Watertown, Tennessee

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Watertown, Tennessee
Watertown tennessee city hall.jpg
Watertown Town Hall
Wilson County Tennessee Incorporated and Unincorporated areas Watertown Highlighted 4778320.svg
Location of Watertown in Wilson County, Tennessee.
Coordinates: 36°6′0″N86°8′14″W / 36.10000°N 86.13722°W / 36.10000; -86.13722 Coordinates: 36°6′0″N86°8′14″W / 36.10000°N 86.13722°W / 36.10000; -86.13722
Country United States
State Tennessee
County Wilson
Settled1780 [1]
Incorporated1905 [2]
Named for Wilson L. Waters, founder [1]
Area
  Total1.3 sq mi (3.2 km2)
  Land1.3 sq mi (3.2 km2)
  Water0.0 sq mi (0.0 km2)
Elevation
653 ft (199 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total1,477
  Estimate 
(2018) [3]
1,515
  Density1,083.9/sq mi (418.5/km2)
Time zone UTC-6 (Central (CST))
  Summer (DST) UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
37184
Area code(s) 615
FIPS code 47-78320 [4]
GNIS feature ID1304411 [5]

Watertown is a town located in Wilson County, Tennessee. The population was 1,358 at the 2000 census and 1,477 at the 2010 census. It is located southeast of Lebanon, and Northwest of Smithville.

Wilson County, Tennessee County in the United States

Wilson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 113,993. Its county seat is Lebanon. The largest city is Mt. Juliet.

Lebanon, Tennessee City in Tennessee, United States

Lebanon is the county seat of Wilson County, Tennessee, United States.

Smithville, Tennessee City in Tennessee, United States

Smithville is a city in DeKalb County, Tennessee, United States. The population was 4,530 at the 2010 census, up from 3,994 at the 2000 census. It is the county seat of DeKalb County. Smithville is home to the Smithville Fiddler's Jamboree, which it has hosted annually since 1972.

Contents

History

Prior to the town's establishment, the land was a Revolutionary War grant to Colonel Archibald Lytle and his brother William. [1]

American Revolutionary War War between Great Britain and the Thirteen Colonies, which won independence as the United States of America

The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was an 18th-century war between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies which declared independence as the United States of America.

Circa 1790, the grandparents of Watertown's founder, Wilson L. Waters, moved into the area. In 1845, the post office moved from nearby Three Forks to Wilson's store. Waters expanded his operations with a sawmill, gristmill and blacksmith shop. Waters' 400-acre (1.6 km2) farm eventually became Watertown. [1]

The Nashville and Knoxville Railroad built a depot in Watertown in 1885, making it the hub of business in the area. The increased business led to a doubling of the village's size.

The Tennessee Central Railway was founded in 1884 as the Nashville and Knoxville Railroad by Alexander S. Crawford. It was an attempt to open up a rail route from the coal and minerals of East Tennessee to the markets of the midstate, a service which many businessmen felt was not being adequately provided by the existing railroad companies. They also wanted to ship coal and iron ore to the Northeastern US over the Cincinnati Southern Railway, which was leased to the Southern and operated as the Cincinnati, New Orleans and Texas Pacific Railway [CNOTP], through their Cincinnati gateway. The N&K was only completed between Lebanon, where it connected to a Nashville, Chattanooga and St. Louis Railway branch from Nashville, and Standing Stone.

In 1903, a fire swept through the wood structures of the village, destroying many businesses. During the recovery period following the fire, a town square surrounded by brick building was laid out, creating the core of the current city of Watertown. [1]

Geography

Watertown is located at 36°06′00″N86°08′14″W / 36.100039°N 86.137102°W / 36.100039; -86.137102 (36.100039, -86.137102). [6]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2), all land.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1910 517
1920 93380.5%
1930 928−0.5%
1940 908−2.2%
1950 9332.8%
1960 919−1.5%
1970 1,06115.5%
1980 1,30022.5%
1990 1,250−3.8%
2000 1,3588.6%
2010 1,4778.8%
Est. 20181,515 [3] 2.6%
Sources: [7] [8]

As of the census [4] of 2000, there were 1,358 people, 542 households, and 377 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,083.9 people per square mile (419.5/km2). There were 605 housing units at an average density of 482.9 per square mile (186.9/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 91.24% White, 6.11% African American, 0.37% Native American, 0.07% Asian, 0.66% from other races, and 1.55% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.25% of the population.

First Baptist Church in Watertown First baptist church watertown tennessee.jpg
First Baptist Church in Watertown

There were 542 households out of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.5% were married couples living together, 13.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.3% were non-families. 28.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.7% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 28.3% from 25 to 44, 21.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.8 males.[ citation needed ]

The median income for a household in the city was $35,662, and the median income for a family was $41,484. Males had a median income of $30,263 versus $22,500 for females. The per capita income for the city was $17,008. About 9.2% of families and 11.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.2% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.[ citation needed ]

Arts and Entertainment

Watertown Historic District Downtown watertown tennessee.jpg
Watertown Historic District

Music

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 History of Watertown, Watertown official website. Retrieved: 1 March 2013.
  2. Tennessee Blue Book , 2005-2006, pp. 618-625.
  3. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates" . Retrieved August 4, 2019.
  4. 1 2 "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  5. "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  7. "Census of Population and Housing: Decennial Censuses". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2012-03-04.
  8. "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 11 December 2013.
  9. "Media coverage of the Stardust Drive-In Theatre". Stardust Drive-In Theatre. Retrieved February 5, 2007.
  10. "Passenger Excursions". Tennessee Central Railway Museum. 2007. Retrieved February 5, 2007.
  11. watertownjazz.com
  12. "Tom T. Hall ~ Homegrown". Mercury - Nashville. July 14, 2003. Retrieved February 5, 2007.
  13. "Garth Brooks Production Takes Over Wilson County, TN Town". PlanetGarth.com. October 1, 2001. Retrieved February 5, 2007.

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