1909 in literature

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This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1909.

Contents

Events

T. E. Hulme English Imagist poet and critic

Thomas Ernest Hulme was an English critic and poet who, through his writings on art, literature and politics, had a notable influence upon modernism. He was an aesthetic philosopher and the 'father of imagism'.

The Poets' Club was a group devoted to the discussion of poetry. It met in London in the early years of the twentieth century. It was founded by Henry Simpson, a banker. T. E. Hulme helped set up the group in 1908, and was its first secretary.

Imagism 20th-century poetry movement

Imagism was a movement in early 20th-century Anglo-American poetry that favored precision of imagery and clear, sharp language. It has been described as the most influential movement in English poetry since the Pre-Raphaelites. As a poetic style it gave modernism its start in the early 20th century, and is considered to be the first organized modernist literary movement in the English language. Imagism is sometimes viewed as "a succession of creative moments" rather than a continuous or sustained period of development. René Taupin remarked that "it is more accurate to consider Imagism not as a doctrine, nor even as a poetic school, but as the association of a few poets who were for a certain time in agreement on a small number of important principles".

New books

Fiction

Florence L. Barclay British writer

Florence Louisa Barclay was an English romance novelist and short story writer.

<i>The Rosary</i> (novel) book by Florence L. Barclay

The Rosary is a novel by Florence L. Barclay. It was first published in 1909 by G.P. Putnam's Sons and was a bestselling novel for many years running, reaching the number one spot in 1910. It was adapted into five films.

Maurice Barrès French novelist

Auguste-Maurice Barrès was a French novelist, journalist and politician. Spending some time in Italy, he became a figure in French literature with the release of his work The Cult of the Self in 1888. In politics, he was first elected to the Chamber of Deputies in 1889 as a Boulangist and would play a prominent political role for the rest of his life.

Poster by Oskar Kokoschka advertising the premiere of his play Kokoschka Morder, Hoffnung der Frauen 1909.jpg
Poster by Oskar Kokoschka advertising the première of his play

Children and young people

L. Frank Baum Childrens writer

Lyman Frank Baum was an American author chiefly famous for his children's books, particularly The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and its sequels. He wrote 14 novels in the Oz series, plus 41 other novels, 83 short stories, over 200 poems, and at least 42 scripts. He made numerous attempts to bring his works to the stage and the nascent medium of film; the 1939 adaptation of the first Oz book would become a landmark of 20th-century cinema. His works anticipated such century-later commonplaces as television, augmented reality, laptop computers, wireless telephones, women in high-risk and action-heavy occupations, and the ubiquity of advertising on clothing.

<i>The Road to Oz</i> book

The Road to Oz: In Which Is Related How Dorothy Gale of Kansas, The Shaggy Man, Button Bright, and Polychrome the Rainbow's Daughter Met on an Enchanted Road and Followed it All the Way to the Marvelous Land of Oz. is the fifth of L. Frank Baum's Land of Oz books. It was originally published on July 10, 1909 and documents the adventures of Dorothy Gale's fourth visit to the Land of Oz.

<i>Aunt Janes Nieces at Work</i> book by L. Frank Baum

Aunt Jane's Nieces at Work is a 1909 young adult novel, written by L. Frank Baum, famous as the creator of the Land of Oz. It is the fourth volume in the ten-book series Aunt Jane's Nieces, which was the greatest success of Baum's literary career after the Oz books themselves. Like the other books in the series, it was issued under the pen name "Edith Van Dyne," one of Baum's multiple pseudonyms.

Drama

Poetry

Non-fiction

Births

Deaths

Awards

Related Research Articles

Filippo Tommaso Marinetti Italian poet and editor, founder of the Futurist movement

Filippo Tommaso Emilio Marinetti was an Italian poet, editor, art theorist, and founder of the Futurist movement. He was associated with the utopian and Symbolist artistic and literary community Abbaye de Créteil between 1907 and 1908. Marinetti is best known as the author of the first Futurist Manifesto, which was written and published in 1909; and also of the Fascist Manifesto.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1911.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1910.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1920.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1903.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1905.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1906.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1907.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1908.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1921.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1900.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1897.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1930.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1932.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1933.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1881.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1868.

This article presents lists of the literary events and publications in 1839.

Events from the year 1909 in France.

This is a list of authors whose works enter the public domain in part of the world in 2015.

References

  1. "La Nouvelle Revue française (NRF)", Encyclopædia Britannica , 2010, retrieved 2010-07-21
  2. Woods, Joanna (2007). "Katherine Mansfield, 1888–1923". Kōtare. Victoria University of Wellington. 7 (1): 63–98. Retrieved 2015-12-03.
  3. Ernst Horneffer: Unsere Ziele, in: Die Tat, 1. Jg., Heft 1 (April/1909), p. 1 (German)
  4. Wagenbach, Klaus (1964). Franz Kafka, in Selbstzeugnissen und Bilddokumenten. Reinbek: Rowohlt Verlag. p. 73. ISBN   3-499-50091-4.
  5. Leavis, Q. D. (1965). Fiction and the Reading Public (rev. ed.). London: Chatto & Windus.
  6. Adams, Henry Brooks (1911). The Life of George Cabot Lodge.