Timeline of Bissau

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The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Bissau, Guinea-Bissau.

Bissau Place in Bissau Autonomous Sector, Guinea-Bissau

Bissau is the capital city of the African Republic of Guinea-Bissau. In 2015, Bissau had a population of 492,004. Bissau is located on the Geba River estuary, off the Atlantic Ocean, and is Guinea-Bissau's largest city, major port, and its administrative and military centre.

Guinea-Bissau country in Western Africa

Guinea-Bissau, officially the Republic of Guinea-Bissau, is a country in West Africa that covers 36,125 square kilometres (13,948 sq mi) with an estimated population of 1,815,698.

Contents

Prior to 20th century

Papel people ethnic group

Papels, also called Moium, Oium, Papei, Pepel or Pelels, are an ethnic group established in Casamance (Senegal), Guinea Bissau and Guinea. Its population in Guinea Bissau is 115,000 (7%), according to the 2012 estimate. They traditionally engaged in hunting and agriculture.

Fortaleza de São José da Amura fort in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau

Fortaleza de São José da Amura is a fort in Bissau, Guinea Bissau.

20th century

Bissau Cathedral church in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau

Bissau Cathedral, also known as Sé Catedral de Nossa Senhora da Candelária is a Catholic cathedral in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau. It is the centre of Roman Catholicism in Guinea-Bissau. The cathedral is the seat of Diocese of Bissau, which was created in 1977. Situated in the downtown area of Bissau, it is noted for its function as a lighthouse. Services are held in Portuguese language.

Estrela Negra de Bissau, usually known simply as Estrela Negra, is a traditional football (soccer) club based in Bissau, Guinea-Bissau.

Portuguese Guinea 1474-1974 Portuguese possession in West Africa

Portuguese Guinea, called the Overseas Province of Guinea from 1951, was a West African colony of Portugal from the late 15th century until 10 September 1974, when it gained independence as Guinea-Bissau.

21st century

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "Guinea-Bissau". Political Chronology of Africa. Political Chronologies of the World. Europa Publications. 2001. pp. 208–213. ISBN   0203409957.
  2. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Peter Karibe Mendy; Richard A. Lobban Jr. (2013). Historical Dictionary of the Republic of Guinea-Bissau (4th ed.). Scarecrow Press. ISBN   978-0-8108-8027-6.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Young 2005.
  4. Milheiro 2009.
  5. "Population of capital city and cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1955. New York: Statistical Office of the United Nations. pp. 171–184.
  6. "Chronology of Catholic Dioceses: Guinea-Bissau". Norway: Roman Catholic Diocese of Oslo . Retrieved 15 September 2017.
  7. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1987). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1985 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 247–289.
  8. "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 2005. United Nations Statistics Division.
  9. 1 2 "Guinea-Bissau: Directory". Africa South of the Sahara 2004. Regional Surveys of the World. Europa Publications. 2004. ISBN   1857431839.
  10. "Rebels and Loyalists In Guinea-Bissau Exchange Shellfire", New York Times, 16 June 1998
  11. Cybriwsky 2013.
  12. Guinea-Bissau's president, army chief killed, Reuters, 2 March 2009
  13. Lydia Polgreen (11 March 2009), "2 slayings in West Africa may signal a new day", New York Times
  14. "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 or more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 2015. United Nations Statistics Division. 2016.
  15. Bissau soldiers control capital in apparent coup, Reuters, 13 April 2012
This article incorporates information from the German Wikipedia, Portuguese Wikipedia, and Spanish Wikipedia.

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