Ubiquitinyl hydrolase 1

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Ubiquitinyl hydrolase 1
Identifiers
EC number 3.4.19.12
CAS number 189642-63-5&title= 86480-67-3, 189642-63-5
Databases
IntEnz IntEnz view
BRENDA BRENDA entry
ExPASy NiceZyme view
KEGG KEGG entry
MetaCyc metabolic pathway
PRIAM profile
PDB structures RCSB PDB PDBe PDBsum

Ubiquitinyl hydrolase 1 (EC 3.4.19.12, ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase, yeast ubiquitin hydrolase) is an enzyme. [1] [2] This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reaction

The Enzyme Commission number is a numerical classification scheme for enzymes, based on the chemical reactions they catalyze. As a system of enzyme nomenclature, every EC number is associated with a recommended name for the respective enzyme.

Catalysis chemical process

Catalysis is the process of increasing the rate of a chemical reaction by adding a substance known as a catalyst, which is not consumed in the catalyzed reaction and can continue to act repeatedly. Because of this, only very small amounts of catalyst are required to alter the reaction rate in principle.

Chemical reaction Process that results in the interconversion of chemical species

A chemical reaction is a process that leads to the chemical transformation of one set of chemical substances to another. Classically, chemical reactions encompass changes that only involve the positions of electrons in the forming and breaking of chemical bonds between atoms, with no change to the nuclei, and can often be described by a chemical equation. Nuclear chemistry is a sub-discipline of chemistry that involves the chemical reactions of unstable and radioactive elements where both electronic and nuclear changes can occur.

Thiol-dependent hydrolysis of ester, thioester, amide, peptide and isopeptide bonds formed by the C-terminal Gly of ubiquitin

This enzyme hydrolyses links to polypeptides smaller than 60 residues faster than those to larger polypeptides.

Related Research Articles

Ubiquitin

Ubiquitin is a small regulatory protein found in most tissues of eukaryotic organisms, i.e. it occurs ubiquitously. It was discovered in 1975 by Gideon Goldstein and further characterized throughout the 1970s and 1980s. Four genes in the human genome code for ubiquitin: UBB, UBC, UBA52 and RPS27A.

Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 is a deubiquitinating enzyme.

Deubiquitinating enzyme

Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), also known as deubiquitinating peptidases, deubiquitinating isopeptidases, deubiquitinases, ubiquitin proteases, ubiquitin hydrolases, ubiquitin isopeptidases, are a large group of proteases that cleave ubiquitin from proteins and other molecules. Ubiquitin is attached to proteins in order to regulate the degradation of proteins via the proteasome and lysosome; coordinate the cellular localisation of proteins; activate and inactivate proteins; and modulate protein-protein interactions. DUBs can reverse these effects by cleaving the peptide or isopeptide bond between ubiquitin and its substrate protein. In humans there are nearly 100 DUB genes, which can be classified into two main classes: cysteine proteases and metalloproteases. The cysteine proteases comprise ubiquitin-specific proteases (USPs), ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs), Machado-Josephin domain proteases (MJDs) and ovarian tumour proteases (OTU). The metalloprotease group contains only the Jab1/Mov34/Mpr1 Pad1 N-terminal+ (MPN+) (JAMM) domain proteases.

An esterase is a hydrolase enzyme that splits esters into an acid and an alcohol in a chemical reaction with water called hydrolysis.

UBE2I protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

SUMO-conjugating enzyme UBC9 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the UBE2I gene. It is also sometimes referred to as "ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2I" or "ubiquitin carrier protein 9", even though these names do not accurately describe its function.

USP5 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin specific peptidase 5 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the USP5 gene.

USP8 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 8 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the USP8 gene.

Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L5 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L5 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the UCHL5 gene.

USP11 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase or Ubiquitin specific protease 11 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the USP11 gene. USP11 belongs to the Ubiquitin specific proteases family (USPs) which is a sub-family of the Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs).USPs are multiple domain proteases and belong to the C19 cysteine proteases sub‒family. Depending on their domain architecture and position there is different homology between the various members. Generally the largest domain is the catalytic domain which harbours the three residue catalytic triad that is included inside conserved motifs. The catalytic domain also contains sequences that are not related with the catalysis function and their role is mostly not clearly understood at present, the length of these sequences varies for each USP and therefore the length of the whole catalytic domain can range from approximately 295 to 850 amino acids. Particular sequences inside the catalytic domain or at the N‒terminus of some USPs have been characterised as UBL and DUSP domains respectively. In some cases, regarding the UBL domains, it has been reported to have a catalysis enhancing function as in the case of USP7. In addition, a so‒called DU domain module is the combination of a DUSP domain followed by a UBL domain separated by a linker and is found in USP11 as well as in USP15 and USP4.

UBE2G1 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 G1 is a protein that in humans is encoded by the UBE2G1 gene.

UCHL3 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase isozyme L3 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the UCHL3 gene.

USP1 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 1 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the USP1 gene.

USP15 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 15 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the USP15 gene.

BAP1 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

BRCA1 associated protein-1 is a deubiquitinating enzyme that in humans is encoded by the BAP1 gene. BAP1 encodes an 80.4 kDa nuclear-localizing protein with a ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase (UCH) domain that gives BAP1 its deubiquitinase activity. Recent studies have shown that BAP1 and its fruit fly homolog, Calypso, are members of the polycomb-group proteins (PcG) of highly conserved transcriptional repressors required for long-term silencing of genes that regulate cell fate determination, stem cell pluripotency, and other developmental processes.

USP48 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 48 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the USP48 gene.

USP13 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 13 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the USP13 gene.

USP20 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 20 is an enzyme that in humans is encoded by the USP20 gene.

C9orf3 protein-coding gene in the species Homo sapiens

Chromosome 9 open reading frame 3 (C9ORF3) also known as aminopeptidase O (APO) is an enzyme which in humans is encoded by the C9ORF3 gene. The protein encoded by this gene is an aminopeptidase which is most closely related in sequence to leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H). APO is a member of the M1 metalloproteinase family.

Ub-AMC

Ubiquitin-AMC is a fluorogenic substrate for a wide range of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), including ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolases (UCHs) and ubiquitin specific proteases (USPs). It is a particularly useful reagent for the study of deubiquitinating activity where detection sensitivity or continuous monitoring of activity is essential.

Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase may refer to:

References

  1. Johnston SC, Larsen CN, Cook WJ, Wilkinson KD, Hill CP (July 1997). "Crystal structure of a deubiquitinating enzyme (human UCH-L3) at 1.8 A resolution". The EMBO Journal. 16 (13): 3787–96. doi:10.1093/emboj/16.13.3787. PMC   1170002 . PMID   9233788.
  2. Wilkinson, K.D.; Rawlings, N.D.; Woessner, J.F. (1998). "Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase". In Barrett, A.J. (ed.). Handbook of Proteolytic Enzymes. London: Academic Press. pp. 470–472.

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