290

Last updated

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
290 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 290
CCXC
Ab urbe condita 1043
Assyrian calendar 5040
Balinese saka calendar 211–212
Bengali calendar −303
Berber calendar 1240
Buddhist calendar 834
Burmese calendar −348
Byzantine calendar 5798–5799
Chinese calendar 己酉(Earth  Rooster)
2986 or 2926
     to 
庚戌年 (Metal  Dog)
2987 or 2927
Coptic calendar 6–7
Discordian calendar 1456
Ethiopian calendar 282–283
Hebrew calendar 4050–4051
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 346–347
 - Shaka Samvat 211–212
 - Kali Yuga 3390–3391
Holocene calendar 10290
Iranian calendar 332 BP – 331 BP
Islamic calendar 342 BH – 341 BH
Javanese calendar 170–171
Julian calendar 290
CCXC
Korean calendar 2623
Minguo calendar 1622 before ROC
民前1622年
Nanakshahi calendar −1178
Seleucid era 601/602 AG
Thai solar calendar 832–833
Tibetan calendar 阴土鸡年
(female Earth-Rooster)
416 or 35 or −737
     to 
阳金狗年
(male Iron-Dog)
417 or 36 or −736
Litus Saxonicum (England) Litus Saxonicum.png
Litus Saxonicum (England)

Year 290 ( CCXC ) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Valerius (or, less frequently, year 1043 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination 290 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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Diocletian Augustus of the Eastern Roman Empire

Diocletian, was a Roman emperor from 284 to 305. Born to a family of low status in Dalmatia, Diocletian rose through the ranks of the military to become a cavalry commander of the Emperor Carus's army. After the deaths of Carus and his son Numerian on campaign in Persia, Diocletian was proclaimed emperor. The title was also claimed by Carus's surviving son, Carinus, but Diocletian defeated him in the Battle of the Margus.

4th century Century

The 4th century was the time period which lasted from 301 to 400. In the West, the early part of the century was shaped by Constantine the Great, who became the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. Gaining sole reign of the empire, he is also noted for re-establishing a single imperial capital, choosing the site of ancient Byzantium in 330 to build the city soon called Nova Roma ; it was later renamed Constantinople in his honor.

The 300s decade ran from January 1, 300, to December 31, 309.

286 286

Year 286 (CCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Maximus and Aquilinus. The denomination 286 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 305 (CCCV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Valerius. The denomination 305 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

The 290s decade ran from January 1, 290, to December 31, 299.

The 280s decade ran from January 1, 280, to December 31, 289.

Year 297 (CCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Valerius. The denomination 297 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

302 302

Year 302 (CCCII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Valerius or, less frequently, year 1055 Ab urbe condita. The denomination 302 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

296 296

Year 296 (CCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Constantius. The denomination 296 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

293 293

Year 293 (CCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Valerius. The denomination 293 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 289 (CCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Bassus and Quintianus. The denomination 289 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 288 (CCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Ianuarianus. The denomination 288 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 285 (CCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the "Year of the Consulship of Carinus and Aurelius". The denomination 285 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

306 306

Year 306 (CCCVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Valerius. The denomination 306 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

307 307

Year 307 (CCCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Valerius and Constantius. The denomination 307 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Constantius Chlorus Augustus of the Western Roman Empire

Constantius I, posthumously known after the sixth century as Constantius Chlorus, was a Roman Emperor. He ruled as Caesar from 293 to 305 and as Augustus from 305 to 306. He was the junior colleague of the Augustus Maximian under the Tetrarchy and succeeded him as senior co-emperor of the western part of the empire. Constantius ruled the West while Galerius was Augustus in the East. He was the father of Constantine the Great and founder of the Constantinian dynasty.

Maximian Roman emperor

Maximian was Roman Emperor from 286 to 305. He was Caesar from 285 to 286, then Augustus from 286 to 305. He shared the latter title with his co-emperor and superior, Diocletian, whose political brain complemented Maximian's military brawn. Maximian established his residence at Trier but spent most of his time on campaign. In late 285, he suppressed rebels in Gaul known as the Bagaudae. From 285 to 288, he fought against Germanic tribes along the Rhine frontier. Together with Diocletian, he launched a scorched earth campaign deep into Alamannic territory in 288, temporarily relieving the Rhine provinces from the threat of Germanic invasion.

Carausius Augustus of Gaul and Britannia

Marcus Aurelius Mausaeus Valerius Carausius was a military commander of the Roman Empire in the 3rd century. He was a Menapian from Belgic Gaul, who usurped power in 286, during the Carausian Revolt, declaring himself emperor in Britain and northern Gaul. He did this only 13 years after the Gallic Empire of the Batavian Postumus was ended in 273. He held power for seven years, fashioning the name "Emperor of the North" for himself, before being assassinated by his finance minister Allectus.

The accession on November 20, 284, of Diocletian, the lower-class, Greek-speaking Dalmatian commander of Carus's and Numerian's household cavalry, marked a major departure from traditional Roman constitutional theory regarding the Emperor, who was nominally first among equals during the Principate. Whereas before Emperors had worn only a purple toga and were greeted with deference, Diocletian wore jewelled robes and shoes, and required those who greeted him to kneel and kiss the hem of his robe. In many ways, Diocletian was the first monarchical Emperor, and this is symbolised by the fact that the word dominus ("Lord") rapidly replaced princeps as the favoured word for referring to the Emperor.

References

  1. Giaquinta, Mariano; Modica, Giuseppe (2012). Mathematical Analysis: Functions of One Variable. Springer Science & Business Media. p. 315. ISBN   978-1-4612-0007-9.