1008

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1008 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1008
MVIII
Ab urbe condita 1761
Armenian calendar 457
ԹՎ ՆԾԷ
Assyrian calendar 5758
Balinese saka calendar 929–930
Bengali calendar 415
Berber calendar 1958
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1552
Burmese calendar 370
Byzantine calendar 6516–6517
Chinese calendar 丁未(Fire  Goat)
3704 or 3644
     to 
戊申年 (Earth  Monkey)
3705 or 3645
Coptic calendar 724–725
Discordian calendar 2174
Ethiopian calendar 1000–1001
Hebrew calendar 4768–4769
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1064–1065
 - Shaka Samvat 929–930
 - Kali Yuga 4108–4109
Holocene calendar 11008
Igbo calendar 8–9
Iranian calendar 386–387
Islamic calendar 398–399
Japanese calendar Kankō 5
(寛弘5年)
Javanese calendar 910–911
Julian calendar 1008
MVIII
Korean calendar 3341
Minguo calendar 904 before ROC
民前904年
Nanakshahi calendar −460
Seleucid era 1319/1320 AG
Thai solar calendar 1550–1551
Tibetan calendar 阴火羊年
(female Fire-Goat)
1134 or 753 or −19
     to 
阳土猴年
(male Earth-Monkey)
1135 or 754 or −18
Coin of Olof Skotkonung (c. 980-1022) Olaf Scotking of Sweden coin c 1030.jpg
Coin of Olof Skötkonung (c. 980–1022)

Year 1008 ( MVIII ) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

By place

Japan

Murasaki Shikibu starts to write her diary (Murasaki Shikibu Nikki)

42th Birthday of Fujiwara no Michinaga - it is a great celebration because he is the father-in-law of the emperor

17 March: Death of Retired Emperor Kazan

25 May: Death of Imperial Princess Bishi (second daughter of Emperor Ichijo) - after the death of her mother, she was raised by her stepmother, Empress Shoshi but has a weak health

12 October: Empress Shoshi give birth to Prince Atsuhira - this means that the blood of Michinaga will sit on the throne

13 November: Kamo Special Festival - On this occasion, Lady Shikibu is given the name Murasaki from a famous court poet, Fujiwara no Kinto

Europe

England

  • King Æthelred II (the Unready) orders a new fleet of warships built, organised on a national scale. It is a huge undertaking, but is completed the following year. [1]

Arabian Empire

By topic

Religion

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

Fujiwara no Michinaga

Fujiwara no Michinaga was a Japanese statesman. The Fujiwara clan's control over Japan and its politics reached its zenith under his leadership.

Year 1000 (M) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. In the proleptic Gregorian calendar, it was a non-leap century year starting on Wednesday. It was also the last year of the 10th century as well as the last year of the 1st millennium of the Christian Era ending on December 31, but the first year of the 1000s decade.

The 990s decade ran from January 1, 990, to December 31, 999.

Year 1001 (MI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. It is the first year of the 11th century and the 2nd millennium.

1007 Calendar year

Year 1007 (MVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1009 Calendar year

Year 1009 (MIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1016 Calendar year

Year 1016 (MXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1028 Calendar year

Year 1028 (MXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

995 Calendar year

Year 995 (CMXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1010 (MX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1015 Calendar year

Year in topic Year 1015 (MXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

The 1010s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1010, and ended on December 31, 1019.

1025 Calendar year

Year 1025 (MXXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1024 Calendar year

Year 1024 (MXXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Murasaki Shikibu Japanese novelist and poet

Murasaki Shikibu was a Japanese novelist, poet and lady-in-waiting at the Imperial court in the Heian period. She is best known as the author of The Tale of Genji, widely considered to be one of the world's first novels, written in Japanese between about 1000 and 1012. Murasaki Shikibu is a descriptive name; her personal name is unknown, but she may have been Fujiwara no Kaoriko, who was mentioned in a 1007 court diary as an imperial lady-in-waiting.

Emperor Ichijō Emperor of Japan

Emperor Ichijō was the 66th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

<i>The Diary of Lady Murasaki</i>

The Diary of Lady Murasaki is the title given to a collection of diary fragments written by the 11th-century Japanese Heian era lady-in-waiting and writer Murasaki Shikibu. It is written in kana, then a newly developed writing system for vernacular Japanese, more common among women, who were generally unschooled in Chinese. Unlike modern diaries or journals, 10th-century Heian diaries tend to emphasize important events more than ordinary day-to-day life and do not follow a strict chronological order. The work includes vignettes, waka poems, and an epistolary section written in the form of a long letter.

The 1020s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1020, and ended on December 31, 1029.

Empress Shōshi

Fujiwara no Shōshi, also known as Jōtōmon-in (上東門院), the eldest daughter of Fujiwara no Michinaga, was Empress of Japan from c. 1000 to c. 1011. Her father sent her to live in the Emperor Ichijō's harem at age 12. Because of his power, influence and political machinations she quickly achieved the status of second empress. As empress she was able to surround herself with a court of talented and educated ladies-in-waiting such as Murasaki Shikibu, author of The Tale of Genji.

Genji Monogatari: Sennen no Nazo is a 2011 Japanese film based on the epic early 11th century Japanese story, The Tale of Genji.

References

  1. Stenton, F.M. (1971). Anglo-Saxon England, pp. 381–384. The Oxford History of England. Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN   019-280-1392.
  2. Quoted in Mats G. Larsson, Götarnas riken: Upptäcktsfärder till Sveriges enande. Stockholm: Atlantis, 2002, p. 185.
  3. According to the "Annals of Magdeburg" (c. 1170) and some other sources.