1008

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1008 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1008
MVIII
Ab urbe condita 1761
Armenian calendar 457
ԹՎ ՆԾԷ
Assyrian calendar 5758
Balinese saka calendar 929–930
Bengali calendar 415
Berber calendar 1958
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1552
Burmese calendar 370
Byzantine calendar 6516–6517
Chinese calendar 丁未(Fire  Goat)
3704 or 3644
     to 
戊申年 (Earth  Monkey)
3705 or 3645
Coptic calendar 724–725
Discordian calendar 2174
Ethiopian calendar 1000–1001
Hebrew calendar 4768–4769
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1064–1065
 - Shaka Samvat 929–930
 - Kali Yuga 4108–4109
Holocene calendar 11008
Igbo calendar 8–9
Iranian calendar 386–387
Islamic calendar 398–399
Japanese calendar Kankō 5
(寛弘5年)
Javanese calendar 910–911
Julian calendar 1008
MVIII
Korean calendar 3341
Minguo calendar 904 before ROC
民前904年
Nanakshahi calendar −460
Seleucid era 1319/1320 AG
Thai solar calendar 1550–1551
Tibetan calendar 阴火羊年
(female Fire-Goat)
1134 or 753 or −19
     to 
阳土猴年
(male Earth-Monkey)
1135 or 754 or −18
Coin of Olof Skotkonung (c. 980-1022) Olaf Scotking of Sweden coin c 1030.jpg
Coin of Olof Skötkonung (c. 980–1022)

Year 1008 ( MVIII ) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year starting on Thursday is any year with 366 days that begins on Thursday 1 January, and ends on Friday 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are DC, such as the years 1880, 1920, 1948, 1976, 2004, 2032, 2060, and 2088, in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1988, 2016, and 2044 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in February and August.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Europe

Olaf II of Norway king of Norway

Olaf II Haraldsson, later known as St. Olaf, was King of Norway from 1015 to 1028. He was posthumously given the title Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae and canonised at Nidaros (Trondheim) by Bishop Grimkell, one year after his death in the Battle of Stiklestad on 29 July 1030. His remains were enshrined in Nidaros Cathedral, built over his burial site. His sainthood encouraged the widespread adoption of the Christian religion among the Vikings / Norsemen in Scandinavia.

Kingdom of Norway (872–1397)

The term Norwegian Realm and the Old Kingdom of Norway, refer to the Kingdom of Norway's peak of power at the 13th century after a long period of civil war before 1240. The kingdom was a loosely unified nation including the territory of modern-day Norway, modern-day Swedish territory of Jämtland, Herjedalen, Ranrike and Idre and Särna, as well as Norway's overseas possessions which had been settled by Norwegian seafarers for centuries before being annexed or incorporated into the kingdom as 'tax territories'. To the North, Norway also bordered extensive tax territories on the mainland. Norway, whose expansionalism starts from the very foundation of the Kingdom in 872, reached the peak of its power in the years between 1240 and 1319.

Baltic Sea A sea in Northern Europe bounded by the Scandinavian Peninsula, the mainland of Europe, and the Danish islands

The Baltic Sea is a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean, enclosed by Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Latvia, Lithuania, Sweden, Germany, Poland, and Russia.

England

  • King Æthelred II (the Unready) orders to build a new fleet of warships, organised on a national scale. It is a huge undertaking but is complete the following year. [1]
Æthelred the Unready 10th and 11th-century King of England

Æthelred II, known as the Unready, was King of the English from 978 to 1013 and again from 1014 until his death. His epithet does not derive from the modern word "unready", but rather from the Old English unræd ; it is a pun on his name, which means "well advised".

Arabian Empire

Al-Hakim bi-Amr Allah caliph

Abū ʿAlī Manṣūr, better known by his regnal title al-Ḥākim bi-Amr Allāh, was the sixth Fatimid caliph and 16th Ismaili imam (996–1021). Al-Hakim is an important figure in a number of Shia Ismaili religions, such as the world's 15 million Nizaris, in addition to the 2 million Druze of the Levant whose eponymous founder ad-Darazi proclaimed him as the incarnation of God in 1018.

Tribute wealth that one party gives to another as a sign of respect or of submission or allegiance

A tribute (/ˈtrɪbjuːt/) is wealth, often in kind, that a party gives to another as a sign of respect or, as was often the case in historical contexts, of submission or allegiance. Various ancient states exacted tribute from the rulers of land which the state conquered or otherwise threatened to conquer. In case of alliances, lesser parties may pay tribute to more powerful parties as a sign of allegiance and often in order to finance projects that would benefit both parties. To be called "tribute" a recognition by the payer of political submission to the payee is normally required; the large sums, essentially protection money, paid by the later Roman and Byzantine Empires to barbarian peoples to prevent them attacking imperial territory, would not usually be termed "tribute" as the Empire accepted no inferior political position. Payments by a superior political entity to an inferior one, made for various purposes, are described by terms including "subsidy".

Emperor Zhenzong emperor of the Song Dynasty

Emperor Zhenzong of Song, personal name Zhao Heng, was the third emperor of the Song dynasty in China. He reigned from 997 to his death in 1022. His personal name was originally Zhao Dechang, but was changed to Zhao Yuanxiu in 983, Zhao Yuankan in 986, and finally Zhao Heng in 995. He was the third son of his predecessor, Emperor Taizong, and was succeeded by his sixth son, Emperor Renzong.

By topic

Religion

Olof Skötkonung King of Sweden

Olof Skötkonung was King of Sweden, son of Eric the Victorious and, according to Icelandic sources, Sigrid the Haughty. He succeeded his father in c. 995. He stands at the threshold of recorded history, since he is the first Swedish ruler about whom there is substantial knowledge. He is regarded as the first king known to have ruled both the Swedes and the Geats.

Sweden constitutional monarchy in Northern Europe

Sweden, officially the Kingdom of Sweden, is a Scandinavian Nordic country in Northern Europe. It borders Norway to the west and north and Finland to the east, and is connected to Denmark in the southwest by a bridge-tunnel across the Öresund, a strait at the Swedish-Danish border. At 450,295 square kilometres (173,860 sq mi), Sweden is the largest country in Northern Europe, the third-largest country in the European Union and the fifth largest country in Europe by area. Sweden has a total population of 10.2 million of which 2.4 million has a foreign background. It has a low population density of 22 inhabitants per square kilometre (57/sq mi). The highest concentration is in the southern half of the country.

Baptism Christian rite of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water

Baptism is a Christian rite of admission and adoption, almost invariably with the use of water, into Christianity. The synoptic gospels recount that John the Baptist baptised Jesus. Baptism is considered a sacrament in most churches, and as an ordinance in others. Baptism is also called christening, although some reserve the word "christening" for the baptism of infants. It has also given its name to the Baptist churches and denominations.

Births

May 4 is the 124th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 241 days remaining until the end of the year.

Henry I of France King of the Franks from 1031 to his death

Henry I was King of the Franks from 1031 to 1060, the third from the House of Capet. The royal demesne of France reached its smallest size during his reign, and for this reason he is often seen as emblematic of the weakness of the early Capetians. This is not entirely agreed upon, however, as other historians regard him as a strong but realistic king, who was forced to conduct a policy mindful of the limitations of the French monarchy.

Kingdom of France kingdom in Western Europe from 843 to 1791

The Kingdom of France was a medieval and early modern monarchy in Western Europe. It was one of the most powerful states in Europe and a great power since the Late Middle Ages and the Hundred Years' War. It was also an early colonial power, with possessions around the world.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

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Year 742 (DCCXLII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 742 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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Year 785 (DCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The article denomination 785 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. It is still used today in this manner.

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Year 820 (DCCCXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 864 (DCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

967 Year

Year 967 (CMLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1002 Year

Year 1002 (MII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

850 Year

For codepage, see CP850. Year 850 (DCCCL) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

995 Year

Year 995 (CMXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1015 Year

Year in topic Year 1015 (MXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1060 Year

Year 1060 (MLX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

930 Year

Year 930 (CMXXX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

870 Year

Year 870 (DCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1027 Year

Year 1027 (MXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

994 Year

Year 994 (CMXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1038 Year

Year 1038 (MXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

880 Year

Year 880 (DCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

988 Year

Year 988 (CMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

985 Year

Year 985 (CMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

960 Year

Year 960 (CMLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

940 Year

Year 940 (CMXL) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Stenton, F.M. (1971). Anglo-Saxon England, pp. 381–384. The Oxford History of England. Oxford: Clarendon Press. ISBN   019-280-1392.
  2. Quoted in Mats G. Larsson, Götarnas riken: Upptäcktsfärder till Sveriges enande. Stockholm: Atlantis, 2002, p. 185.
  3. According to the "Annals of Magdeburg" (c. 1170) and some other sources.