Armadillo-class tanker

Last updated
Porcupine IX-126.jpg
USS Porcupine, an Armadillo-class tanker
Class overview
Builders California Shipbuilding Corporation, Delta Shipbuilding Company
Operators United States Navy, Maritime Commission
In service18 November 1943 [1] - 12 July 1946 [2]
Completed18
Lost1 [3]
Retired17
General characteristics
Type Liberty tanker
Displacement14,245 tons
Length
Beam57 ft (17 m)
Draft27 ft 9 in (8 m)
Propulsion2,500  hp (1,900 kW)
Speed11 knots (20 km/h; 13 mph)
Capacity
  • 10,674  DWT
  • 7,219  GRT
  • 272,978 cu ft (7,729.9 m3; 48,619.5 bbl)
Complement81 officers and enlisted
Armament

The Armadillo class of tankers was a class of Type Z-ET1-S-C3 Liberty T1 tanker type, that were commissioned into the United States Navy. They were given the hull classification symbols of unclassified miscellaneous vessels.

This group of Liberty based tankers all served in the United States Navy during the Second World War. Each ship was commissioned in late 1943, and decommissioned in the summer of 1946. These ships primarily served in the Asian-Pacific theater of the war. These ships brought aviation gasoline to remote islands in the south Pacific, required for the many aerial reconnaissance missions there. [4]


Notable incident

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