Viceroy of Huguang

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Map of viceroys in Qing Dynasty of China Qing viceroys.png
Map of viceroys in Qing Dynasty of China
Viceroy of Huguang
Chinese name
Traditional Chinese 湖廣總督
Simplified Chinese 湖广总督
Governor-General of Hubei and Hunan Provinces and the Surrounding Areas; Overseeing Military Affairs, Food Production; Director of Civil Affairs
(full title)
Traditional Chinese 總督湖北湖南等處地方提督軍務、糧饟兼巡撫事
Simplified Chinese 总督湖北湖南等处地方提督军务、粮饷兼巡抚事
Manchu name
Manchu script ᡥᡡᡤᡠᠸᠠᠩ ᠨᡳ
ᡠᡥᡝᡵᡳ
ᡴᠠᡩᠠᠯᠠᡵᠠ
ᠠᠮᠪᠠᠨ
Romanization hūguwang ni uheri kadalara amban

The Viceroy of Huguang, fully referred to in Chinese as the Governor-General of Hubei and Hunan Provinces and the Surrounding Areas; Overseeing Military Affairs, Food Production; Director of Civil Affairs, was one of eight regional Viceroys in China proper during the Qing dynasty. The Viceroy of Huguang had jurisdiction over Hubei and Hunan provinces, which were previously a single province called "Huguang Province" in the Ming dynasty, hence the name "Huguang".

Contents

History

The office was created in 1644 as the "Viceroy of Huguang" during the reign of the Shunzhi Emperor. Its headquarters were in Wuchang (present-day Wuchang District, Wuhan, Hubei). It was abolished in 1668 during the reign of the Kangxi Emperor but was restored in 1670 as the "Viceroy of Chuan-Hu" (川湖總督; "Viceroy of (Si)chuan and Hu(guang)"), with its headquarters in Chongqing. In 1674, the office of Viceroy of Chuan-Hu was split into the Viceroy of Sichuan and Viceroy of Huguang, and had remained as such until 1904. In 1904, during the reign of the Guangxu Emperor, the office of Provincial Governor of Hubei was merged into the office of Viceroy of Huguang.

List of Viceroys of Huguang

#NamePortraitStart of termEnd of termNotes
Viceroy of Huguang
(1645–1904)
1 Luo Xiujin
羅繡錦
16451652As Viceroy of Huguang and Sichuan
2 Zu Zeyuan
祖澤遠
16521656
3 Hong Chengchou
洪承疇
Hong Cheng Chou .jpg 16531658As Viceroy of Huguang, Liangguang and Yun-Gui
4 Hu Quancai
胡全才
16561656
5 Li Zuyin
李祖蔭
16561660
6 Zhang Changgeng
張長庚
16601668
7 Liu Zhaoqi
劉兆麒
16681669As Viceroy of Chuan-Hu
8 Cai Yurong
蔡毓榮
16701682
9 Dong Weiguo
董衛國
16821684
10 Xu Guoxiang
徐國相
16841688
11 Ding Sikong
丁思孔
16881694
12 Wu Tian
吳琠
16941696
13 Li Huizu
李輝祖
16961699
14 Guo Xiu
郭琇
16991703
Nian Xialing
年遐齡
17011704Acting Viceroy
15 Yu Chenglong
喻成龍
17031705
16 Shi Wensheng
石文晟
17051707
17 Guo Shilong
郭世隆
17071710
18 Ehai
鄂海
17101713
19 Elunte
額倫特
17131716
20 Mampi
滿丕
17161722
21 Yang Zongren
楊宗仁
17221725
22 Li Chenglong
李成龍
17251726
23 Yi Zhaoxiong
宜兆熊
17261726
24 Fumin
福敏
17261727
25 Maizhu
邁柱
17271735
26 Zhang Guangsi
張廣泗
17351735
27 Shi Yizhi
史貽直
17351737
28 Depei
德沛
17371739
29 Bandi
班第
Meritorious Officers Paintings of Ziguang Ge-Bandi.JPG 17391740
30 Nasutu
那蘇圖
17401741
31 Sun Jiagan
孫嘉淦
17411743
32 Arsai
阿爾賽
17431744
33 Omida
鄂彌達
17441746
34 Saileng'e
賽楞額
17461748
35 Xinzhu
新柱
17481749
36 Yongxing
永興
17491750
37 Arigun
阿里袞
Arigun.jpg 17501751
38 Yongchang
永常
17511753
39 Kaitai
開泰
17531755
40 Šose
碩色
17551759
41 Suchang
蘇昌
17591761
42 Aibida
愛必達
17611763
Chen Hongmou
陳宏謀
Chen Hong Mou .jpg 17631763Acting Viceroy
43 Li Shiyao
李侍堯
Li Shiyao.jpg 17631764
44 Wu Dashan
吳達善
17641766
45 Liu Zao
劉藻
17661766
46 Dingchang
定長
17661768
Gao Jin
高晉
17681768Acting Viceroy
47 Wu Dashan
吳達善
17681771
48 Fuming'an
富明安
17711772
49 Haiming
海明
17721772
50 Fulehun
富勒渾
17721773
Chen Huizu
陳輝祖
17721773Acting Viceroy
51 Wenshou
文綬
17731776
52 Fulehun
富勒渾
17761777
53 Sanbao
三寶
17771779
54 Tuside
圖思德
17791779
55 Fulehun
富勒渾
17791780
56 Shuchang
舒常
17801784
57 Tecengge
特成額
17841786
58 Bi Yuan
畢沅
Bi Yuan .jpg 17861786
59 Li Shiyao
李侍堯
Li Shiyao.jpg 17861787
60 Changqing
常青
17871787
61 Shuchang
舒常
17871788
63 Bi Yuan
畢沅
Bi Yuan .jpg 17881794
64 Funing
福寧
17941795
65 Bi Yuan
畢沅
Bi Yuan .jpg 17951797
66 Lebao
勒保
17971798
67 Jing'an
景安
17981799
68 Wesibu
倭什布
17991800
70 Jiang Sheng
姜晟
Jiang Cheng .jpg 18001800
71 Shulin
書麟
18001801
72 Wesibu
倭什布
18011801
73 Wu Xiongguang
吳熊光
18011805
74 Bailing
百齡
18051805
75 Quanbao
全保
18051806
76Wang Zhiyi
汪志伊
18061810
77 Ma Huiyu
馬慧裕
18101816
78 Sun Yuting
孫玉庭
18161816
79 Ruan Yuan
阮元
Ruan Yuan Xiang .JPG 18161817
80 Qingbao
慶保
18171820
81 Zhang Yinghan
張映漢
18201820
82 Chen Ruolin
陳若霖
Chen Ruo Lin .jpg 18201822
83 Li Hongbin
李鴻賓
18221826
84 Songfu
嵩孚
18261830
Yang Yizeng
楊懌曾
18301830Acting Viceroy
85 Lu Kun
盧坤
18301832
86 Nergingge
訥爾經額
18321837
87 Lin Zexu
林則徐
Commissioner Lin 2.png February 1837December 1838
88 Zhou Tianjue
周天爵
December 1838December 1840
89 Guiliang
桂良
June 1839December 1839
90 Yutai
裕泰
December 1839December 1851
91 Cheng Yucai
程矞采
December 1851October 1852
Xu Guangjin
徐廣縉
October 1852February 1853Acting Viceroy
Zhang Liangji
張亮基
February 1853September 1853
92 Wu Wenrong
吳文鎔
September 1853February 1854
93 Taiyong
台湧
March 1854July 1854
94 Yang Pei
楊霈
October 1854June 1855
95 Guanwen
官文
June 1855February 1867
Tan Tingxiang
譚廷襄
18661866Acting Viceroy
96 Li Hongzhang
李鴻章
Li Hung Chang in 1896.jpg February 1867August 1870
Li Hanzhang
李瀚章
18671868Acting Viceroy
Guo Boyin
郭柏蔭
18681869Acting Viceroy
97 Li Hanzhang
李瀚章
August 1870April 1882
Weng Tongjue
翁同爵
Weng Tong Jue .jpg 18751876Acting Viceroy
98 Tu Zongying
塗宗瀛
April 1882June 1883
Bian Baodi
卞寶第
June 1883April 1885Acting Viceroy
Yulu
裕祿
Yulu.jpg April 1885August 1889Acting Viceroy
99 Zhang Zhidong
張之洞
Zhang Zhi Dong Zhao Fu Zhao .jpg August 1889November 1894
100 Tan Jixun
譚繼洵
November 1894January 1896
101 Zhang Zhidong
張之洞
Zhang Zhi Dong Zhao Fu Zhao .jpg January 1896November 1902
Duanfang
端方
Duan Fang.jpg November 19021904Acting Viceroy
Viceroy of Huguang and Provincial Governor of Hubei
(1904–1911)
102 Zhang Zhidong
張之洞
Zhang Zhi Dong Zhao Fu Zhao .jpg 1904August 1907
103 Zhao Erxun
趙爾巽
Zhao Erxun.jpg August 1907March 1908
104 Chen Kuilong
陳夔龍
Chen Kuilong.jpg March 1908October 1909
Ruicheng
瑞澂
October 1909October 1911Acting Viceroy
Yuan Shikai
袁世凱
YuanShika Colour.jpg 14 October 1911Never assumed office
Wei Guangtao
魏光燾
Wei Guangtao.jpg 1911Never assumed office
Wang Shizhen
王士珍
WangShizhen.jpg 2 November 1911Never assumed office
Duan Zhigui
段芝貴
Duanzhigui.jpg 14 November 1911Never assumed office
Duan Qirui
段祺瑞
DuanQirui.jpg 17 November 1911Never assumed office

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References