Timeline of New Zealand history

Last updated

This is a timeline of the history of New Zealand that includes only events deemed to be of principal importance – for less important events click the year heading or refer to List of years in New Zealand.

Contents

Prehistory (to 1000 CE)

Pre-colonial time (1000 to 1839)

1000 to 1600

17th century

1601 onwards
1642

18th century

1701–1730
1769
1772
1773
1777
1788
1790
1791
1792
1793

Early 19th century; 1801 to 1839

1806
1807 or 1808
1809
1814
1815
1819
1820
1821
1822
1823
1824
1825
1827
1831
1832
1833
1834
1835
1837
1838
1839

Colony and self-government (1840 to 1946)

1840s

1840
1841
1842
1843
1844
1845
1846
1848

1850s

1850
1852
1853
1854
1855
1856
1857
1858
1859

1860s

1860
1861
1862
1863
1864
1865
1866
1867
1868
1869

1870s

1870
1871
1872
1873
1874
1875
1876
1877
1878
1879

1880s

1881
1882
1883
1884
1885
1886
1887
1888
1889

1890s

1890
1891
1892
1893
1894
1896
1897
1898
1899

1900s

1900
1901
1902
1903
1904
1905
1906
1907
1908
1909

1910s

1910
1911
1912
1913
1914
1915
1916
1917
1918
1919

1920s

1920
1921
1922
1923
1924
1925
1926
1927
1928
1929

1930s

1930
1931
1932
1933
1934
1935
1936
1937
1938
1939

1940 to 1946

1940
1941
1942
1943
1944
1945
1946

Full independence (1947 to date)

1947 to 1949

1947
1948
1949

1950s

1950
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959

1960s

1960
1961
1962
1963
1964
1965
1966
1967
1968
1969

1970s

1970
1971
1972
1973
1974
1975
1976
1977
1978
1979

1980s

1980
1981
1982
1983
1984
1985
1986
1987
1988
1989

1990s

1990
1991
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999

2000s

2000
2001
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009

2010s

2010
2011
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
2019

2020s

2020
2021
2022
2023


See also

Related Research Articles

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