Coptic Canadians

Last updated
Coptic Canadians
Total population
estimated 50,000-100,000 (by ancestry, 2011 Census ) [1]
Regions with significant populations
Ontario : Mississauga, Toronto (North York, Scarborough, Etobicoke), Hamilton, Kitchener; Quebec : Montreal, Laval, Quebec City; etc.
Languages
Canadian English  · Canadian French
Mainly older people: Arabic (Egyptian Arabic, Sudanese Arabic, Libyan Arabic)
Liturgical: Coptic language.
Religion
Coptic Orthodoxy, Coptic Catholicism, Coptic Evangelical and Coptic Atheism

Copts in Canada are Canadian citizens of Coptic descent or people of Coptic descent residing in Canada.

Canada Country in North America

Canada is a country in the northern part of North America. Its ten provinces and three territories extend from the Atlantic to the Pacific and northward into the Arctic Ocean, covering 9.98 million square kilometres, making it the world's second-largest country by total area. Its southern border with the United States, stretching some 8,891 kilometres (5,525 mi), is the world's longest bi-national land border. Canada's capital is Ottawa, and its three largest metropolitan areas are Toronto, Montreal, and Vancouver.

Contents

Population and distribution

According to the 2011 Census there were 3,570 Canadians who claimed Coptic ancestry (this figure combines single and multiple ethnic origin responses). [2] An additional 73,250 Canadians claimed Egyptian ancestry, and some of these are believed to be Copts. [2]

The Canadian Coptic Association estimates that there are 35,000 Copts living in Canada; according to CBC News, "if other sects with strong ties to the Coptic community are included, the figure is possibly higher still." [3] (Note: There is likely a typo in the CBC article where an extra zero was added, thereby erroneous stating that there are 350,000 Copts in Canada).

CBC News news division of the Canadian broadcast network CBC

CBC News is the division of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation responsible for the news gathering and production of news programs on the corporation's English-language operations, namely CBC Television, CBC Radio, CBC News Network, and CBC.ca. Founded in 1941, CBC News is the largest news broadcaster in Canada and has local, regional and national broadcasts and stations. It frequently collaborates with its French-language counterpart, Radio-Canada Info, although the two are organizationally separate.

Toronto and the surrounding metropolitan region have the largest concentration of Copts in Canada. [3]

Toronto Provincial capital city in Ontario, Canada

Toronto is the provincial capital of Ontario and the most populous city in Canada, with a population of 2,731,571 in 2016. Current to 2016, the Toronto census metropolitan area (CMA), of which the majority is within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), held a population of 5,928,040, making it Canada's most populous CMA. The city is the anchor of the Golden Horseshoe, an urban agglomeration of 9,245,438 people surrounding the western end of Lake Ontario. Toronto is an international centre of business, finance, arts, and culture, and is recognized as one of the most multicultural and cosmopolitan cities in the world.

Greater Toronto Area Metropolitan area in Ontario, Canada

The Greater Toronto Area (GTA) is the most populous metropolitan area in Canada. It consists of the central city, Toronto, along with 25 surrounding cities and towns distributed among four regional municipalities: Durham, Halton, Peel, and York. According to the 2016 census, the Greater Toronto Area has a population of 6,417,516.

Immigration history

St. George & St. Rueiss Coptic Orthodox Church in Toronto, Ontario. St. George & St. Rueiss Coptic Orthodox Church.JPG
St. George & St. Rueiss Coptic Orthodox Church in Toronto, Ontario.
St. Mina and St. Kyrillos Coptic Orthodox Church in Mississauga, Ontario. Saint Mina and Saint Kyrillos Coptic Orthodox Church.jpg
St. Mina and St. Kyrillos Coptic Orthodox Church in Mississauga, Ontario.

The immigration of the Copts to Canada might have started as early as the late 1950s. Due to an increasing amount of discrimination towards Copts in Egypt in the 1970s, many decided to emigrate in order to escape the rising racial tensions. Canada has been receiving a greater number of these immigrants, and the number of Coptic immigrants into Canada has been growing ever since. [4]

Coptic Orthodox Church in Canada

In 1964, St. Mark Coptic Orthodox Church was established in Toronto; this was the first Coptic church established in the Coptic diaspora. [5]

The Coptic diaspora consists of Copts who live outside of their primary area of residence within parts of present-day Egypt, Libya and Sudan.

In 2002, a survey showed 22 Coptic Orthodox parishes in Canada, indicating growth. [6]

In 2011, there were five Coptic Orthodox churches in Montreal. [7]

Notable Coptic Canadians

See also

Related Research Articles

Copts An ethnoreligious group indigenous to North Africa

The Copts are an ethnoreligious group indigenous to Northeast Africa who primarily inhabit the area of modern Egypt, where they are the largest Christian denomination in the country. Copts are also the largest Christian denomination in Sudan and Libya. Historically, they spoke the Coptic language, a direct descendant of the Demotic Egyptian that was spoken in late antiquity. While the vast majority of Copts are of Egyptian ancestry, North Africans and Northeast Africans who have converted to the religion also identify as such.

Egyptian Americans are Americans of Egyptian ancestry. The 2016 US Census estimated the number of people with Egyptian ancestry at 256,000. Egyptian Americans may also include the Egyptian foreign-born population in the United States. The US Census Bureau estimated in 2016 that there were 181,677 foreign-born Egyptians in the United States. They represented around 0.4% of the total US foreign-born population as 42,194,354 first-generation immigrants in 2016.

Religion in Egypt Religion in Egypt

Religion in Egypt controls many aspects of social life and is endorsed by law. The state religion of Egypt is Islam. Although estimates vary greatly in the absence of official statistics. Since the 2006 census religion has been excluded, and thus available statistics are estimates made by religious and non-governmental agencies. The country is majority Sunni Muslim, with the next largest religious group being Coptic Christians. The exact numbers are subject to controversy, with Christians alleging that they have been systemically under-counted in existing censuses.

The Lebanese people are the people inhabiting or originating from Lebanon. The term may also include those who had inhabited Mount Lebanon and the Anti-Lebanon mountains prior to the creation of the modern Lebanese state. The major religious groups among the Lebanese people within Lebanon are Shia Muslims (27%), Sunni Muslims (27%), Maronite Christians (21%), Greek Orthodox Christians (8%), Melkite Christians (5%), Druze (5.6%), Protestant Christians (1%). The largest contingente of Lebanese, however, comprise a diaspora in North America, South America, Europe, Australia and Africa, which is predominantly Maronite Christian.

Coptic flag Flag representing Copts, indigenous people of Egypt

The Coptic flag was created in 2005 by Coptic activists in different countries to represent Coptic communities both in Egypt and in the Coptic diaspora. It is not recognized by the Coptic Orthodox Church of Alexandria, but many Copts worldwide have adopted it as a symbol of Coptic identity. The Coptic flag has been officially recognized and adopted by the New Zealand Coptic Association and the Free Copts.

Coptic Orthodox Church in Canada

The immigration of the Copts to Canada might have started as early as the late 1950s. Due to an increasing amount of discrimination towards Copts in Egypt in the 1970s and low income in Egypt. Canada has been receiving a greater number of these immigrants, and the number of Coptic immigrants into Canada has been growing ever since.

Christianity in Egypt

Christianity is second largest religion in Egypt. The number of Egyptian Christians, nearly all of whom are Coptic Christians, is uncertain; 10-15 ٪ is currently the accepted range and estimation by Egyptian officials, although it may be higher up 25%. While a minority within Egypt, Egypt's Christian population is the largest in absolute numbers in the Middle East and North Africa. The history of Christianity in Egypt dates to the Roman era as Alexandria was an early center of Christianity.

Egyptian Australians

Egyptian Australians are Australian citizens and Australian permanent residents of Egyptian descent. According to the Australian 2011 Census, 36,532 Australian citizens and permanent residents declared that they were born in Egypt, while based on the 2006 Census, at least an additional 31,786 declared that they were of full or partial Egyptian ancestry and born in a country other than Egypt.

Macedonian Canadians

Macedonian Canadians are Canadian citizens of ethnic Macedonian descent or Macedonian-born people who reside in Canada. According to the 2016 Census there were 43,110 Canadians who claimed full or partial Macedonian ancestry.

Egyptian Canadians are Canadian citizens of Egyptian descent, first-generation Egyptian immigrants, or descendants of Egyptians who emigrated to Canada. According to the 2011 Census there were 73,250 Canadian citizens who are born in Egypt, having an increase compared to those in the 2006 Census, making them by far the second largest group of people with Arabic-speaking roots. The largest religious group among Egyptian Canadians are the Coptic Orthodox Christians, who number around over 200,000 members in Canada. Muslims constitute a smaller portion of the Egyptian community in Canada, belonging to the Sunni sect of Islam. A small number of Egyptian Christians who immigrated to Canada include Coptic Catholics, Eastern Orthodox and Protestants. Most Egyptian Canadians are concentrated in Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver.

Coptic identity

Copts have a long history as a significant Christian minority in Egypt, in which Muslim adherents form the majority. Coptic Christians lost their majority status in Egypt after the 14th century and the spread of Islamization in the entire North Africa following the imposition of heavy taxation and conversions of those who couldn't afford it.

Syro-Lebanese in Egypt

The Syro-Lebanese of Egypt, also known as the Levantines of Egypt, are an ethnic minority group in Egypt. They are Egyptians who have ancestry originating from the Levant, mostly what is now Syria and Lebanon. The majority of Egypt's historic Syro-Lebanese community is Christian, although some families were also Muslim (Shia/Sunni) and Jewish.

Copts in Egypt refers to Coptic people born in or residing in Egypt.

Copts in Sudan

Copts in Sudan may refer to people born in or residing in Sudan of full or partial Coptic origin.

Coptic Americans are American citizens of Coptic descent or persons of Coptic descent residing in the United States of America. According to the American Coptic Association, there are approximately 450,000 Copts in the United States since many ethnic Copts listed themselves in the 2011 U.S. Census mistakenly as either Egyptians, Sudanese, Libyans or Americans and by this way reducing the ethnic Coptic population in the United States to not be even included within the 2011 U.S. Census. Estimates for the number of ethnic Copts in the US range from 700,000 to more than 1 million.

Coptic Australians are Australians of Coptic descent or persons of Coptic descent residing in Australia. According to the 2011 census, there were 24,693 Copts in Australia, mostly members of the Coptic Orthodox Church. The ethnic Coptic population within Australia is estimated to be between 70,000 and 100,000 people.

Coptic nationalism

Coptic nationalism refers to the nationalism of Copts, an ethno-religious group that primarily inhabit the area of modern Egypt, where they are the largest Christian denomination.

Egyptian New Zealanders are New Zealand citizens and New Zealand permanent residents of Egyptian descent. According to the New Zealand 2013 Census, 1,110 New Zealand citizens and permanent residents declared that they were of Egyptian descent.

References

  1. Statistics Canada. "2011 National Household Survey: Data tables" . Retrieved 11 February 2014.
  2. 1 2 Statistics Canada. "2011 National Household Survey: Data tables" . Retrieved 11 February 2014.
  3. 1 2 Coptic Christians in Canada, CBC News (January 3, 2011).
  4. https://www.nytimes.com/1993/03/15/world/muslims-fury-falls-on-egypt-s-christians.html
  5. Saad Michael Saad, "Coptic Civilization in the Diaspora" in Coptic Civilization: Two Thousand Years of Christianity in Egypt (ed. Gawdat Gabra: American University in Cairo Press, 2014), p. 291.
  6. Charles D. Smith, "The Egyptian Copts: Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Definition of Identity for a Religious Minority" in Nationalism and Minority Identities in Islamic Societies (ed. Maya Shatzmiller: McGill-Queen's University Press, 2005), p. 60.
  7. Coptic churches in Canada on alert, CBC News (January 4, 2011).