Ugo, conte di Parigi

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Ugo, conte di Parigi (Hugo, Count of Paris) is a tragedia lirica, or tragic opera, in two acts by Gaetano Donizetti. Felice Romani wrote the Italian libretto after Hippolyte-Louis-Florent Bis's Blanche d'Aquitaine. It premiered on 13 March 1832 at La Scala, Milan.

Opera artform combining sung text and musical score in a theatrical setting

Opera is a form of theatre in which music has a leading role and the parts are taken by singers, but is distinct from musical theater. Such a "work" is typically a collaboration between a composer and a librettist and incorporates a number of the performing arts, such as acting, scenery, costume, and sometimes dance or ballet. The performance is typically given in an opera house, accompanied by an orchestra or smaller musical ensemble, which since the early 19th century has been led by a conductor.

Gaetano Donizetti 19th-century Italian opera composer

Domenico Gaetano Maria Donizetti was an Italian composer. Along with Gioachino Rossini and Vincenzo Bellini, Donizetti was a leading composer of the bel canto opera style during the first half of the nineteenth century. Donizetti's close association with the bel canto style was undoubtedly an influence on other composers such as Giuseppe Verdi.

Felice Romani Italian writer

Felice Romani was an Italian poet and scholar of literature and mythology who wrote many librettos for the opera composers Donizetti and Bellini. Romani was considered the finest Italian librettist between Metastasio and Boito.

Contents

Roles

Role Voice type Premiere cast, 13 March 1832
(Conductor: – )
Bianca soprano Giuditta Pasta
Adelia, Bianca's sistersoprano Giulia Grisi
Ugo, Count of Paris tenor Domenico Donzelli
Folco bass Vincenzo Negrini
Luigi V, King of France contralto Clorinda Corradi Pantanelli
Emma mezzo-soprano Felicita Baillou-Hillaret
Knights, soldiers, band

Synopsis

Time: 10th century
Place: Paris [1]

See synopsis on opera-rara.com

Recordings

YearCast
(Bianca, Ugo,
Luigi, Emma)
Conductor,
Opera House and Orchestra
Label [2]
1977 Janet Price,
Maurice Arthur,
Della Jones,
Eiddwen Harrhy
Alun Francis,
New Philharmonia Orchestra and the Geoffrey Mitchell Choir
Audio CD: Opera Rara
Cat: ORC1
2003Doina Dimitriu,
Yasuharu Nakajima,
Sim Tokyurek,
Milijana Nikolic
Antonino Fogliani,
Orchestra and Chorus of the Teatro Donizetti, Bergamo.
Audio CD: Dynamic
Cat: CDS 449/1-2

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References

Notes

  1. Osborne 1994, p. 205
  2. Source for recording information: Recordings of Ugo, conte di Parigi on operadis-opera-discography.org.uk

Cited sources

Charles Thomas Osborne was an Australian journalist, theatre and opera critic, poet and novelist. He was the assistant editor of The London Magazine from 1958 until 1966, literature director of the Arts Council of Great Britain from 1971 until 1986, and chief theatre critic of Daily Telegraph (London) from 1986 to 1991.

International Standard Book Number Unique numeric book identifier

The International Standard Book Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.

Other sources

William Ashbrook was an American musicologist, writer, journalist, and academic. He was perhaps best noted as a historian, researcher and popularizer of the works of Italian opera composer Gaetano Donizetti.