Viceroy of Yun-Gui

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Map of viceroys in Qing Dynasty of China Qing viceroys.png
Map of viceroys in Qing Dynasty of China
Viceroy of Yun-Gui
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese 雲貴總督
Simplified Chinese 云贵总督
Governor-General of Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces and the Surrounding Areas Overseeing Military Affairs and Food Production, Director of Civil Affairs
(full title)
Traditional Chinese 總督雲貴等處地方提督軍務、糧饟兼巡撫事
Simplified Chinese 总督云贵等处地方提督军务、粮饟兼巡抚事
Manchu name
Manchu script ᠶᡡᠨᠨᠠᠨ
ᡤᡠᡳᠵᡝᠣ ᡳ
ᡠᡥᡝᡵᡳ
ᡴᠠᡩᠠᠯᠠᡵᠠ
ᠠᠮᠪᠠᠨ
Romanization yūnnan guijeo i uheri kadalara amban

The Viceroy of Yun-Gui, fully referred to in Chinese as the Governor-General of Yunnan and Guizhou Provinces and the Surrounding Areas Overseeing Military Affairs and Food Production, Director of Civil Affairs, was one of eight regional viceroys in China proper during the Qing dynasty. The Viceroy controlled Yunnan and Guizhou (Kweichow) provinces.

Contents

History

The Viceroy of Yun-Gui was created in 1659, during the reign of the Shunzhi Emperor, as a jinglue (經略; military governor) office before it was converted to a Viceroy.

In 1662, during the reign of the Kangxi Emperor, the Viceroy of Yun-Gui split into the Viceroy of Yunnan and Viceroy of Guizhou, which were respectively headquartered in Qujing and Anshun. Two years later, the two viceroys were merged and the headquarters shifted to Guiyang. In 1673, the Kangxi Emperor restored the Viceroy of Yunnan, with its headquarters in Qujing. Between 1673 and 1681, the Revolt of the Three Feudatories broke out in Yunnan, Guangdong and Fujian provinces. The Viceroy of Yun-Gui was restored in 1680.

In 1728, the Yongzheng Emperor put the Viceroy of Yun-Gui in charge of Guangxi Province as well but reversed the changes in 1734. This system lasted until the fall of the Qing dynasty in 1912.

Starting from 1905, during the reign of the Guangxu Emperor, the Viceroy of Yun-Gui concurrently held the appointment of Provincial Governor of Yunnan.

List of Viceroys of Yun-Gui

#NamePortraitStart of termEnd of termNotes
1 Hong Chengchou
洪承疇
Hong Cheng Chou .jpg 16531658As Viceroy of Huguang, Liangguang and Yun-Gui
Viceroy of Yun-Gui
(1659–1662)
2 Zhao Tingchen
趙廷臣
16591662
Viceroy of Yunnan
(1662–1664)
3 Bian Sanyuan
卞三元
16621664
Viceroy of Guizhou
(1662–1664)
3 Tong Yannian
佟延年
16621662
4 Yang Maoxun
楊茂勛
16621664
Viceroy of Yun-Gui
(1665–1673)
5 Bian Sanyuan
卞三元
16651668
6 Gan Wenkun
甘文焜
16681673
Viceroy of Guizhou
(1673–1680)
7 Ošan
鄂善
16731677
8 Zhou Youde
周有德
Zhou Youde.jpg 16791680
Viceroy of Yun-Gui
(1680–1727)
9 Zhao Liangdong
趙良棟
16801682
10 Cai Yurong
蔡毓榮
16821686
11 Fan Chengxun
范承勛
16861694
12 Ding Sikong
丁思孔
16941694
13 Wang Jiwen
王繼文
16941698
14 Baxi
巴錫
16981705
15 Boihono
貝和諾
17051710
16 Guo Li
郭瑮
17101716
17 Jiang Chenxi
蔣陳錫
17161722
18 Zhang Wenhuan
張文煥
17201722
19 Gao Qizhuo
高其倬
Gao Qi Zhuo .jpg 17221725
20 Iduri
伊都立
17251725
21 Yang Mingshi
楊名時
17251726
22 Ortai
鄂爾泰
E Er Tai .jpg 17261727
Viceroy of Yun-Gui
(including Guangxi)
(1728–1734)
23 Ortai
鄂爾泰
E Er Tai .jpg 17281731
24 Gao Qizhuo
高其倬
Gao Qi Zhuo .jpg 17311733
25 Yengišan
尹繼善
Yin Ji Shan .jpg 17331734
Viceroy of Yun-Gui
(1734–1911)
26 Yengišan
尹繼善
Yin Ji Shan .jpg 17341737
Zhang Guangsi
張廣泗
17361747As Viceroy of Guizhou
27 Qingfu
慶復
17371741
28 Zhang Yunsui
張允隨
17411750
29 Šose
碩色
17501755
30 Aibilong
愛必達
17551756
31 Hengwen
恆文
17561757
32 Aibilong
愛必達
17571761
33 Wu Dashan
吳達善
17611764
34 Liu Zao
劉藻
17641766
35 Yang Yingju
楊應琚
17661767
36 Mingrui
明瑞
17671768
37 Oning
鄂寧
17681768
38 Agui
阿桂
Agui.jpg 17681769
39 Mingde
明德
17691769
40 Asha
阿思哈
17691769
41 Zhangbao
彰寶
17691771
42 Defu
德福
17711771
43 Zhangbao
彰寶
17711774
44 Tuside
圖思德
17741777
45 Li Shiyao
李侍堯
Li Shiyao.jpg 17771780
46 Shuchang
舒常
17801780
47 Fuk'anggan
福康安
Fuk'anggan.jpg 17801781
48 Fugang
富綱
17811786
49 Tecengge
特成額
17861786
50 Fugang
富綱
17861794
51 Fuk'anggan
福康安
Fuk'anggan.jpg 17941795
52 Lebao
勒保
17951797
53 Ohūi
鄂輝
E Hui .jpg 17971798
54 Fugang
富綱
17981799
55 Gioro-Changlin
覺羅長麟
17991799
56 Shulin
書麟
17991800
57 Gioro-Langgan
覺羅琅玕
18001804
58 Bolin
伯麟
18041820
59 Qingbao
慶保
18201820
60 Shi Zhiguang
史致光
18201822
61 Mingshan
明山
18221824
62 Changling
長齡
18241825
63 Zhao Shenzhen
趙慎畛
18251826
64 Ruan Yuan
阮元
Ruan Yuan Xiang .JPG 18261835
65 Ilibu
伊里布
18351839
66 Deng Tingzhen
鄧廷楨
Deng Tingzhen.png 18391839
67 Guiliang
桂良
18391845
68 He Changling
賀長齡
He Chang Ling .jpg 18451847
69 Li Xingyuan
李星沅
Li Xing Yuan .jpg 18471848
70 Lin Zexu
林則徐
Commissioner Lin 2.png 18481849
71 Cheng Yucai
程矞采
18491850
72 Wu Wenrong
吳文鎔
18501852
73 Wu Raodian
羅繞典
18521854
74 Hengchun
恆春
18541857
75 Wu Zhenyu
吳振棫
18571858
76 Zhang Liangji
張亮基
18581860
77 Liu Yuanhao
劉源灝
18601861
78 Fuqing
福清
18611861
79 Pan Duo
潘鐸
18611863
80 Lao Chongguang
勞崇光
Lao Chong Guang .jpg 18631867
81 Zhang Kaisong
張凱嵩
18671868
82 Liu Yuezhao
劉岳昭
18681875
83 Liu Changyou
劉長佑
18751882
84 Cen Yuying
岑毓英
18821889
Tan Junpei
譚鈞培
18891889Acting Viceroy
85 Wang Wenshao
王文韶
Wang Wengshao PXD 156 Vol2.jpg 18891894
86 Songfan
崧蕃
18951900
87 Wei Guangtao
魏光燾
Wei Guangtao.jpg 19001902
88 Ding Zhenduo
丁振鐸
19021906
89 Cen Chunxuan
岑春煊
Cen Chunxuan (1).jpg 19061907
90 Xiliang
錫良
His Excellency Hsi Liang, Viceroy of Manchuria, Manchuria, 1882-ca. 1936 (imp-cswc-GB-237-CSWC47-LS8-046).jpg 19071909
91 Li Jingxi
李經羲
Li Jing Xi .jpg 19091911

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