Digital Visual Interface

Last updated
Digital Visual Interface (DVI)
DVI.png
Type Digital computer video connector
Designer Digital Display Working Group
Designed April 1999
Produced 1999–present
Superseded VGA connector
Superseded by DisplayPort, HDMI
Hot pluggable Yes
External Yes
Video signal Digital video stream:
Single link: 1920 × 1200 (WUXGA) @ 60 Hz
Dual link: 2560 × 1600 (WQXGA) @ 60 Hz
Analog video stream: 1920 × 1200 (WUXGA) @ 60 Hz
Pins 29
Bitrate (Single link) 3.96 Gbit/s
(Dual link) 7.92 Gbit/s
Max. devices 1
Protocol 3 × transition minimized differential signaling data and clock
DVI Connector Pinout.svg
A female DVI-I socket from the front
DVI pinout.svg
Color coded (click to read text)
Pin 1 TMDS data 2− Digital red− (link 1)
Pin 2 TMDS data 2+ Digital red+ (link 1)
Pin 3 TMDS data 2/4 shield
Pin 4 TMDS data 4− Digital green− (link 2)
Pin 5 TMDS data 4+ Digital green+ (link 2)
Pin 6 DDC clock
Pin 7 DDC data
Pin 8 Analog vertical sync
Pin 9 TMDS data 1− Digital green− (link 1)
Pin 10 TMDS data 1+ Digital green+ (link 1)
Pin 11 TMDS data 1/3 shield
Pin 12 TMDS data 3− Digital blue− (link 2)
Pin 13 TMDS data 3+ Digital blue+ (link 2)
Pin 14 +5 V Power for monitor when in standby
Pin 15 Ground Return for pin 14 and analog sync
Pin 16 Hot plug detect
Pin 17 TMDS data 0− Digital blue− (link 1) and digital sync
Pin 18 TMDS data 0+ Digital blue+ (link 1) and digital sync
Pin 19 TMDS data 0/5 shield
Pin 20 TMDS data 5− Digital red− (link 2)
Pin 21 TMDS data 5+ Digital red+ (link 2)
Pin 22 TMDS clock shield
Pin 23 TMDS clock+ Digital clock+ (links 1 and 2)
Pin 24 TMDS clock− Digital clock− (links 1 and 2)
C1 Analog red 
C2 Analog green 
C3 Analog blue 
C4 Analog horizontal sync 
C5 Analog ground Return for R, G, and B signals

Digital Visual Interface (DVI) is a video display interface developed by the Digital Display Working Group (DDWG). The digital interface is used to connect a video source, such as a video display controller, to a display device, such as a computer monitor. It was developed with the intention of creating an industry standard for the transfer of digital video content.

Contents

This interface is designed to transmit uncompressed digital video and can be configured to support multiple modes such as DVI-A (analog only), DVI-D (digital only) or DVI-I (digital and analog). Featuring support for analog connections, the DVI specification is compatible with the VGA interface. [1] This compatibility, along with other advantages, led to its widespread acceptance over competing digital display standards Plug and Display (P&D) and Digital Flat Panel (DFP). [2] Although DVI is predominantly associated with computers, it is sometimes used in other consumer electronics such as television sets and DVD players.

Technical overview

DVI's digital video transmission format is based on panelLink, a serial format developed by Silicon Image that utilizes a high-speed serial link called transition minimized differential signaling (TMDS). Like modern analog VGA connectors, the DVI connector includes pins for the display data channel (DDC). A newer version of DDC called DDC2 allows the graphics adapter to read the monitor's extended display identification data (EDID). If a display supports both analog and digital signals in one DVI-I input, each input method can host a distinct EDID. Since the DDC can only support one EDID, this can be a problem if both the digital and analog inputs in the DVI-I port detect activity. It is up to the display to choose which EDID to send.

When a source and display are connected, the source first queries the display's capabilities by reading the monitor EDID block over an I²C link. The EDID block contains the display's identification, color characteristics (such as gamma value), and table of supported video modes. The table can designate a preferred mode or native resolution. Each mode is a set of CRT timing values that define the duration and frequency of the horizontal/vertical sync, the positioning of the active display area, the horizontal resolution, vertical resolution, and refresh rate.

For backward compatibility with displays using analog VGA signals, some of the contacts in the DVI connector carry the analog VGA signals. To ensure a basic level of interoperability, DVI compliant devices are required to support one baseline video mode, "low pixel format" (640 × 480 at 60 Hz). Digitally encoded video pixel data is transported using multiple TMDS links. At the electrical level, these links are highly resistant to electrical noise and other forms of analog distortion.

A single link DVI connection consists of four TMDS links; each link transmits data from the source to the device over one twisted pair. Three of the links represent the RGB components (red, green, and blue) of the video signal for a total of 24 bits per pixel. The fourth link carries the pixel clock. The binary data is encoded using 8b10b encoding. DVI does not use packetization, but rather transmits the pixel data as if it were a rasterized analog video signal. As such, the complete frame is drawn during each vertical refresh period. The full active area of each frame is always transmitted without compression. Video modes typically use horizontal and vertical refresh timings that are compatible with CRT displays, though this is not a requirement. In single-link mode, the maximum pixel clock frequency is 165 MHz that supports a maximum resolution of 2.75  megapixels (including blanking interval) at 60 Hz refresh. For practical purposes, this allows a maximum 16:10 screen resolution of 1920 × 1200 at 60 Hz.

To support higher-resolution display devices, the DVI specification contains a provision for dual link. Dual-link DVI doubles the number of TMDS pairs, effectively doubling the video bandwidth. As a result, higher resolutions up to 2560 × 1600 are supported at 60 Hz.

Cable length

The maximum length recommended for DVI cables is not included in the specification, since it is dependent on the pixel clock frequency. In general, cable lengths up to 4.5 metres (15 ft) will work for display resolutions up to 1920 × 1200. Longer cables up to 15 metres (49 ft) in length can be used with display resolutions 1280 × 1024 or lower. For greater distances, the use of a DVI booster—a signal repeater which may use an external power supply—is recommended to help mitigate signal degradation.

Connector

Female DVI connector pins (view of plug) DVI Connector Types.svg
Female DVI connector pins (view of plug)
Female M1-DA connector pins (view of plug) M1-DA.svg
Female M1-DA connector pins (view of plug)
A male DVI-D (single link) connector Dvi-cable.jpg
A male DVI-D (single link) connector
Digital Visual Interface - DVI.jpg

The DVI connector on a device is given one of three names, depending on which signals it implements:

Most DVI connector types—the exception is DVI-A—have pins that pass digital video signals. These come in two varieties: single link and dual link. Single link DVI employs a single 165 MHz transmitter that supports resolutions up to 1920 × 1200 at 60 Hz. Dual link DVI adds six pins, at the center of the connector, for a second transmitter increasing the bandwidth and supporting resolutions up to 2560 × 1600 at 60 Hz. [3] [4] A connector with these additional pins is sometimes referred to as DVI-DL (dual link). Dual link should not be confused with dual display (also known as dual head), which is a configuration consisting of a single computer connected to two monitors, sometimes using a DMS-59 connector for two single link DVI connections.

In addition to digital, some DVI connectors also have pins that pass an analog signal, which can be used to connect an analog monitor. The analog pins are the four that surround the flat blade on a DVI-I or DVI-A connector. A VGA monitor, for example, can be connected to a video source with DVI-I through the use of a passive adapter. Since the analog pins are directly compatible with VGA signaling, passive adapters are simple and cheap to produce, providing a cost-effective solution to support VGA on DVI. The long flat pin on a DVI-I connector is wider than the same pin on a DVI-D connector, so even if the four analog pins were manually removed, it still wouldn't be possible to connect a male DVI-I to a female DVI-D. It is possible, however, to join a male DVI-D connector with a female DVI-I connector. [5]

DVI is the only widespread video standard that includes analog and digital transmission in the same connector. [6] Competing standards are exclusively digital: these include a system using low-voltage differential signaling (LVDS), known by its proprietary names FPD-Link (flat-panel display) and FLATLINK; and its successors, the LVDS Display Interface (LDI) and OpenLDI.

Some DVD players, HDTV sets, and video projectors have DVI connectors that transmit an encrypted signal for copy protection using the High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection (HDCP) protocol. Computers can be connected to HDTV sets over DVI, but the graphics card must support HDCP to play content protected by digital rights management (DRM).

Specifications

A passive DVI-to-VGA adapter. This adapter will not work with a DVI-D output. It requires a DVI-I or DVI-A output to get the analog signal to a VGA input (even if the adapter looks like a DVI-D). A more expensive active adapter (or converter) is required to connect DVI-D to VGA. Adapter DVI to VGA.jpg
A passive DVI-to-VGA adapter. This adapter will not work with a DVI-D output. It requires a DVI-I or DVI-A output to get the analog signal to a VGA input (even if the adapter looks like a DVI-D). A more expensive active adapter (or converter) is required to connect DVI-D to VGA.

Digital

Generalized Timing Formula (GTF) is a VESA standard which can easily be calculated with the Linux gtf utility. Coordinated Video Timings-Reduced Blanking (CVT-RB) is a VESA standard which offers reduced horizontal and vertical blanking for non-CRT based displays. [7]

Digital data encoding

One of the purposes of DVI stream encoding is to provide a DC-balanced output link that reduces decoding errors. This goal is achieved by using 10-bit symbols for 8-bit or less characters and using the extra bits for the DC balancing.

Like other ways of transmitting video, there are two different regions: the active region, where pixel data is sent, and the control region, where synchronization signals are sent. The active region is encoded using transition-minimized differential signaling, where the control region is encoded with a fixed 8b/10b encoding. As the two schemes yield different 10-bit symbols, a receiver can fully differentiate between active and control regions.

When DVI was designed, most computer monitors were still of the cathode ray tube type that require analog video synchronization signals. The timing of the digital synchronization signals matches the equivalent analog ones, making the process of transforming DVI to and from an analog signal a process that does not require extra (high-speed) memory, expensive at the time.

HDCP is an extra layer that transforms the 10-bit symbols before sending through the link. Only after correct authorization can the receiver undo the HDCP encryption. Control regions are not encrypted in order to let the receiver know when the active region starts.

Clock and data relationship

The DVI data channel operates at a bit-rate that is 10 times the frequency of the clock signal. In other words, in each DVI clock period there is a 10-bit symbol per channel. The set of three 10-bit symbols represents one complete pixel in single link mode and can represent either one or two complete pixels as a set of six 10-bit symbols in dual link mode.

DVI links provide differential pairs for data and for the clock. The specification document allows the data and the clock to not be aligned. However, as the ratio between clock and bit rate is fixed at 1:10, the unknown alignment is kept over time. The receiver must recover the bits on the stream using any of the techniques of clock/data recovery and find then the correct symbol boundary. The DVI specification allows the input clock to vary between 25 MHz and 165 MHz. This 1:6.6 ratio can make pixel recovery difficult, as phase-locked loops, if used, need to work over a large frequency range. One benefit of DVI over other links is that it is relatively straightforward to transform the signal from the digital domain into the analog domain using a video DAC, as both clock and synchronization signals are sent over the link. Fixed frequency links, like DisplayPort, need to reconstruct the clock from the data sent over the link.

Display power management

The DVI specification includes signaling for reducing power consumption. Similar to the analog VESA display power management signaling (DPMS) standard, a connected device can turn a monitor off when the connected device is powered down, or programmatically if the display controller of the device supports it. Devices with this capability can also attain Energy Star certification.

Analog

The analog section of the DVI specification document is brief and points to other specifications like VESA VSIS [8] for electrical characteristics and GTFS for timing information. The idea of the analog link is to keep compatibility with the previous VGA cables and connectors. HSync, Vsync and three video channels are available in both VGA and DVI connectors and are electrically compatible. Auxiliary links like DDC are also available. A passive adapter can be used in order to carry the analog signals between the two connectors.

DVI and HDMI compatibility

HDMI is a newer digital audio/video interface developed and promoted by the consumer electronics industry. DVI and HDMI have the same electrical specifications for their TMDS and VESA/DDC links. However HDMI and DVI differ in several key ways.

To promote interoperability between DVI-D and HDMI devices, HDMI source components and displays support DVI-D signalling. For example, an HDMI display can be driven by a DVI-D source because HDMI and DVI-D both define an overlapping minimum set of supported resolutions and frame buffer formats.

Some DVI-D sources use non-standard extensions to output HDMI signals including audio (e.g. ATI 3000-series and NVIDIA GTX 200-series). [9] Some multimedia displays use a DVI to HDMI adapter to input the HDMI signal with audio. Exact capabilities vary by video card specifications.

In the reverse scenario, a DVI display that lacks optional support for HDCP might be unable to display protected content even though it is otherwise compatible with the HDMI source. Features specific to HDMI such as remote control, audio transport, xvYCC and deep color are not usable in devices that support only DVI signals. HDCP compatibility between source and destination devices is subject to manufacturer specifications for each device.

Proposed successors

In December 2010, Intel, AMD, and several computer and display manufacturers announced they would stop supporting DVI-I, VGA and LVDS-technologies from 2013/2015, and instead speed up adoption of DisplayPort and HDMI. [10] [11] They also stated: "Legacy interfaces such as VGA, DVI and LVDS have not kept pace, and newer standards such as DisplayPort and HDMI clearly provide the best connectivity options moving forward. In our opinion, DisplayPort 1.2 is the future interface for PC monitors, along with HDMI 1.4a for TV connectivity".

See also

Related Research Articles

VESA (/ˈviːsə/), formally known as Video Electronics Standards Association, is a technical standards organization for computer display standards. The organization was incorporated in California in July 1989 and has its office in San Jose, California. It claims a membership of over 225 companies.

Video Graphics Array analog computer display standard and a display resolution

Video Graphics Array (VGA) is a graphics standard for video display controller first introduced with the IBM PS/2 line of computers in 1987, following CGA and EGA introduced in earlier IBM personal computers. Through widespread adoption, the term has also come to mean either an analog computer display standard, the 15-pin D-subminiature VGA connector, or the 640×480 resolution characteristic of the VGA hardware.

A video card is an expansion card which generates a feed of output images to a display device. Frequently, these are advertised as discrete or dedicated graphics cards, emphasizing the distinction between these and integrated graphics. At the core of both is the graphics processing unit (GPU), which is the main part that does the actual computations, but should not be confused with the video card as a whole, although "GPU" is often used to refer to video cards.

Extended Display Identification Data (EDID) is a metadata format for display devices to describe their capabilities to a video source. The data format is defined by a standard published by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA).

The Display Data Channel, or DDC, is a collection of protocols for digital communication between a computer display and a graphics adapter that enable the display to communicate its supported display modes to the adapter and that enable the computer host to adjust monitor parameters, such as brightness and contrast.

A random-access memory digital-to-analog converter (RAMDAC) is a combination of three fast digital-to-analog converters (DACs) with a small static random-access memory (SRAM) used in computer graphics display controllers to store the color palette and to generate the analog signals to drive a color monitor. The logical color number from the display memory is fed into the address inputs of the SRAM to select a palette entry to appear on the data output of the SRAM. This entry is composed of three separate values corresponding to the three components of the desired physical color. Each component value is fed to a separate DAC, whose analog output goes to the monitor, and ultimately to one of its three electron guns.

Serial digital interface family of digital video interfaces

Serial digital interface (SDI) is a family of digital video interfaces first standardized by SMPTE in 1989. For example, ITU-R BT.656 and SMPTE 259M define digital video interfaces used for broadcast-grade video. A related standard, known as high-definition serial digital interface (HD-SDI), is standardized in SMPTE 292M; this provides a nominal data rate of 1.485 Gbit/s.

HDMI Proprietary interface for transmitting digital audio and video data

HDMI is a proprietary audio/video interface for transmitting uncompressed video data and compressed or uncompressed digital audio data from an HDMI-compliant source device, such as a display controller, to a compatible computer monitor, video projector, digital television, or digital audio device. HDMI is a digital replacement for analog video standards.

VGA connector three-row 15-pin DE-15 connector

A Video Graphics Array (VGA) connector is a three-row 15-pin DE-15 connector. The 15-pin VGA connector was provided on many video cards, computer monitors, laptop computers, projectors, and high definition television sets. On laptop computers or other small devices, a mini-VGA port was sometimes used in place of the full-sized VGA connector.

HD ready

The HD ready is a certification program introduced in 2005 by EICTA, now DIGITALEUROPE. HD ready minimum native resolution is 720 rows in widescreen ratio.

DisplayPort digital display interface

DisplayPort (DP) is a digital display interface developed by a consortium of PC and chip manufacturers and standardized by the Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA). The interface is primarily used to connect a video source to a display device such as a computer monitor, and it can also carry audio, USB, and other forms of data.

Mini-DVI connector is used on certain Apple computers as a digital alternative to the Mini-VGA connector

The Mini-DVI connector is used on certain Apple computers as a digital alternative to the Mini-VGA connector. Its size is between the full-sized DVI and the tiny Micro-DVI. It is found on the 12-inch PowerBook G4, Intel-based iMac, the MacBook Intel-based laptop, the Intel-based Xserve, the 2009 Mac mini, and some late model eMacs.

Serial Digital Video Out (SDVO) is a proprietary Intel technology introduced with their 9xx-series of motherboard chipsets.

Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) is an industry standard for a mobile audio/video interface that allows the connection of smartphones, tablets, and other portable consumer electronics devices to high-definition televisions (HDTVs), audio receivers, and projectors. The standard was designed to share existing mobile device connectors, such as Micro-USB, and avoid the need to add additional video connectors on devices with limited space for them.

Mini DisplayPort miniaturized connector used for DisplayPort and Thunderbolt

The Mini DisplayPort is a miniaturized version of the DisplayPort audio-visual digital interface.

Audio connectors and video connectors are electrical or optical connectors for carrying audio and video signals. Audio interfaces and video interfaces define physical parameters and interpretation of signals. For digital audio and digital video, this can be thought of as defining the physical layer, data link layer, and most or all of the application layer. For analog audio and analog video these functions are all represented in a single signal specification like NTSC or the direct speaker-driving signal of analog audio. Physical characteristics of the electrical or optical equipment includes the types and numbers of wires required, voltages, frequencies, optical intensity, and the physical design of the connectors. Any data link layer details define how application data is encapsulated. Application layer details define the actual audio or video format being transmitted, often incorporating a codecs not specific to the interface, such as PCM, MPEG-2, or the DTS Coherent Acoustics codec. In some cases, the application layer is left open; for example, HDMI contains an Ethernet channel for general data transmission.

Graphics display resolution type of image resolution

The graphics display resolution is the width and height dimension of an electronic visual display device, such as a computer monitor, in pixels. Certain combinations of width and height are standardized and typically given a name and an initialism that is descriptive of its dimensions. A higher display resolution in a display of the same size means that displayed photo or video content appears sharper, and pixel art appears smaller.

V-by-One HS is an electrical digital signaling standard that can run at faster speeds over inexpensive twisted-pair copper cables than Low-voltage differential signaling, or LVDS. It was originally developed by THine Electronics, Inc. in 2007 for high-definition televisions but since 2010 V-by-One HS has been widely adopted in various markets such as document processing, automotive infotainment systems, industrial cameras and machine vision, robotics and amusement equipments.

AMD Eyefinity brand of AMD products

AMD Eyefinity is a brand name for AMD video card products that support multi-monitor setups by integrating multiple display controllers on one GPU. AMD Eyefinity was introduced with the Radeon HD 5000 Series "Evergreen" in September 2009 and has been available on APUs and professional-grade graphics cards branded AMD FirePro as well.

References

  1. "Digital Visual Interface adoption accelerates as industry prepares for next wave of DVI-compliant products". DDWG, copy preserved by Internet Archive. February 16, 2000. Archived from the original on 28 August 2007. Retrieved 29 March 2012.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  2. Eiden, Hermann (July 7, 1999). "TFT Guide Part 3 - Digital Interfaces". TomsHardware.com. Retrieved 29 March 2012.
  3. "PC Magazine Encyclopedia: Definition of DVI". PC Magazine. Retrieved November 7, 2013.
  4. Walton, Jarred (March 2, 2007). "Dell 2407WFP and 3007WFP LCD Comparison". AnandTech. Retrieved November 7, 2013.
  5. Docter, Quentin; Dulaney, Emmett; Skandier, Toby (2012). CompTIA A+ Complete Deluxe Study Guide: Exams 220-801 and 220-802. Indianapolis, Indiana: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. ISBN   978-1118324066.
  6. Kruegle, Herman (2006). "8". CCTV Surveillance: Analog and Digital Video Practices And Technology. Butterworth-Heinemann. p. 268. ISBN   0-7506-7768-6.
  7. "Advanced Timing and CEA/EIA-861B Timings". NVIDIA. Retrieved 2008-06-18.
  8. Video Signal Standard (VSIS) Version 1, Rev. 2, available for purchuase at http://www.vesa.org/
  9. "HDMI Specification 1.3a Appendix C" (PDF). HDMI Licensing, LLC. 2006-11-10. Retrieved 2009-11-18.
  10. Intel NewsromLeading PC Companies Move to All Digital Display Technology, Phasing out Analog (8. December 2010)
  11. "HDMI versions". 2017-01-17. Wednesday, 1 February 2017

Further reading