1919 in literature

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This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1919.

Contents

Events

Richmal Crompton English novelist, short story writer,

Richmal Crompton Lamburn was a popular English writer, best known for her Just William series of books, humorous short stories, and to a lesser extent adult fiction books.

The Just William series is a sequence of thirty-nine books written by English author Richmal Crompton. The books chronicle the adventures of the unruly schoolboy William Brown.

March 1 is the 60th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 305 days remaining until the end of the year.

New books

Fiction

Ryūnosuke Akutagawa Japanese writer

Ryūnosuke Akutagawa, art name Chōkōdō Shujin (澄江堂主人) was a Japanese writer active in the Taishō period in Japan. He is regarded as the "Father of the Japanese short story" and Japan's premier literary award, the Akutagawa Prize, is named after him. He committed suicide at the age of 35 through an overdose of barbital.

"Dragon: the Old Potter’s Tale" is a short story by Ryūnosuke Akutagawa. It was first published in a collection of Akutagawa short stories, Akutagawa Ryūnosuke zenshū. The story is based on a thirteenth-century Japanese tale, with Akutagawa’s Taishō literary interpretations of modern psychology and the nature of religion.

Sherwood Anderson American writer

Sherwood Anderson was an American novelist and short story writer, known for subjective and self-revealing works. Self-educated, he rose to become a successful copywriter and business owner in Cleveland and Elyria, Ohio. In 1912, Anderson had a nervous breakdown that led him to abandon his business and family to become a writer.

Children and young people

L. Frank Baum Childrens writer

Lyman Frank Baum was an American author chiefly famous for his children's books, particularly The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and its sequels. He wrote 14 novels in the Oz series, plus 41 other novels, 83 short stories, over 200 poems, and at least 42 scripts. He made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and the nascent medium of film; the 1939 adaptation of the first Oz book would become a landmark of 20th-century cinema. His works anticipated such century-later commonplaces as television, augmented reality, laptop computers, wireless telephones, women in high-risk and action-heavy occupations, and the ubiquity of advertising on clothing.

<i>The Magic of Oz</i> book by L. Frank Baum

The Magic of Oz: A Faithful Record of the Remarkable Adventures of Dorothy and Trot and the Wizard of Oz, Together with the Cowardly Lion, the Hungry Tiger and Cap'n Bill, in Their Successful Search for a Magical and Beautiful Birthday Present for Princess Ozma of Oz is the thirteenth Land of Oz book written by L. Frank Baum. Published on June 7, 1919, one month after the author's death, The Magic of Oz relates the unsuccessful attempt of the Munchkin boy Kiki Aru and former Nome King Ruggedo to conquer Oz.

Edgar Rice Burroughs American writer

Edgar Rice Burroughs was an American fiction writer best known for his celebrated and prolific output in the adventure and science-fiction genres. Among the most notable of his creations are the jungle hero Tarzan, the heroic Mars adventurer John Carter and the fictional landmass within Earth known as Pellucidar. Burroughs' California ranch is now the center of the Tarzana neighborhood in Los Angeles.

Drama

Ramón del Valle-Inclán Galician writer

Ramón María del Valle-Inclán y de la Peña was a Spanish dramatist, novelist and member of the Spanish Generation of 98. He is considered perhaps the most noteworthy and certainly the most radical dramatist working to subvert the traditionalism of the Spanish theatrical establishment in the early part of the 20th century. His drama is made all the more important by its influence on later generations of Spanish dramatists. His statue in Madrid therefore receives the homage of the theatrical profession on the national theater day.

Edward "Ned" Salisbury Field was an American author, playwright, artist, poet, and journalist. He was born in Indianapolis, Indiana to Edward Salisbury and Sarah Mills Hubbard Field. He was the husband of Isobel Osbourne and step-father of playwright Austin Strong.

<i>Wedding Bells</i> (play) play by Edward Salisbury Field

Wedding Bells is a 1919 comedic play which played on Broadway.

Poetry

Non-fiction

Births

Deaths

Awards

In literature

Related Research Articles

This article presents lists of literary events and publications in 1917.

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References

  1. Barbellion, W. N. P. (1919). The Journal of a Disappointed Man. New York: George H. Doran. p. 225.
  2. Abromeit, John (2011). Max Horkheimer and the Foundations of the Frankfurt School. Cambridge etc.: Cambridge University Press. p. 43. ISBN   978-1-107-00695-9.; Mommsen, Hans (2003). Alternatives to Hitler: German Resistance under the Third Reich. London & New York: I. B. Tauris. p. 289. ISBN   1-86064-745-6.; Mühsam, Erich; Kuhn, Gabriel (2010). "From Eisner to Leviné: The Emergence of the Bavarian Council Republic". In Kuhn, Gabriel. All Power to the Councils! A Documentary History of the German Revolution of 1918–1919. Oakland: PM Press. pp. 205–263. ISBN   978-1-60486-111-2.
  3. Norton, Robert E. (2017). "Ernst Kantorowicz: Man of Two Bodies". The Times Literary Supplement (5943).
  4. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography .
  5. "Production". Global Performing Arts Database. Retrieved 2015-05-22.
  6. Leavis, Q. D. (1965). Fiction and the Reading Public (rev. ed.). London: Chatto & Windus.