1952 Swiss Grand Prix

Last updated
1952 Swiss Grand Prix
Circuit Bremgarten.png
Circuit Bremgarten track layout
Race details
Date18 May 1952
Official name XII Großer Preis der Schweiz
Location Circuit Bremgarten, Bern, Switzerland
Course Permanent racing facility
Course length 7.280 km (4.524 mi)
Distance 62 laps, 451.360 km (280.462 mi)
Weather Sunny
Pole position
Driver Ferrari
Time 2:47.5
Fastest lap
Driver Flag of Italy.svg Piero Taruffi Ferrari
Time 2:49.1 on lap 46
Podium
First Ferrari
Second Ferrari
Third Gordini

The 1952 Swiss Grand Prix was a Formula Two race held on 18 May 1952 at Bremgarten Circuit. It was the first round of the 1952 World Championship of Drivers, in which each Grand Prix was run to Formula Two rules rather than the Formula One regulations normally used.

Formula Two race car class

Formula Two, abbreviated to F2, is a type of open wheel formula racing first codified in 1948. It was replaced in 1985 by Formula 3000, but revived by the FIA from 2009–2012 in the form of the FIA Formula Two Championship.

Contents

Pre-WWII Grand Prix great Rudolf Caracciola crashed heavily during a support sports car race. He survived with a broken leg, but this crash effectively ended his racing career. He was driving a Mercedes 300SL; his brakes locked up going into a corner and the car skidded off the road and hit a tree.

World War II 1939–1945 global war

World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945. The vast majority of the world's countries—including all the great powers—eventually formed two opposing military alliances: the Allies and the Axis. A state of total war emerged, directly involving more than 100 million people from over 30 countries. The major participants threw their entire economic, industrial, and scientific capabilities behind the war effort, blurring the distinction between civilian and military resources. World War II was the deadliest conflict in human history, marked by 50 to 85 million fatalities, most of whom were civilians in the Soviet Union and China. It included massacres, the genocide of the Holocaust, strategic bombing, premeditated death from starvation and disease, and the only use of nuclear weapons in war.

Rudolf Caracciola German/Swiss racecar and motorcycle driver

Otto Wilhelm Rudolf Caracciola was a racing driver from Remagen, Germany. He won the European Drivers' Championship, the pre-1950 equivalent of the modern Formula One World Championship, an unsurpassed three times. He also won the European Hillclimbing Championship three times – twice in sports cars, and once in Grand Prix cars. Caracciola raced for Mercedes-Benz during their original dominating Silver Arrows period, named after the silver colour of the cars, and set speed records for the firm. He was affectionately dubbed Caratsch by the German public, and was known by the title of Regenmeister, or "Rainmaster", for his prowess in wet conditions.

Italian driver Piero Taruffi scored his only win in a World Championship race, driving for Ferrari.

Report

With the withdrawal of Alfa Romeo from the World Championship, Ferrari were left as the sole competitive team under the existing regulations. It was therefore decided to run the Championship to Formula Two regulations.

Alfa Romeo in Formula One auto racing team

Italian motor manufacturer Alfa Romeo currently participate in Formula One as Alfa Romeo Racing while being operated by Sauber Motorsport AG, the brand has competed in motor racing as both a constructor and engine supplier sporadically between 1950 and 1987, and later as a commercial partner since 2015. The company's works drivers won the first two World Drivers' Championships in the pre-war Alfetta: Nino Farina in 1950; and Juan Manuel Fangio in 1951. Following these successes Alfa Romeo withdrew from Formula One.

Scuderia Ferrari S.p.A. is the racing division of luxury Italian auto manufacturer Ferrari and the racing team that competes in Formula One racing. The team is also nicknamed "The Prancing Horse", with reference to their logo. It is the oldest surviving and most successful Formula One team, having competed in every world championship since the 1950 Formula One season.

The works Ferrari team brought three drivers to the Swiss Grand Prix, namely Farina, Taruffi and Simon. Regular Ferrari drivers Alberto Ascari and Luigi Villoresi were both unavailable, the former due to his participation in the Indianapolis 500, and the latter because of his having had a road accident. Also running Ferraris were Rudi Fischer and Peter Hirt of Ecurie Espadon, and veteran Frenchman Louis Rosier. Gordini also had a three-car team for this race, consisting of Robert Manzon, B. Bira and the debutant Jean Behra. The HWM team, returning to the World Championship for the first time since the previous race at Bremgarten, fielded the all-British quartet of Abecassis, Collins, Macklin and Moss. Maserati had planned to enter defending World Drivers' Champion Juan Manuel Fangio and fellow Argentinian José Froilán González, but this did not come into fruition. Completing the field were the sole AFM entry of Hans Stuck and a number of privately run cars representing various constructors.

Giuseppe Farina Italian racecar driver

Dottore Emilio Giuseppe "Nino" Farina, was an Italian racing driver and was the first official Formula One World Champion, gaining the title in 1950. He was also the Italian Champion in 1937, 1938 and 1939.

Piero Taruffi racecar driver

Piero Taruffi, was a racing driver from Italy. He is also the father of a daughter, Prisca Taruffi, who is a rally driver.

André Simon was a racing driver from France. He participated in Formula One from 1951 to 1957, competing in a total of 12 World Championship races but scoring no championship points.

Former Alfa Romeo driver Nino Farina took pole position, alongside Taruffi and Manzon on the front row of the grid. Simon and Fischer started from the second row, in front of Collins, Behra and Toulo de Graffenried, who was driving an Enrico Platé-entered Maserati.

Toulo de Graffenried racecar driver

Baron Emmanuel 'Toulo' de Graffenried was a Swiss motor racing driver. He participated in 23 World Championship Grands Prix, debuting on 13 May 1950, and scored a total of nine championship points. He also participated in numerous non-Championship Formula One races.

Enrico Platé was a motor racing driver and team manager. Although born in Italy, Platé raced, and latterly ran his racing team Scuderia Enrico Platé, under Swiss nationality. He began his career as a mechanic, but swiftly took to racing cars in addition to repairing them. His best result as a driver was fourth place in the 1938 Modena Autodrome. Although he did not achieve any notable success in the pre-World War II voiturette class, Enrico Platé became a significant and influential figure in post-war grand prix and early Formula One racing as a team owner. During his brief career in this role, Platé ran Maseratis for notable drivers such as Prince Bira, Harry Schell and fellow Swiss Toulo de Graffenried.

Polesitter Farina led the race until his car broke down. His Ferrari teammate assumed the lead, which he held for the remainder of the race. Moss was impressively running in third place in the early stages, behind Farina and Taruffi, before he had to stop. The main battle was between Behra and Simon, for second place (once Farina had retired). When Behra had to stop, due to his exhaust pipe having fallen off, Farina, who had taken over Simon's car, assumed second place. However, further problems meant that he once again had to retire, on lap 51, handing second to local driver Rudi Fischer. The Swiss driver took his first Championship podium, being the only driver not to be lapped by Taruffi, who took his first (and only) World Championship race victory. Behra completed the podium, taking third on debut, while Ken Wharton (fourth) and Alan Brown (fifth) took the first points finishes for Frazer Nash and Cooper, respectively. [1]

Ken Wharton British racing driver

Frederick Charles Kenneth Wharton was a British racing driver from England. He competed in off-road trials, hillclimbs, and rallying, and also raced sports cars and single-seaters. He began racing in the new National 500cc Formula in his own special, and later acquired a Cooper. His World Championship Grand Prix debut was at the 1952 Swiss event, run to Formula 2 regulations, where he started from 13th position on the grid and finished 4th. He participated in a total of 15 World Championship Grands Prix, from which he scored 3 championship points.

Alan Everest Brown was a British racing driver from England. He took up motor racing in a Cooper, later forming the Ecurie Richmond team with Eric Brandon. He participated in 9 World Championship Formula One Grands Prix, debuting on 18 May 1952 and numerous non-Championship Formula One races. He scored two championship points. He was the first driver to score championship points for Cooper and also gave the first Vanwall its race debut.

Frazer Nash brand

Frazer Nash was a brand of British sports car manufactured from 1922 first by Frazer Nash Limited founded by engineer Archibald Frazer-Nash. On its financial collapse in 1927, a new company AFN Limited was incorporated. In 1929 control of AFN passed to Harold John Aldington.

Entries

NoDriverEntrantConstructorChassisEngineTyre
2 Flag of Germany.svg Hans Stuck AFM AFM-KüchenAFM 6Küchen 2.0 V8 E
4 Flag of Germany.svg Toni Ulmen Toni Ulmen Veritas Veritas Meteor Veritas 2.0 L6 D
6 Flag of France.svg Jean Behra Equipe Gordini Gordini Gordini T16 Gordini 20 2.0 L6 E
8 Flag of France.svg Robert Manzon Gordini Gordini T16 Gordini 20 2.0 L6 E
10 Flag of Thailand.svg Prince Bira Simca-Gordini Simca-Gordini T15 Gordini 1500 1.5 L4 E
12 Flag of France.svg Louis Rosier Ecurie Rosier Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari Type 500 2.0 L4 D
14 Flag of France.svg Maurice Trintignant Ferrari Ferrari 166F2-50 Ferrari 166 2.0 V12 P
16 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg George Abecassis HW Motors HWM-Alta HWM 52 Alta F2 2.0 L4 D
18 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Peter Collins HWM-Alta HWM 52 Alta F2 2.0 L4 D
20 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Lance Macklin HWM-Alta HWM 52 Alta F2 2.0 L4 D
22 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Ken Wharton Scuderia Franera Frazer Nash-Bristol Frazer Nash FN48 Bristol BS1 2.0 L6 D
24 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Eric Brandon Ecurie Richmond Cooper-Bristol Cooper T20 Bristol BS1 2.0 L6 D
26 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Alan Brown Cooper-Bristol Cooper T20 Bristol BS1 2.0 L6 D
28 Flag of Italy.svg Nino Farina Scuderia Ferrari Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari Type 500 2.0 L4 P
30 Flag of Italy.svg Piero Taruffi Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari Type 500 2.0 L4 P
32 Flag of France.svg André Simon 1 Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari Type 500 2.0 L4 P
34 Flag of Argentina.svg Juan Manuel Fangio 2 Officine Alfieri Maserati Maserati Maserati A6GCM Maserati A6G 2.0 L6 P
36 Flag of Argentina.svg José Froilán González 2 Maserati Maserati A6GCM Maserati A6G 2.0 L6 P
38 Flag of Switzerland.svg Toulo de Graffenried Enrico Platé Maserati-Platé Maserati 4CLT-48 Platé 2.0 L4 P
40 Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Harry Schell Maserati-Platé Maserati 4CLT-48 Platé 2.0 L4 P
42 Flag of Switzerland.svg Rudi Fischer Ecurie Espadon Ferrari Ferrari 500 Ferrari Type 500 2.0 L4 P
44 Flag of Switzerland.svg Peter Hirt 3 Ferrari Ferrari 212 Ferrari 166 2.0 V12 P
46 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Stirling Moss HW Motors HWM-Alta HWM 52 Alta F2 2.0 L4 D
50 Flag of Switzerland.svg Max de Terra 4 Alfred Dattner Simca-Gordini Simca-Gordini T11 Gordini 1500 1.5 L4 E
Sources: [2] [3]
^1 — André Simon qualified and drove 21 laps of the race in the #32 Ferrari. Nino Farina, whose own vehicle had already retired, took over the car for a further 30 laps before again being forced to retire. [4]
^2 — Juan Manuel Fangio and José Froilán González, whose cars were unavailable, withdrew from the event prior to practice. [5]
^3 — Peter Hirt qualified and drove the entire race in the #44 Ferrari. Rudolf Schoeller, named substitute driver for the car, was not used during the Grand Prix. [6]
^4 — Max de Terra drove the #50 Simca-Gordini in the race. Alfred Dattner, who was also entered in the same car, was unable to take part in the Grand Prix due to illness. [5]

Classification

Qualifying

PosNoDriverConstructorTimeGap
128 Flag of Italy.svg Nino Farina Ferrari 2:47.5
230 Flag of Italy.svg Piero Taruffi Ferrari 2:50.1+ 2.6
38 Flag of France.svg Robert Manzon Gordini 2:52.1+ 4.6
432 Flag of France.svg André Simon Ferrari 2:52.4+ 4.9
542 Flag of Switzerland.svg Rudi Fischer Ferrari 2:53.3+ 5.8
618 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Peter Collins HWM-Alta 2:55.9+ 8.4
76 Flag of France.svg Jean Behra Gordini 2:55.9+ 8.4
838 Flag of Switzerland.svg Toulo de Graffenried Maserati-Platé 2:56.4+ 8.9
946 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Stirling Moss HWM-Alta 2:56.4+ 8.9
1016 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg George Abecassis HWM-Alta 2:56.9+ 9.4
1110 Flag of Thailand.svg Prince Bira Simca-Gordini 2:59.3+ 11.8
1220 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Lance Macklin HWM-Alta 3:00.2+ 12.7
1322 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Ken Wharton Frazer Nash-Bristol 3:00.9+ 13.4
142 Flag of Germany.svg Hans Stuck AFM-Küchen 3:01.7+ 14.2
1526 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Alan Brown Cooper-Bristol 3:02.5+ 15.0
164 Flag of Germany.svg Toni Ulmen Veritas 3:05.6+ 18.1
1724 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Eric Brandon Cooper-Bristol 3:05.8+ 18.3
1840 Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Harry Schell Maserati-Platé 3:07.6+ 20.1
1944 Flag of Switzerland.svg Peter Hirt Ferrari 3:10.2+ 22.7
2012 Flag of France.svg Louis Rosier Ferrari No time
2150 Flag of Switzerland.svg Max de Terra Simca-Gordini No time
2214 Flag of France.svg Maurice Trintignant Ferrari No time

Race

PosNoDriverConstructorLapsTime/RetiredGridPoints
130 Flag of Italy.svg Piero Taruffi Ferrari 623:01:46.129 1
242 Flag of Switzerland.svg Rudi Fischer Ferrari 62+2:37.256
36 Flag of France.svg Jean Behra Gordini 61+1 lap74
422 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Ken Wharton Frazer Nash-Bristol 60+2 laps133
526 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Alan Brown Cooper-Bristol 59+3 laps152
638 Flag of Switzerland.svg Toulo de Graffenried Maserati-Platé 58+4 laps8
744 Flag of Switzerland.svg Peter Hirt Ferrari 56+6 laps19
824 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Eric Brandon Cooper-Bristol 55+7 laps17
Ret10 Flag of Thailand.svg Prince Bira Simca-Gordini 52Engine11
Ret32 Flag of France.svg André Simon
Flag of Italy.svg Nino Farina
Ferrari 51Magneto4
Ret40 Flag of the United States (1912-1959).svg Harry Schell Maserati-Platé 31Engine18
Ret46 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Stirling Moss HWM-Alta 24Withdrew9
Ret20 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Lance Macklin HWM-Alta 24Withdrew12
Ret8 Flag of France.svg Robert Manzon Gordini 20Radiator3
Ret28 Flag of Italy.svg Nino Farina Ferrari 16Magneto1
Ret18 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Peter Collins HWM-Alta 12Halfshaft6
Ret16 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg George Abecassis HWM-Alta 12Halfshaft10
Ret2 Flag of Germany.svg Hans Stuck AFM-Küchen 4Engine14
Ret4 Flag of Germany.svg Toni Ulmen Veritas 4Fuel leak16
Ret12 Flag of France.svg Louis Rosier Ferrari 2Accident20
Ret50 Flag of Switzerland.svg Max de Terra Simca-Gordini 1Magneto21
DNS14 Flag of France.svg Maurice Trintignant Ferrari 0Engine22
Source: [7]
Notes

Notes

Championship standings after the race

Drivers' Championship standings
PosDriverPoints
1 Flag of Italy.svg Piero Taruffi 9
2 Flag of Switzerland.svg Rudi Fischer 6
3 Flag of France.svg Jean Behra 4
4 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Ken Wharton 3
5 Flag of the United Kingdom.svg Alan Brown 2
Source: [8]

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References

  1. "Swiss GP, 1952 Race Report". Grandprix.com. Retrieved 14 August 2012.
  2. "1952 Swiss Grand Prix - Race Entries". manipef1.com. Archived from the original on 9 May 2012. Retrieved 6 January 2016.
  3. "1952 Swiss GP - Entry List". chicanef1.com. Retrieved 11 December 2013.
  4. "Swiss Grand Prix 1952 - Results". ESPN F1. Archived from the original on 17 December 2013. Retrieved 10 January 2014.
  5. 1 2 "Switzerland 1952 - Result". statsf1.com. Retrieved 10 January 2014.
  6. "Switzerland 1952 - Race entrants". statsf1.com. Retrieved 10 January 2014.
  7. "1952 Swiss Grand Prix". formula1.com. Archived from the original on 2 January 2010. Retrieved 4 August 2015.
  8. "Switzerland 1952 - Championship • STATS F1". www.statsf1.com. Retrieved 1 March 2019.
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