Abydos King List

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The start of the king list, showing Seti and his son - Ramesses II - on the way to making an offering to Ptah-Seker-Osiris, on behalf of their 72 ancestors - the contents of the king list. Ramesses is depicted holding censers. C+B-Egypt-Fig9-SetiIAbydosKingList.PNG
The start of the king list, showing Seti and his son - Ramesses II - on the way to making an offering to Ptah-Seker-Osiris, on behalf of their 72 ancestors - the contents of the king list. Ramesses is depicted holding censers.

The Abydos King List, also known as the Abydos Table, is a list of the names of seventy-six kings of Ancient Egypt, found on a wall of the Temple of Seti I at Abydos, Egypt. It consists of three rows of thirty-eight cartouches (borders enclosing the name of a king) in each row. The upper two rows contain names of the kings, while the third row merely repeats Seti I's throne name and nomen.

Ancient Egypt ancient civilization of Northeastern Africa

Ancient Egypt was a civilization of ancient North Africa, concentrated along the lower reaches of the Nile River in the place that is now the country Egypt. Ancient Egyptian civilization followed prehistoric Egypt and coalesced around 3100 BC with the political unification of Upper and Lower Egypt under Menes. The history of ancient Egypt occurred as a series of stable kingdoms, separated by periods of relative instability known as Intermediate Periods: the Old Kingdom of the Early Bronze Age, the Middle Kingdom of the Middle Bronze Age and the New Kingdom of the Late Bronze Age.

Seti I second pharaoh of the 19th dynasty in ancient egypt

Menmaatre Seti I was a pharaoh of the New Kingdom Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt, the son of Ramesses I and Sitre, and the father of Ramesses II. As with all dates in Ancient Egypt, the actual dates of his reign are unclear, and various historians claim different dates, with 1294 BC to 1279 BC and 1290 BC to 1279 BC being the most commonly used by scholars today.

Abydos, Egypt City in ancient Egypt

Abydos is one of the oldest cities of ancient Egypt, and also of the eighth nome in Upper Egypt. It is located about 11 kilometres west of the Nile at latitude 26° 10' N, near the modern Egyptian towns of el-'Araba el Madfuna and al-Balyana. In the ancient Egyptian language, the city was called Abdju. The English name Abydos comes from the Greek Ἄβυδος, a name borrowed by Greek geographers from the unrelated city of Abydos on the Hellespont.

Contents

Besides providing the order of the Old Kingdom kings, it is the sole source to date of the names of many of the kings of the Seventh and Eighth Dynasties, so the list is valued greatly for that reason.

Old Kingdom of Egypt period of Ancient Egypt in the 3rd millennium BC

In ancient Egyptian history, the Old Kingdom is the period spanning c. 2686–2181 BC. It is also known as the "Age of the Pyramids" or the "Age of the Pyramid Builders", as it encompasses the reigns of the great pyramid builders of the Fourth Dynasty— among them King Sneferu, who perfected the art of pyramid-building, and the kings Khufu, Khafre and Menkaure, who constructed the pyramids at Giza. Egypt attained its first sustained peak of civilization during the Old Kingdom—the first of three so-called "Kingdom" periods which mark the high points of civilization in the lower Nile Valley.

This list omits the names of many earlier pharaohs who were apparently considered illegitimate — such as the Hyksos, Hatshepsut, Akhenaten, Smenkhkare, Tutankhamen, and Ay.

Hyksos Asian invaders of Egypt, established 15th dynasty ca. 1650-1550 BC

The Hyksos were a people of diverse origins, possibly from Western Asia, who settled in the eastern Nile Delta some time before 1650 BC. The arrival of the Hyksos led to the end of the Thirteenth Dynasty and initiated the Second Intermediate Period of Egypt. In the context of Ancient Egypt, the term "Asiatic" refers to people native to areas east of Egypt.

Hatshepsut Egyptian Pharaoh

Hatshepsut was the fifth pharaoh of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt. She was the second historically-confirmed female pharaoh, the first being Sobekneferu.

Akhenaten 18th dynasty pharaoh

Akhenaten, known before the fifth year of his reign as Amenhotep IV, was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the 18th Dynasty who ruled for 17 years and died perhaps in 1336 BC or 1334 BC. He is noted for abandoning traditional Egyptian polytheism and introducing worship centered on the Aten, which is sometimes described as monolatristic, henotheistic, or even quasi-monotheistic. An early inscription likens the Aten to the sun as compared to stars, and later official language avoids calling the Aten a god, giving the solar deity a status above mere gods.

Contents of the king list

Drawing of the cartouches in the Abydos King List. AbydosKinglistDrawing.png
Drawing of the cartouches in the Abydos King List.

First Dynasty

Cartouches 1 to 8Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 1 to 8 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 1-8.jpg
Cartouches 1 to 8 (Click to enlarge)
1Meni. Probably King Narmer. Menes
2Teti. Same name in Turin King List. Hor-Aha
3Iti. Same name in Turin King List. Djer
4Ita. Called Itui in Turin King List. Djet
5Septi. Called Qenti in Turin King List. Den
6Meribiap. Called Merbiapen in Turin King List. Anedjib
7Semsu. Called Semsem in Turin King List. Semerkhet.
8Qebeh. Same name in Turin King List. Qa'a.

Second Dynasty

Cartouches 9 to 14Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 9 to 14 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 9-14.jpg
Cartouches 9 to 14 (Click to enlarge)
9Bedjau. Called Baunetjer in Turin King List. Hotepsekhemwy
10Kakau. Same name in Turin King List. Raneb
11Banetjer. Same name in Turin King List. Ninetjer
12Wadjnas. Name damaged in Turin King List. Weneg
13Sendi. Called Senedj in Turin King List. Senedj
14Djadjay. Called Bebti in Turin King List. Khasekhemwy

Third Dynasty

Cartouches 15 to 19Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 15 to 19 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 15-19.jpg
Cartouches 15 to 19 (Click to enlarge)
15Nebka. Same name in Turin King List. Nebka
16Djeser-za. Djoser-it in Turin King List. Djoser
17Teti. Djoser-ti in Turin King List. Sekhemkhet
18Sedjes. Hudjefa in Turin King List. Khaba
19Neferkara. Huni in Turin King List. Huni

Fourth Dynasty

Cartouches 20 to 25Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 20 to 25 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 20-25.jpg
Cartouches 20 to 25 (Click to enlarge)
20Sneferu. Senefer in Turin King List. Sneferu
21Khufu. Name missing in Turin King List. Khufu
22Djedefre. Name missing in Turin King List. Djedefre
23Khafra. Incomplete name in Turin King List Khafra
24Menkaura. Name missing in Turin King List. Menkaura
25Shepseskaf. Name missing in Turin King List. Shepseskaf

Fifth Dynasty

Cartouches 26 to 33Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 26 to 33 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 26-33.jpg
Cartouches 26 to 33 (Click to enlarge)
26Userkaf. Name partially lost in Turin king list. Userkaf
27Sahure. Name lost in Turin King List. Sahure
28Kakai Neferirkare Kakai
29Neferefre Neferefre
30Nyuserre Nyuserre Ini
31Menkauhor Menkauhor Kaiu
32Djedkare. Djed in Turin King List. Djedkare Isesi
33Unis. Same name in Turin King List. Unas

Sixth Dynasty

Cartouches 34 to 39Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 34 to 39 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 34-39.jpg
Cartouches 34 to 39 (Click to enlarge)
34Teti Teti
35Userkare Userkare
36Meryre Pepi I Meryre
37Merenre Merenre Nemtyemsaf II
38Neferkare Pepi II Neferkare
39Merenre Saemsaf Merenre Nemtyemsaf II

Eighth Dynasty

Cartouches 40 to 47Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 40 to 47 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 40-47.jpg
Cartouches 40 to 47 (Click to enlarge)
40Netjerikare Netjerkare
41Menkare Menkare
42Neferkare Neferkare II
43Neferkare Neby Neferkare Neby
44Djedkare Shemai Djedkare Shemai
45Neferkare Khendu Neferkare Khendu
46Merenhor Merenhor
47Sneferka Neferkamin
Cartouches 48 to 56Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 48 to 56 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 48-56.jpg
Cartouches 48 to 56 (Click to enlarge)
48Nikare Nikare
49Neferkare Tereru Neferkare Tereru
50Neferkahor Neferkahor
51Neferkare Pepiseneb Neferkare Pepiseneb
52Sneferka Anu Neferkamin Anu
53Kaukara Qakare Ibi
54Neferkaure Neferkaure II
55Neferkauhor Neferkauhor
56Neferirkare Neferirkare

Eleventh/Twelfth Dynasty

Cartouches 57 to 61Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 57 to 61 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 57-61.jpg
Cartouches 57 to 61 (Click to enlarge)
57Nebhepetre Mentuhotep II
58Sankhkare Mentuhotep III
59Sehetepibre Amenemhat I
60Kheperkare Senusret I
61Nubkaure Amenemhat II
Cartouches 62 to 65Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 62 to 65 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 62-65.jpg
Cartouches 62 to 65 (Click to enlarge)
62Khakheperre Senusret II
63Khakaure Senusret III
64Nimaatre Amenemhat III
65Maakherure Amenemhat IV

Eighteenth Dynasty

Cartouches 66 to 74Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 66 to 74 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 66-74.jpg
Cartouches 66 to 74 (Click to enlarge)
66Nebpehtira Ahmose I
67Djeserkara Amenhotep I
68Aakheperkara Thutmose I
69Aakheperenra Thutmose II
70Menkheperra Thutmose III
71Aakheperura Amenhotep II
72Menkheperura Thutmose IV
73Nebmaatra Amenhotep III
74Djeserkheperura
Setepenra
Haremheb

Nineteenth Dynasty

Cartouches 75 and 76Name written in the listCommon name
Cartouches 75 and 76 (Click to enlarge) Abydos Koenigsliste 75-76.jpg
Cartouches 75 and 76 (Click to enlarge)
75Menpehtira Ramesses I
76Menmaatra Seti I

See also

Karnak king list Wikimedia list article

The Karnak king list, a list of early Egyptian kings engraved in stone, was located in the southwest corner of the Festival Hall of Thutmose III, in the middle of the Precinct of Amun-Re, in the Karnak Temple Complex, in modern Luxor, Egypt. Composed during the reign of Thutmose III, it listed sixty-one kings beginning with Sneferu from Egypt's Old Kingdom. Only the names of thirty-nine kings are still legible, and one is not written in a cartouche.

Palermo Stone document

The Palermo Stone is one of seven surviving fragments of a stele known as the Royal Annals of the Old Kingdom of Ancient Egypt. The stele contained a list of the kings of Egypt from the First Dynasty through to the early part of the Fifth Dynasty and noted significant events in each year of their reigns. It was probably made during the Fifth dynasty. The Palermo Stone is held in the Regional Archeological Museum Antonio Salinas in the city of Palermo, Italy, from which it derives its name.

The Saqqara Tablet, now in the Egyptian Museum, is an ancient stone engraving which features a list of Egyptian pharaohs surviving from the Ramesside Period. It was found during 1861 in Egypt in Saqqara, in the tomb of Tjenry, an official of the pharaoh Ramesses II.

Related Research Articles

Ramesses I the founding Pharaoh of Ancient Egypts Nineteenth Dynasty

Menpehtyre Ramesses I was the founding pharaoh of ancient Egypt's 19th dynasty. The dates for his short reign are not completely known but the time-line of late 1292–1290 BC is frequently cited as well as 1295–1294 BC. While Ramesses I was the founder of the 19th dynasty, in reality his brief reign marked the transition between the reign of Horemheb who had stabilized Egypt in the late 18th dynasty and the rule of the powerful pharaohs of this dynasty, in particular his son Seti I and grandson Ramesses II, who would bring Egypt up to new heights of imperial power.

Second Intermediate Period of Egypt period of Ancient Egyptian history

The Second Intermediate Period marks a period when Ancient Egypt fell into disarray for a second time, between the end of the Middle Kingdom and the start of the New Kingdom.

Seti II Egyptian pharaoh, fifth ruler of the Nineteenth dynasty

Seti II was the fifth pharaoh of the Nineteenth Dynasty of Egypt and reigned from c. 1200 BC to 1194 BC. His throne name, Userkheperure Setepenre, means "Powerful are the manifestations of Re, the chosen one of Re." He was the son of Merneptah and Isetnofret II and sat on the throne during a period known for dynastic intrigue and short reigns, and his rule was no different. Seti II had to deal with many serious plots, most significantly the accession of a rival king named Amenmesse, possibly a half brother, who seized control over Thebes and Nubia in Upper Egypt during his second to fourth regnal years.

The Eighth Dynasty of ancient Egypt is a poorly known and short-lived line of pharaohs reigning in rapid succession in the early 22nd century BC, likely with their seat of power in Memphis. The Eighth Dynasty held sway at a time referred to as the very end of the Old Kingdom or the beginning of the First Intermediate Period. The power of the pharaohs was waning while that of the provincial governors, known as nomarchs, was increasingly important, the Egyptian state having by then effectively turned into a feudal system. In spite of close relations between the Memphite kings and powerful nomarchs, notably in Coptos, the Eighth Dynasty was eventually overthrown by the nomarchs of Heracleopolis Magna, who founded the Ninth Dynasty. The Eighth Dynasty is sometimes combined with the preceding Seventh Dynasty, owing to the lack of archeological evidence for the latter which may be fictitious.

Merneith ancient Egyptian queen

Merneith was a consort and a regent of Ancient Egypt during the First Dynasty. She may have been a ruler of Egypt in her own right, based on several official records. If this was the case, she may have been the first female pharaoh and the earliest queen regnant in recorded history. Her rule occurred around 2950 BC for an undetermined period. Merneith’s name means "Beloved by Neith" and her stele contains symbols of that ancient Egyptian deity. She may have been Djer's daughter and was probably Djet's senior royal wife. The former meant that she would have been the great-granddaughter of unified Egypt's first pharaoh, Narmer. She was also the mother of Den, her successor.

Osireion Archaeological site in Egypt

The Osirion or Osireon is an ancient Egyptian temple. It is located at Abydos, to the rear of the temple of Seti I.

Neferkara I ancient Egyptian ruler

Neferkara I is the cartouche name of a king (pharaoh) who is said to have ruled during the 2nd dynasty of Ancient Egypt. The exact length of his reign is unknown since the Turin canon lacks the years of rulership and the ancient Greek historian Manetho suggests that Neferkara´s reign lasted 25 years. Egyptologists evaluate his statement as misinterpretation or exaggeration.

Neferkare II Egyptian pharaoh

Neferkare II was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the Eighth Dynasty during the early First Intermediate Period. According to the egyptologists Kim Ryholt, Jürgen von Beckerath and Darell Baker he was the third king of the Eighth Dynasty. As a pharaoh of the Eighth Dynasty, Neferkare II's capital would have been Memphis.

Neferkare Neby Egyptian pharaoh

Neferkare Neby was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the Eighth Dynasty during the early First Intermediate Period. According to egyptologists Jürgen von Beckerath and Darrell Baker, he was the fourth king of the seventh dynasty, as he appears as the fourth king in the Abydos King List within the list of kings assigned to this dynasty.

Nikare Egyptian pharaoh

Nikare was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the Eighth Dynasty during the early First Intermediate Period, at a time when Egypt was possibly divided between several polities. According to the Egyptologists Kim Ryholt, Jürgen von Beckerath and Darrell Baker he was the ninth king of the Eighth Dynasty. As such, Nikare's seat of power would have been Memphis.

Neferkaure Egyptian pharaoh

Neferkaure was a pharaoh of ancient Egypt during the First Intermediate Period. According to the Abydos King List and the latest reconstruction of the Turin canon by Kim Ryholt, he was the 15th king of the Eighth Dynasty. This opinion is shared by the egyptologists Jürgen von Beckerath, Thomas Schneider and Darell Baker. As a pharaoh of the Eighth Dynasty, Neferkaure's seat of power was Memphis and he may not have held power over all of Egypt.

Neferkauhor Egyptian pharaoh

Neferkauhor Khuwihapi was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the Eighth Dynasty during the early First Intermediate Period, at a time when Egypt was possibly divided between several polities. Neferkauhor was the sixteenth and penultimate king of the Eighth Dynasty and as such would have ruled over the Memphite region. Neferkauhor reigned for little over 2 years and is one of the best attested kings of this period with eight of his decrees surviving in fragmentary condition to this day.

Neferirkare Egyptian pharaoh

Neferirkare was an ancient Egyptian pharaoh of the Eighth Dynasty during the early First Intermediate Period. According to the egyptologists Kim Ryholt, Jürgen von Beckerath and Darrell Baker he was the 17th and final king of the Eighth Dynasty. Many scholars consider Neferirkare to have been the last pharaoh of the Old Kingdom, which came to an end with the 8th Dynasty.

The Temple of Seti I may refer to the

Hudjefa is an ancient Egyptian word meaning "missing" or "erased". It was used by the royal scribes of the Ramesside era during the 19th dynasty of Ancient Egypt, when the scribes compiled king lists such as the Abydos King List, the royal table of Sakkara and the Royal Canon of Turin and the name of a deceased pharaoh was unreadable, damaged, or completely erased.

Third Dynasty of Egypt dynasty of ancient Egypt

The Third Dynasty of ancient Egypt is the first dynasty of the Old Kingdom. Other dynasties of the Old Kingdom include the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth. The capital during the period of the Old Kingdom was at Memphis.

Netjerkare Siptah Egyptian pharaoh

Netjerkare Siptah was an Ancient Egyptian pharaoh, the seventh and last ruler of the Sixth Dynasty. Alternatively some scholars classify him as the first king of the Seventh or Eighth Dynasty. As the last king of the 6th Dynasty, Netjerkare Siptah is considered by some Egyptologists to be the last king of the Old Kingdom period.