard 6–44–33rd
2019 Harvard 4–62–5T–6th
Harvard:178–81124–58
Total:210–126–1
      National championship        Conference title        Conference division title or championship game berth

See also

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References

  1. "Archived copy". Archived from the original on December 5, 2010. Retrieved October 6, 2010.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)