Watkins House (Keysville, Virginia)

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Watkins House

Watkins House near Keysville.jpg

Distant view of the eastern side
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Location 3115 Briery Rd., Keysville, Virginia
Coordinates 37°4′27″N78°30′24″W / 37.07417°N 78.50667°W / 37.07417; -78.50667 Coordinates: 37°4′27″N78°30′24″W / 37.07417°N 78.50667°W / 37.07417; -78.50667
Area 15.1 acres (6.1 ha)
Built c. 1830 (1830)
Architectural style Greek Revival
NRHP reference # 04000549 [1]
VLR # 019-5168
Significant dates
Added to NRHP May 27, 2004
Designated VLR March 17, 2004 [2]

Watkins House, also known as Shoo-Crymes Place, Crymes Place, and Bonis Est Farm, is a historic farmhouse located near Keysville, Charlotte County, Virginia. It was built c1830, and is a two-story, three bay, frame I-house in a transitional Federal / Greek Revival style. It has a rear wing and features a pair of tall hexagonal brick chimney stacks. Also on the property are a contributing a tobacco barn, a wagon shed / granary, an equipment or storage building, a hay barn / stable, and a chicken coop. [3]

Keysville, Virginia Town in Virginia, United States

Keysville is a town in Charlotte County, Virginia, United States. The population was 832 at the 2010 census. One of two branches of Southside Virginia Community College is in Keysville. The surrounding area has tobacco and mixed farming.

Charlotte County, Virginia County in the United States

Charlotte County is a United States county located in the south central part of the Commonwealth of Virginia. Its county seat is the town of Charlotte Court House. As of the 2010 census, the county population was 12,586. Charlotte County is predominately rural with a population density of only 26.5 persons per square mile.

I-house

The I-house is a vernacular house type, popular in the United States from the colonial period onward. The I-house was so named in the 1930s by Fred Kniffen, a cultural geographer at Louisiana State University who was a specialist in folk architecture. He identified and analyzed the type in his 1936 study of Louisiana house types. He chose the name "I-house" because of its common occurrence in the rural farm areas of Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, all states beginning with the letter "I". He did not use the term to imply that this house type originated in, or was restricted to, those three states. It is also referred to as Plantation Plain style.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2004. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. "Virginia Landmarks Register". Virginia Department of Historic Resources. Retrieved 5 June 2013.
  3. Patricia L. Renn and Thomas O. Renn (June 2003). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Watkins House" (PDF). Virginia Historic Landmarks Commission. and Accompanying four photos