350

Last updated

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
350 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 350
CCCL
Ab urbe condita 1103
Assyrian calendar 5100
Balinese saka calendar 271–272
Bengali calendar −243
Berber calendar 1300
Buddhist calendar 894
Burmese calendar −288
Byzantine calendar 5858–5859
Chinese calendar 己酉(Earth  Rooster)
3046 or 2986
     to 
庚戌年 (Metal  Dog)
3047 or 2987
Coptic calendar 66–67
Discordian calendar 1516
Ethiopian calendar 342–343
Hebrew calendar 4110–4111
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 406–407
 - Shaka Samvat 271–272
 - Kali Yuga 3450–3451
Holocene calendar 10350
Iranian calendar 272 BP – 271 BP
Islamic calendar 280 BH – 279 BH
Javanese calendar 232–233
Julian calendar 350
CCCL
Korean calendar 2683
Minguo calendar 1562 before ROC
民前1562年
Nanakshahi calendar −1118
Seleucid era 661/662 AG
Thai solar calendar 892–893
Tibetan calendar 阴土鸡年
(female Earth-Rooster)
476 or 95 or −677
     to 
阳金狗年
(male Iron-Dog)
477 or 96 or −676
Magnus Magnentius Double Centenionalis Magnentius-XR-s4017.jpg
Magnus Magnentius

Year 350 ( CCCL ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Sergius and Nigrinianus (or, less frequently, year 1103 Ab urbe condita ). The denomination 350 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Roman Empire

January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 347 days remaining until the end of the year.

Constans Roman emperor

Constans or Constans I was Roman Emperor from 337 to 350. He defeated his brother Constantine II in 340, but anger in the army over his personal life (homosexuality) and favouritism towards his barbarian bodyguards led the general Magnentius to rebel, resulting in the assassination of Constans in 350.

Magnentius Ancient Roman emperor

Magnentius was an usurper of the Roman Empire from 350 to 353.

Asia

Pushyavarman Ruler of Kamarupa

Pushyavarman was the first historical ruler of Kamarupa (Assam), who established the Varman dynasty in 350 AD.

Varman dynasty dynasty

The Varman dynasty (350-650) is the first historical dynasty of the Kamarupa kingdom. It was established by Pushyavarman, a contemporary of Samudragupta. This dynasty became vassals of the Gupta Empire, but as the power of the Guptas waned, Mahendravarman (470-494) performed two horse sacrifices and threw off the imperial yoke. The first of the three Kamarupa dynasties, the Varmans were followed by the Mlechchha and then the Pala dynasties.

Assam State in northeast India

Assam is a state in India, situated south of the eastern Himalayas along the Brahmaputra and Barak River valleys. Assam covers an area of 78,438 km2 (30,285 sq mi). The state is bordered by Bhutan and the state of Arunachal Pradesh to the north; Nagaland and Manipur to the east; Meghalaya, Tripura, Mizoram and Bangladesh to the south; and West Bengal to the west via the Siliguri Corridor, a 22 kilometres (14 mi) strip of land that connects the state to the rest of India.

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Art

Births

Honoratus Abbot of Lérins and Archbishop of Arles

Honoratus was the founder of Lérins Abbey who later became an early Archbishop of Arles. He is honored as a saint in the Catholic and Eastern Orthodox Churches.

Hypatia was a Hellenistic Neoplatonist philosopher, astronomer, and mathematician, who lived in Alexandria, Egypt, then part of the Eastern Roman Empire. She was a prominent thinker of the Neoplatonic school in Alexandria, where she taught philosophy and astronomy. She is the first female mathematician whose life is reasonably well recorded. Hypatia was renowned in her own lifetime as a great teacher and a wise counselor. She is known to have written a commentary on Diophantus's thirteen-volume Arithmetica, which may survive in part, having been interpolated into Diophantus's original text, and another commentary on Apollonius of Perga's treatise on conic sections, which has not survived. Many modern scholars also believe that Hypatia may have edited the surviving text of Ptolemy's Almagest, based on the title of her father Theon's commentary on Book III of the Almagest.

Neoplatonism

Neoplatonism is a term used to designate a strand of Platonic philosophy that emerged in the third century AD against the background of Hellenistic philosophy and religion. The term does not encapsulate a set of ideas as much as it encapsulates a chain of thinkers which began with Ammonious Saccas and his student Plotinus and which stretches to the sixth century AD. Even though Neoplatonism primarily circumscribes the thinkers who are now labeled Neoplatonists and not their ideas, there are some ideas that are common to Neoplatonic systems, for example, the monistic idea that all of reality can be derived from a single principle, "the One".

Deaths

Nepotianus died on June 30, 350 Centenionalis-Nepotianus-rome RIC 200.2.jpg
Nepotianus died on June 30, 350
Saint Paul I of Constantinople Paul the Confessor, bishop of Constantinople (Menologion of Basil II).jpg
Saint Paul I of Constantinople

February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 323 days remaining until the end of the year.

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 193 days remaining until the end of the year.

Saint Martin of Tongres is venerated as the seventh bishop of Tongeren. He apostolized the Hesbaye district of Brabant.

Date Unknown

Eutropia was the daughter of Emperor Constantius Chlorus and of Flavia Maximiana Theodora, and therefore half-sister of Emperor Constantine I.

Shi Jian (石鑒) was briefly an emperor of the Chinese/Jie state Later Zhao. He was the third of four short-lived emperors after the death of his father Shi Hu. He is sometimes referred to by his title prior to becoming emperor, Prince of Yiyang (義陽王). Arguably, it was his machinations with his powerful adoptive nephew Shi Min against his brother Shi Zun that finally led to Later Zhao's downfall.

The Jié were members of a small tribe who invaded North China in the 4th century. During the period of the Sixteen Kingdoms, they were known by the Chinese as one of the Five Barbarians. Chinese sources state that the Jie originated among the Yuezhi. Under Shi Le, they established the Later Zhao state. The Jie were allegedly "completely exterminated" by Ran Min in the Wei–Jie war in AD 350 following the fall of the Later Zhao; however, Chinese history continue to document Jie people and account of their people's activities after the Wei-Jie war.

Related Research Articles

Constantius II Roman emperor

Constantius II was Roman Emperor from 337 to 361. His reign saw constant warfare on the borders against the Sasanian Empire and Germanic peoples, while internally the Roman Empire went through repeated civil wars and usurpations, culminating in Constantius' overthrow as emperor by his cousin Julian. His religious policies inflamed domestic conflicts that would continue after his death.

4th century Century

The 4th century was the time period which lasted from 301 to 400. In the West, the early part of the century was shaped by Constantine the Great, who became the first Roman emperor to adopt Christianity. Gaining sole reign of the empire, he is also noted for re-establishing a single imperial capital, choosing the site of ancient Byzantium in 330 to build the city soon called Nova Roma ; it was later renamed Constantinople in his honor.

The 410s decade ran from January 1, 410, to December 31, 419.

The 340s decade ran from January 1, 340, to December 31, 349.

The 350s decade ran from January 1, 350, to December 31, 359.

355 Year

Year 355 (CCCLV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Arbitio and Maesius. The denomination 355 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

354 Year

Year 354 (CCCLIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Constantius and Constantius. The denomination 354 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 353 (CCCLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Magnentius and Decentius. The denomination 353 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 352 (CCCLII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Decentius and Paulus. The denomination 352 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

351 Year

Year 351 (CCCLI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Magnentius and Gaiso. The denomination 351 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 340 (CCCXL) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Acindynus and Valerius. The denomination 340 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Vetranio Roman emperor

Vetranio, sometimes incorrectly referred to as Vetriano, was a Roman soldier and statesman, a native of the province of Moesia.

Nepotianus Roman usurper

Julius Nepotianus, sometimes known in English as Nepotian, was a member of the Constantinian dynasty who reigned as a short-lived usurper of the Roman Empire. He ruled the city of Rome for twenty-eight days, before being killed by his rival usurper Magnentius' general Marcellinus.

The Battle of Mursa Major was fought in AD 351 between the eastern Roman armies led by Constantius II and the western forces supporting the usurper Magnentius.

Marcellinus (magister officiorum) Roman officer (4th c.)

Marcellinus was a Roman Empire officer under Roman Emperor Constans and usurper Magnentius.

The Roman civil war of 350–351 AD was a war fought between the Roman emperor Constantius II and the usurper Magnentius.

References

  1. Roberts, J: "History of the World.". Penguin, 1994.