1919 in New Zealand

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1919 in New Zealand

Decades:
See also:

The following lists events that happened during 1919 in New Zealand .

1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1919th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 919th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 20th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1919, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

New Zealand Constitutional monarchy in Oceania

New Zealand is a sovereign island country in the southwestern Pacific Ocean. The country geographically comprises two main landmasses—the North Island, and the South Island —and around 600 smaller islands. New Zealand is situated some 2,000 kilometres (1,200 mi) east of Australia across the Tasman Sea and roughly 1,000 kilometres (600 mi) south of the Pacific island areas of New Caledonia, Fiji, and Tonga. Because of its remoteness, it was one of the last lands to be settled by humans. During its long period of isolation, New Zealand developed a distinct biodiversity of animal, fungal, and plant life. The country's varied topography and its sharp mountain peaks, such as the Southern Alps, owe much to the tectonic uplift of land and volcanic eruptions. New Zealand's capital city is Wellington, while its most populous city is Auckland.

Contents

Incumbents

Regal and viceregal

Governor-General of New Zealand representative of the monarch of New Zealand

The Governor-General of New Zealand is the viceregal representative of the monarch of New Zealand, currently Queen Elizabeth II. As the Queen is shared equally with the 15 other Commonwealth realms, and resides in the United Kingdom, she, on the advice of her prime minister, appoints a governor-general to carry out most of her constitutional and ceremonial duties within the Realm of New Zealand. Once in office, the governor-general maintains direct contact with the Queen, wherever she may be at the time.

Arthur Foljambe, 2nd Earl of Liverpool viceroy

Arthur William de Brito Savile Foljambe, 2nd Earl of Liverpool,, styled Viscount Hawkesbury between 1905 and 1907, was a British Liberal politician, the 16th and last Governor of New Zealand, and the first Governor-General of New Zealand.

Government

The 19th New Zealand Parliament concludes. The election held in November sees the Reform Party returned with an increased majority (47 of the 80 seats). Women are eligible to stand for Parliament for the first time. [2]

19th New Zealand Parliament

The 19th New Zealand Parliament was a term of the New Zealand Parliament. It opened on 24 June 1915, following the 1914 election. It was dissolved on 27 November 1919 in preparation for 1919 election.

Speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives

In New Zealand, the Speaker of the House of Representatives is the individual who chairs the country's elected legislative body, the New Zealand House of Representatives. The individual who holds the position is elected by members of the House from among their number in the first session after each general election. The current Speaker is Trevor Mallard, who was initially elected on 7 November 2017.

Frederic Lang New Zealand politician

Sir Frederic William Lang was a New Zealand politician, initially an independent conservative, then from 1914 a member of the Reform Party. He was the eighth Speaker of the House of Representatives, from 1913 to 1922.

Prime Minister of New Zealand head of the New Zealand government

The Prime Minister of New Zealand is the head of government of New Zealand. The incumbent Prime Minister, Jacinda Ardern, leader of the New Zealand Labour Party, took office on 26 October 2017.

Parliamentary opposition

Leader of the Opposition (New Zealand) parliamentary position of the Parliament of New Zealand

In New Zealand, the Leader of the Opposition is the politician who commands the support of the Official Opposition. The Leader of the Opposition by convention leads the largest party not supporting the government: this is usually the parliamentary leader of the second largest caucus in the House of Representatives. In the debating chamber the Leader of the Opposition sits directly opposite the Prime Minister.

Joseph Ward New Zealand politician

Sir Joseph George Ward of Wellington, 1st Baronet, was a New Zealand politician who served as the 17th Prime Minister of New Zealand from 1906 to 1912 and from 1928 to 1930. He was a dominant figure in the Liberal and United ministries of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

The New Zealand Liberal Party was the first organised political party in New Zealand. It governed from 1891 until 1912. The Liberal strategy was to create a large class of small land-owning farmers who supported Liberal ideals, by buying large tracts of Māori land and selling it to small farmers on credit. The Liberal Government also established the basis of the later welfare state, with old age pensions, developed a system for settling industrial disputes, which was accepted by both employers and trade unions. In 1893 it extended voting rights to women, making New Zealand the first country in the world to enact universal female suffrage.

Main centre leaders

Mayor of Auckland head of the Auckland Council

The Mayor of Auckland is the directly elected head of the Auckland Council, the local government authority for the Auckland Region in New Zealand, which it controls as a unitary authority. The position exists since October 2010 after the amalgamation of various territorial authorities. The mayor is supported by a deputy mayor.

James Gunson New Zealand politician

Sir James Henry Gunson was a New Zealand businessman and Mayor of Auckland City from 1915 to 1925. He was knighted in 1924.

The Mayor of Hamilton, New Zealand is the head of the municipal government of Hamilton, New Zealand, and presides over the Hamilton City Council.

Events

Arts and literature

See 1919 in art, 1919 in literature, Category:1919 books

Music

See: 1919 in music

Film

See: Category:1919 film awards, 1919 in film, List of New Zealand feature films, Cinema of New Zealand, Category:1919 films

Sport

Chess

Cricket

Golf

Horse racing

Harness racing

Lawn bowls

The national outdoor lawn bowls championships are held in Auckland. [15]

Rugby union

Soccer

Provincial league champions: [17]

Rugby league

Births

January–February

March–April

May–June

July–August

September–October

November–December

Deaths

January–March

  • 21 January – Thomas Thompson, politician (born 1832)
  • 22 January – Carrick Paul, World War I flying ace (born 1893)
  • 2 February – Charles Begg, surgeon, army health administrator (born 1879)
  • 7 February – Donald Reid, farmer, landowner, businessman, politician (born 1833)
  • 13 February – William Temple, soldier, Victoria Cross recipient (born 1833)
  • 18 February – Searby Buxton, politician (born 1832)
  • 19 February – William Tucker, soldier, farmer, politician, mayor of Gisborne (1887–88) (born 1843)
  • 24 February – Alfred Fraser, politician (born 1862)
  • 18 March – Isabella Siteman, farmer, philanthropist (born c.1842)
  • 25 March – Harry Burnand, engineer, sawmiller (born 1850)

April–June

July–September

October–December

See also

Related Research Articles

The following lists events that happened during 1903 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1904 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1909 in New Zealand.

1910 in New Zealand New Zealand-related events during the year of 1910

The following lists events that happened during 1910 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1914 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1915 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1916 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1918 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1920 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1921 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1923 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1924 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1926 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1927 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1928 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1929 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1930 in New Zealand.

1932 in New Zealand New Zealand-related events during the year of 1932

The following lists events that happened during 1932 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1933 in New Zealand.

The following lists events that happened during 1895 in New Zealand.

References

  1. Statistics New Zealand: New Zealand Official Yearbook, 1990. ISSN 0078-0170 page 52
  2. New Zealand Parliament - Parliament timeline
  3. "Elections NZ - Leaders of the Opposition". Archived from the original on 17 October 2008. Retrieved 6 April 2008.
  4. 1 2 Dictionary of New Zealand Biography: George Bruce Bolt
  5. Auckland Airport: Biography of George B. Bolt
  6. 1 2 3 Rendel, David (1975) Civil Aviation in New Zealand: An Illustrated History. Wellington. A.H. & A.W.Reed. ISBN   0-589-00905-2
  7. Christchurch City Libraries: Upper Riccarton Cemetery
  8. Te ARa Encyclopedia of New Zealand: Accidents and the development of aviation
  9. Te Ara Encyclopedia of New Zealand: Early flying feats
  10. Cricketarchive
  11. "PGA European - Holden New Zealand Open". The Sports Network. 2005. Retrieved 25 March 2009.
  12. McLintock, A. H., ed. (1966). "Men's Golf - National Champions". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. Te Ara - The Encyclopedia of New Zealand. Retrieved 13 February 2009.
  13. "List of NZ Trotting cup winners". Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 7 May 2009.
  14. Auckland Trotting cup at hrnz.co.nz Archived 17 June 2009 at the Wayback Machine .
  15. McLintock, A.H., ed. (1966). "Bowls, men's outdoor—tournament winners". An Encyclopaedia of New Zealand. Ministry for Culture and Heritage. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  16. Palenski, R. and Lambert, M. The New Zealand Almanac, 1982. Moa Almanac Press. ISBN   0-908570-55-4
  17. "New Zealand: List of champions". Rec.Sport.Soccer Statistics Foundation. 1999.

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